Subject: Joyce Gross From: Bettina Havig <bettinaqc@socket.net> Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2013 08:08:50 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

I believe the date for the Gross memorial is correctly Jan. 27, a Sunday. I have the date from family and close friends.

I know how typos happen.

Bettina Havig

---------------------------------------------------------------------- Subject: For more on Joyce Gross, see her Quilt Treasure portrait From: megmaxc@aol.com Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2013 14:09:55 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 1

Dear QHL List Members: As has been said, Joyce Gross made enormous contributions to the field of quilt documentation and history, leaving behind a solid legacy that will help future historians appreciate the country's remarkable 20th century quilt renaissance. You can get many details about her work and also watch a short documentary that includes an interview with Joyce on the Quilt Alliance website. She was among about 15 individuals chosen as "Quilt Treasures" by the nonprofit Quilt Alliance, which produced these online portraits in collaboration w th the Michigan State University Museum and MATRIX: Center for Humane Arts, Letters and Social Sciences Online. Here is the link to the Joyce Gross tribute: http://www.allianceforamericanquilts.org/treasures/main.php?id3D5-16-5. gratefully, Meg Cox, president, Quilt Alliance

www.megcox.com Princeton, NJ Find me on Facebook

Read the latest issue of Quilt Journalist Tells All!

Video trailer for my new book!

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Subject: RE: Quilts as cake. From: "Kathy Moore" <kmoore81@austin.rr.com> Date: Tue, 1 Jan 2013 11:47:15 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

Stunning. How in the world did anyone figure that out???

Hope the holidays were good to you. Happy new year.

It was quiet here and relatively mild compared to Nebraska. Ray and I both had bad colds and coughs which are just now beginning to go away, thank goodness. The kids went to Atlanta to visit their aunt, uncle, and cousins and are one their way back home now.

Stay in touch,

Kathy

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Subject: Re: Joyce Gross From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt@rockisland.com> Date: Tue, 01 Jan 2013 11:34:30 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3

The memorial blog post to Joyce Gross is now on the TQHF blog. Any and all are welcome to leave a comment, a story, or a note to the family.

http://thequiltershalloffame.blogspot.com/

Karen Alexander

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Subject: RE: Quilts as cake. From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt@rockisland.com> Date: Wed, 02 Jan 2013 22:14:24 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

Stephanie, speaking of creative "quilt" cakes, here are a couple that were entered in a contest The Quilters Hall of Fame had in 2010.

http://quiltershalloffamebirthdayparty.blogspot.com/2010/08/2010-tqhf-birthd ay-party-report.html

Or a shorter url:

http://tinyurl.com/ba596fr

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Link to Quilt Treasures portrait of Joyce Gross From: megmaxc@aol.com Date: Thu, 3 Jan 2013 08:28:47 -0500 (EST)

Sorry, but when I posted previously about the mini-documentary and other biographical materials about Joyce Gross on the Quilt Alliance website, somehow the wrong url was posted, which was for Virginia Avery's Quilt Treasure. Here is the correct link for Joyce: http://www.allianceforamericanquilts.org/treasures/main.php?id3D5-16-5. Thanks, Meg Cox

www.megcox.com President, Quilt Alliance Find me on Facebook

Read the latest issue of Quilt Journalist Tells All!

Video trailer for my new book!

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Subject: RE: Woven Coverlets, weavers and materials From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieber@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 03 Jan 2013 15:07:52 -0800

I have a quick question that I hope doesn't sound silly.

When itinerant weavers came to town, did they use materials provided by the person purchasing the coverlet or did they provide both service and materials?

I have looked through several of my books and I don't have a clear answer. Some of the books talk about the materials being home spun, but they don't say who provided them.

Just wondering and didn't want to assume it was the household who would purchase the coverlet that provided the materials.

Thanks and if you have a reference it would make my answer all that much better.

Leah Z in chilly SoCal!

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Subject: RE: Woven Coverlets, weavers and materials From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> Date: Thu, 3 Jan 2013 19:14:14 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Some weavers used yarn spun and dyed by the customer and some preferred to use their own product. Take a look at some of the material in Pauline Montgomery, Indiana Coverlet Weavers and their Coverlets (1981, I think).

Xenia

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Subject: RE: Woven Coverlets, weavers and materials From: Leah Zieber <leah.zieber@verizon.net> Date: Thu, 03 Jan 2013 17:09:28 -0800 X-Message-Number: 5

Thanks Xenia!

Sent from Leah's iPhone

On Jan 3, 2013, at 4:14 PM, Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> wrote:

> Some weavers used yarn spun and dyed by the customer and some preferred to use their own product. Take a look at some of the material in Pauline Mont gomery, Indiana Coverlet Weavers and their Coverlets (1981, I think). >

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Subject: RE: Woven Coverlets, weavers and materials From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts@yahoo.com>

As I recall from reading coverlet books, both were posssible - buyers provided wool spun from their own sheep, or else the weaver supplied everything. I suspect there might have been a distinction between overshot, simpler geometric coverlets and blankets woven by itinerant weavers or the homeowner him or herself using the buyers' own wool, and the more complex jacquard woven coverlets, which were made by weavers with their own 'factory' workshop locations, probably providing the wool materials as well as the technology.

Laura Fisher at 212/838-2596

www.laurafisherquilts.com

fisherheritage@yahoo.com

find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts

--- On Thu, 1/3/13, Leah Zieber <leah.zieber@verizon.net> wrote:

From: Leah Zieber <leah.zieber@verizon.net> Subject: [qhl] RE: Woven Coverlets, weavers and materials To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Date: Thursday, January 3, 2013, 6:07 PM

I have a quick question that I hope doesn't sound silly.

When itinerant weavers came to town, did they use materials provided by the person purchasing the coverlet or did they provide both service and materials?

I have looked through several of my books and I don't have a clear answer. Some of the books talk about the materials being home spun, but they don't say who provided them.

Just wondering and didn't want to assume it was the household who would purchase the coverlet that provided the materials.

Thanks and if you have a reference it would make my answer all that much better.

Leah Z in chilly SoCal!

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Subject: RE: Woven Coverlets, weavers and materials From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieber@verizon.net> Date: Fri, 04 Jan 2013 13:08:48 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

Thank you for your help Laura - for anyone interested, American Quilts and Coverlets has some lovely examples of the different types of woven coverlets. It's nice to see them page after page so they can be compared.

Leah Z.

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Subject: RE: Woven Coverlets, weavers and materials From: candace@schwenkfelder.com Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2013 08:51:47 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

I've always wondered about the whole idea of itinerant weavers, and hauling looms around, unless the assumption is that there was a loom in the area for him to use. I think among our Germans here in PA they stayed put! Any insight into that? Candace Perry

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Subject: RE: Woven Coverlets, weavers and materials From: Xenia Cord <xenia@legacyquilts.net> Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2013 19:35:28 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

I agree; the professional (jacquard) weavers in Indiana during the 19th century had their businesses at their homes, and most of them also farmed to keep body and soul together. Weaving was not a full- time job for most of them. Some would accept the customer's dyed yarn when she chose a pattern from his draft book for her bedcovering, but some weavers insisted on their own yarn, or at least their own dyeing, so they could be confident of the finished product that, after all, had their names woven into the corners.

Xenia

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Subject: trying once more: correct link to Joyce Gross Quilt Treasure portrait From: megmaxc@aol.com Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2013 11:26:30 -0500 (EST)

As has been said, Joyce Gross made enormous contributions to the field of quilt documentation and history, leaving behind a solid legacy that will help future historians appreciate the country's remarkable 20th century quilt renaissance.

You can get many details about her work and also watch a short documentary that includes an interview with Joyce on the Quilt Alliance website. She was among about 15 individuals chosen as "Quilt Treasures" by the nonprofit Quilt Alliance, which produced these online portraits in collaboration wi th the Michigan State University Museum and MATRIX: Center for Humane Arts, Letters and Social Sciences Online.

Here is the link to the Joyce Gross tribute: http://www.allianceforamericanquilts.org/treasures/main.php?id3D5-16-5.

gratefully, Meg Cox, president, Quilt Alliance

www.megcox.com President, Quilt Alliance Find me on Facebook

Read the latest issue of Quilt Journalist Tells All!

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: January 03, 2013 From: Trishherr@aol.com Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2013 17:48:26 -0500 (EST)

The term "itinerant weavers" is really not historically accurate. Weavers, with their need for room sized looms and warping frames etc. to produce their products, had their own shops, often in a room in the home or an attached or outer building. They did not travel from home to home.

Here in Pennsylvania there were weavers with their own shops located in small settlements throughout the Commonwealth, particularly in SE Pa. Examining census records clearly reveals this. Also Ohio, New York, Indiana, and Canada to name but a few of the areas where coverlets were made.

There are a number of books that accurately record this: "American Coverlets and Their Weavers,"Clarita S. Anderson, The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation; "A Checklist of American Coverlet Weavers, John W. Heisey, The Colonial Williamsburg Foundation; "Coverlets and the Spirit of America," Joseph D. Shein, Schiffer; "Keep Me Warm One Night" Burnham and Burnham, University of Toronto Press, and many others out there.

These are informative excellent reference books on coverlets you might want to check out.

Trish Herr

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Subject: Woven coverlets on Pinterest From: Debby Kratovil <kratovil@his.com>

I've lately been drawn to Pinterest as a wealth of resources and images of quilts within a theme (ie, hexagon quilts, dresden plates, etc). Seeing the post today about coverlets gave me the thought to do a search for "woven coverlets" and - wow!! - did I come up with a fantastic find! Go see for yourself.

I have two coverlets books and two collections from Windham of the reproduction fabrics. I have briefly visited the Coverlet Museum in Bedford, PA and I'd love to go back. But if you just want a lot of eye candy in one place, check out the Pinterest Boards. And you can find other antique quilts within a theme or even a wild card "antique quilts" will bring up zillions of images.

This Pinterest thing is new to me, but being able to use it for searches like this, I think I can get hooked! Debby

Debby (with a "y" and not "ie") Kratovil http://debbykratovilquilts.blogspot.com/ Quilt Trunk Shows & Workshops www.quilterbydesign.com

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Subject: Coverlets From: "Vivien Sayre" <vsayre@nesa.com> Date: Sat, 5 Jan 2013 09:50:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Speaking of Coverlets, I have three that I have decided to sell. Does anyone know the best place to do that? Please contact me privately.

Thank you, Vivien Sayre, Massachusetts

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Subject: RE: Woven Coverlets, weavers and materials From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgw@msn.com>

I am only asking this out of ignorance and it will be obvious. But is it po ssible that there were more portable looms than the big room-sized ones? I am thinking of the weaving of Navajo rugs and photos I've seen of those bei ng made and that's why I ask. The other thing that made me wonder is a diff erent object in a museum here in Nebraska that I didn't know existed. It wa s a small portable pump organ. Fascinated me and gave a great visual for all those dances in homes that I've read about. All the places that little organ had probably been. So I wondered about the looms. Probably not possi ble and as I said I'm certain I'm showing my ignorance by raising the question. But at least I explained why it came to mind :-). Of course if c overlets had been woven in narrower strips that would be obvious to text ile historians wouldn't it ... Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: RE: Woven Coverlets, weavers and materials From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Sat, 5 Jan 2013 11:08:30 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 4

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I don't know how portable any loom was, but if youare familiar with 19th century multi panel coverlets you will see some variation in the width of thepanel from one coverlet to another - some I've had were of pane ls around 2' wide, some around 3' wide. I've hadovershot coverlets made joining two widths, others three, some evenwith four or five panels . Also, there were tabletoptextiles wovenin several panels of even na rrower width. German and Scandinavian woolenwoven coverlets I have conta in narrower width panels than American counterparts.I don't know if a ny bookanalyzes allthis, but those Trish recommended contain excellen tinformation.

Laura Fisher at 212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts

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Subject: RE: Woven Coverlets, weavers and materials From: textiqueaol.com

There have been hundreds of loom designs discovered. I would recommend "Th e Book of Looms" by Eric Broudy. The finer the thread and the simpler the loom, the more hand-work and time is involved, working over and under the w arp threads. Navaho rugs were woven using a tapestry twill which meant eac h color was added - separately - in each row (hence, the 'lazy line', also seen on some hand woven shawls). More complicated draw looms lifted specif ic warp threads in a group so the weft could be thrown across in one pass. It saved an enormous amount of time but required a large, counter-balanced mechanism.

Jan Thomas

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Subject: Looms From: "Greta VanDenBerg" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Sun, 6 Jan 2013 08:40:14 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi Stephanie,

First, let me clarify that I am not an expert by any means but have dabbled in recent years as part of my 'textile' education.

Looms have been made in all shapes and sizes for centuries. Among some of the oldest are Rigid Heddle looms which are far more portable than a traditional floor loom. There more traditional style looms (the design most of us probably think of when we think of a loom); they can be small enough to fit on a table top and have multiple heddles. What designs can be woven is dependent upon the number of heddles a loom has. Overshot can be woven on a loom with as few as four heddles.

I would be happy to clarify some of the details if anyone is interested with a friend of mine who has far more expertise on this topic than I do. She is a long-time spinner and weaver well-versed in history of her craft. She is not on this list. I have a number of books she has recommended, however, because my studio is undergoing a major renovation all of my books are packed. I will see Betty week so I will ask lots of questions and take notes. If she is willing, which I am sure she would be, I will put anyone interested in this topic in contact with her directly.

Happy New Year to everyone!

Greta Van Den Berg http://splintersenthreads.blogspot.com/

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Subject: Joyce Gross Tribute From: megmaxcaol.com Date: Sat, 5 Jan 2013 16:14:31 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 2

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CFB9A0C9E80405_12B0_3F1E0_webmail-d049.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset"us-ascii"

Well, after 3 failures, I still cannot explain why the link to the Joyce Gross Quilt Treasures portrait is taking folks to Virginia Avery's instead. But for those who would like to check it out, here is the link to the Alliance's website homepage, where you can find out more: http://www.allianceforamericanquilts.org/. I apologize for the glitch! warmly, Meg Cox, Quilt Alliance president

www.megcox.com Princeton, NJ Find me on Facebook

Read the latest issue of Quilt Journalist Tells All!

Video trailer for my new book!

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Subject: More looms From: tigersouplisco.com Date: Sun, 6 Jan 2013 11:33:24 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Here in Iowa, lots of women earned extra money by weaving rag rugs with a simple loom. (I suppose these looms would be considered the red haired stepchild of serious weavers) But those rugs were durable, and the only thing between a person's feet and a cold country house in the winter. I can remember Mom's simple 4 harness loom was in the basement, and I was initiated into the process by winding interminable balls of cloth strips cut from old overalls, aprons, etc. I also remember that on the day that Mom had to put new warp threads in the loom, you didn't make any rash remarks about "when will supper be ready?" Ah the memories! Shirley Mc ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: looms From: Polly Greene <pjgreeneeastlink.ca> Date: Mon, 07 Jan 2013 11:30:22 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

There were itinerant weavers who travelled around in the winter boarding at client's houses for however long it took to weave the articles they wanted from their own handspun wool. Mostly blankets and coating or suiting material. Not necessarily coverlets. Nearly every house had a loom -- sometimes they were actually built into the loft over the kitchen as part of the house! So, no, they didn't carry their own looms around with them. Blankets, coverlets, even rugs were woven in strips since they could only be as wide as an arm's reach in order to throw the shuttle from side to side. It wasn't the number of heddles that determined what type of weave was made but the number of harnesses (the rods that held the heddles) which moved up and down depending on which foot treadles were pressed down. Some householders were able to weave overshot coverlets if they had a four harness loom and had access to cotton or linen warp thread. They would use their own hand-spun wool for the weft. Jaquard coverlets were woven by professional weavers in their own workshops. They were sometimes weavers who had worked in mills until mechanization drove them out of their jobs and they settled in Ohio and Pennsylvania and eventually were driven into Canada by industrialization in those states. Besides Keep Me Warm One Night by Dorothy Burnham there is a book about the Rose family in Rhode Island (he was known as Weaver Rose) which is an enjoyable and informative read. Polly Greene

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Subject: Mourning Quilts From: DDBSTUFFaol.com Date: Tue, 8 Jan 2013 07:03:25 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 1

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Recently, on Facebook's Antique and Vintage Quilts, the term "Mourning Quilt" was tossed around.

I've heard this terminology tossed around for years but have NEVER in my 40 years in the biz, seen any factual documentation on this subject and I've always doubted that there were such quilts.

Who has or has seen the documentation?

Just because a quilt has the color black on it or has a coffin on it, doesn't make it a "Mourning Quilt.

Darwin D. Bearley --part1_17878.494fbc20.3e1d650d_boundary--

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Subject: Mourning quilts From: Sue Reich <suereichcharter.net> Date: Tue, 8 Jan 2013 08:27:21 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

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When we documented in Connecticut, there were quilts brought to us with oral histories as Mourning quilts. In Janet Finley's new book published by Sch iffer, you will find quilts in post mortem settings. Regarding the term, o ther than oral history, I have never found it in Nineteenth or Twentieth cen tury newspapers. http://www.schifferbooks.com/newschiffer/book_template.php?isbn3D9780764342 165 Sue Reich

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Quilt exhibit & retreat From: Karan Flanscha <sadierosecfu.net> Date: Tue, 8 Jan 2013 08:28:34 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

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I wanted to share about a wonderful quilt exhbit in Waterloo, Iowa, at the Grout Museum, and an upcoming retreat. We hope if any of you are in the area, you will visit the exhibit, which is really wonderful! Anyone who wants to join us for the Retreat will have a wonderful time!!

www.groutmuseumdistrict.org

Colors That Complement: Red and Green Quilts The Grout Museum's 20th Annual Quilt exhibit is destined to please the eye with colors that complement a variety of unique designs. Tops stitched from a combination of red and green fabrics, were popular with many mid-19th century quilters, who often considered the finished quilt their best work. Today's stitchers continue this tradition appliqueing red flowers with green flowing vines and leaves, or just using this popular color combination in their pieced work. Learn the history and reasons behind these quilts whose colors have set them apart in a class of their own. This exhibit is open through 4-6-2013.

Annual Cabin Fever Quilt Retreat Jan. 25-26, 2013 *Retreat Teacher/Speaker*

Dawn Hesse is a third-generation quilter and an avid cross stitcher. Inspired by a quilt pattern in a magazine, she bought her first rotary cutter and mat in 1999 and hasn't stopped quilting since. She particularly enjoys needleturn appliquE9 and hand quilting. Her love of traditional designs stems from fond childhood memories of being surrounded by quilts.

Dawn lives in Columbia, Missouri with her two teenage sons and works as a hairstylist. She is a member of the Boonslick Trail Quilters Guild as well as several sewing groups.

Dawn teaches at quilt shops and guilds nationwide. She has designed fabric and has her own pattern company, Linen Closet Designs, which has been featured in publications including Primitive Quilts and Projects magazine.

She has published four books with Kansas City Star Quilts, the most recent titled Inspired. Follow Dawn's quilting adventures and get free quilt patterns at her blog, dawnheesequilts.blogspot.com

More information about the retreat events is available at the Grout website.

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Subject: RE: Mourning Quilts From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Tue, 8 Jan 2013 11:45:59 -0600 X-Message-Number: 4

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There's an article in one of the AQSG's journals about mourning quilts b ut I don't know which issue.Steph Whitson

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Subject: Re: Mourning Quilts From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Tue, 8 Jan 2013 17:55:35 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 5

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Darwin,

I would agree that black does not a mourning quilt make but I would site the "Kentucky Graveyard Quilt" made from her boys school clothes . Also The Nancy Butler quilt at the Smithsonian to name two.

Polly Mello

----- Original Message -----

From: DDBSTUFFaol.com To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Tuesday, January 8, 2013 7:03:25 AM Subject: [qhl] Mourning Quilts

Recently, on Facebook's Antique and Vintage Quilts, the term "Mourning

Quilt" was tossed around.

I've heard this terminology tossed around for years but have NEVER in my 40 years in the biz, seen any factual documentation on this subject a nd I've always doubted that there were such quilts.

Who has or has seen the documentation?

Just because a quilt has the color black on it or has a coffin on it,

doesn't make it a "Mourning Quilt.

Darwin D. Bearley

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Subject: RE: Mourning Quilts From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>

Bill Volckening has also been kind enough to share info and photos about hi s c. 1790 Willow Tree Mourning quilt recently and has promised to bring it to the IQSCM Symposium in April. best, Don_________

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Subject: Re: Mourning Quilts From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>

I seem to remembersome narrow quilts, like the size of hired hands bed o r trundle quilts, referred to as 'coffin covers',and thinknarrow o nes were referred to alsoas 'wake table' quilts, bothquilts rel ated to death traditions.. Dont know if they were a general item made to aw ait a death, or made for a specific departed one.

Laura Fisher at 212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts

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Subject: RE: Mourning Quilts From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>

The database of Uncoverings from the first issue in 1980 can be found on the AQSG site under publications. It's an excel file - you can search keyword column, titles, authors etc with a drop down box in each column.

Jean Carlton

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Subject: RE: Mourning Quilts From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com>

The issue of black and white being a mourning quilt ... I'd add that when m y quilt group made a quilt for my step-son's marriage we chose black and white because we knew the couple would love all the graphic stuff with all the great new prints that were out at the time. We also sneaked in a pi ece of his mother's wedding gown (which was polyester-ish satin-ish made by her) ... and so I suppose that's a combination wedding/mourning quilt s ince my step-son's mother passed away in 1996. Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: RE: Woven Coverlets, weavers and materials From: candaceschwenkfelder.com Date: Sun, 6 Jan 2013 13:45:05 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

Stephanie -- our 18th and 19th century PA looms are large and heavy, and though in theory I guess they could be moved, in practice, as Trish pointed out, it wasn't done. I'm not sure what you mean by a portable pump organ -- we actually have a pump organ with handles on it that would take a least two men to move, which I suppose is portable -- but it's still hugely heavy. We also have a small melodeon that is portable -- the legs actually fold underneath it, but it's a much different sound than an organ. Have a look at the website of the National Coverlet Museum in Bedford, PA -- there may be some photos there that help explain. Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Mourning Quilts From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2013 18:24:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

Dear All,

If this response shows up days after the discussion of mourning quilts is over, please excuse me. For some reason, my messages to QHL are always very delayed.

Anyway, I know of at least two crazy quilts that are without a doubt mourning quilts--one is published in _Massachusetts Quilts: Our Common Wealth_, and was made by Henrietta Lambie of Northampton for her two little daughters, with symbols and colors of mourning, and bits of the girls' clothing. It came to Historic Northampton with a letter documenting that it was made as a mourning quilt, with blocks contributed by "sympathetic friends." A second crazy quilt--what I consider to be the "mother of all crazy quilts" is not yet published, but is in the collection of the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art. It was made by Signora May of Hartford, Connecticut, as a memorial to her three deceased children. Their names are embroidered on the quilt. It is the most extraordinary crazy quilt I've ever seen.

All best, Lynne

> ...the term "Mourning Quilt" was tossed around. I've heard this terminology tossed around for years but have NEVER in my 40 years in the biz, seen any factual documentation on this subject and I've always doubted that there were such quilts.

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Subject: Mourning quilt From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ssyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 8 Jan 2013 17:14:47 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 12

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On the subject of mourning quilts, I am of the mind that we might be talkin g of 2 different things. On the one hand, there are quilts that are clea rly made in memory of someone. I think of them as being made by family o r friends to comfort the bereaved during their time of mourning, perhaps to elicit happy memories of the beloved.

I also am aware that many people find solace in needlework in times of stre ss or loss. The process of working regularly on a meaningful project off ers peace and respite from mourning, and can help a person heal over time. That is what comes to mind when I think of a mourning quilt. It woul dn't necessarily include drab or black colors only, just serve the purpose of helping to get through grief. There are probably more quilts than we ever knew which were made with sadness. If we knew all of those stories, it could break our hearts. Susan

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Subject: Re: Mourning quilt From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Wed, 9 Jan 2013 01:52:04 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 13

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I agree with you Sue.

Polly Mello

I also am aware that many people find solace in needlework in times of stre ss or loss. The process of working regularly on a meaningful project offers peace and respite from mourning, and can help a person heal over tim e. That is what comes to mind when I think of a mourning quilt. It wouldn't necessarily include drab or black colors only, just serve the purpose of helping to get through grief. There are probably more quil ts than we ever knew which were made with sadness. If we knew all of those stories, it could break our hearts. Susan

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Subject: RE: Woven Coverlets, weavers and materials From: textiqueaol.com Date: Tue, 8 Jan 2013 21:07:53 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 14

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....said Coverlet Museum also has a yahoo list where yummy weaving things a re discussed.

Jan Thomas

Have a look at the website of the National Coverlet Museum in Bedford, PA - - there may be some photos there that help explain. Candace Perry Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

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Subject: mourning quilts From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 8 Jan 2013 19:55:29 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 15

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I seem to remember that some narrow quilts, like the size of hired hands be d or trundle bed quilts, were referred to as 'coffin covers', and alsoas 'wake table' quilts, both related to death traditional practices so per haps in the category that would be considered 'mourning' quilts.

Don't know if they were a general item made to await any death in a family, or if it was made for a specific departed one.

Laura Fisher at 212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com

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Subject: mourning quilts From: Neva Hart <nevahartverizon.net> Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2013 07:21:55 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

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Re "mourning" being assigned to quilts, I appraised a quilt made from dresses worn by family members during a mourning period mid-1800s in Tennessee. The family oral history stated that it was known to them as a mourning quilt. Wasn't late Victorian era the time period when black apparel was worn to signify mourning (meaning mid to end of 19th cent.)?

Lynchburg, Va has a great resource -- The Old City Cemetery and its museum. Besides graves dating from the Revolutionary War, the organization has developed quite a repository of clothing, coffins and customs re death during the 19th cent. (See http://www.gravegarden.org/)

I have also appraised a coffin cover made in the crazy quilt style, according to family history. It was narrow, with "tabs" along the edges, which would have hung over the sides of a coffin.

Neva Hart, Quilt Appraiser Va. Quilt Museum Volunteer & Guest Curator See "HEXED!" - Designs & Dimensions May 21 - August 24, 2013

http://vaquiltmuseum.org/ Harrisonburg, VA

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Subject: Re: Mourning quilt From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Wed, 9 Jan 2013 11:27:39 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

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I was thinking the same thing re "mourning quilt." The definition could be so varied. Any quilt could be a "mourning quilt." There is mention of a qui lt in the Nebraska Quilts and Quiltmakers book about a woman who lost a chi ld and a neighbor brought her fabric and she made the quilt while mourning that child. It's a poignant touching story. I believe that quilt is a cr azy quilt. But how many quilts have been made when people were needing comfort of that sort ... and perhaps it was never called a "mourning quilt" by family b ut it most certainly was IF we define a quilt as a quilt made during a time of mourning. Or is a mourning quilt a quilt made in memory of a recently l ost loved one (or pet)? Or is a mourning quilt a quilt made to be a funeral pall? Definitions .... Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Mourning Quilts From: Edwaquiltaol.com Date: Wed, 9 Jan 2013 08:31:56 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 3

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Several years ago there was an exhibit at the Vermont Quilt Festival of wool whole cloth quilts. There was a smaller quilt displayed on a casket which might meet the criteria of Mourning Quilt. Also. Back in the mid 1990's Betty Boyink (Betty Boyink Publidhing) wrote a small book which I believe had some details of such quilts.

Holice --part1_48216.309ee425.3e1ecb4c_boundary--

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Subject: Re: mourning quilts From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2013 08:35:05 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Mourning clothing was worn for centuries, not just in the second half of the nineteenth century--black for the first stage of mourning, gray, purple, and white for second mourning. There were actually protests and even legislation against wearing mourning (and the custom of giving away gold mourning rings and white leather gloves at funerals) at various points in history because of the extreme expense it could cause, driving families into debt.

Keeping my fingers crossed that this message shows up in a timely manner... I had almost given up participating in the QHL because I never knew if and when my messages would show up!

All best, Lynne

> Wasn't late Victorian era the time period when black apparel was worn to signify mourning (meaning mid to end of 19th cent.)? > >

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Subject: RE: mourning quilts From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Wed, 9 Jan 2013 11:59:28 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

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I second Neva's recommendation of the Lynchburg old city cemetery museum. F ascinating place. I spent several hours there (including the time spent in the cemetery itself). I think I have a pamphlet I bought there in my librar y ... and the docent who was there the day I visited was very knowledgeable . Since I write women's fiction set in the 19th century I've had to study Victorian mourning customs (gotta know how to dress a widow and for how lon g etc. ... and can I send her out on a call or not etc.). It's a topi c of personal fascination probably because I grew up prowling old cemete ries (honest we aren't weird we just love history) and have always be en fascinated by the gorgeous sculpture and endless stories suggested by to mbstones and epitaphs. At any rate you've all suggested a new topic of study which would be the relationship between Victorian mourning customs and the quilts of the e ra. It was such a frenzied industry (IMHO) that surely mourning quilts w ere suggested in print somewhere during that era. The customs in America most certainly made a lot of people a lot of money. Moving funerals out of the home and into funeral parlors happened in that e ra. Mourning properly was not cheap. Dresses veils gloves coats jewelry stationery wreaths memorial cards the photographic pro cess that could affix a photograph to porcelain and mount it on a tombstone and so on. The horrible death toll during the Civil War would have turn ed the streets of towns very dark--literally--with veiled women dressed in black for months at a time. I found an interesting reference from a Nebraska milliner/dressmaker who ha d a printed list ready for her clients to tell them "the basics" that she s uggested for the first year and if someone took her advice she made a ni ce little bit of money. Now you've all got me back to thinking I should develop a lecture on the to pic. Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: mourning customs and quilts From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 9 Jan 2013 10:12:34 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 6

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Stephanie -- hw about writing up your research on mourning and quilts for Unvcoverings or Blanket Statements, not just for a local lecture! That way more of us can see and learn. seems like you have a great head start. Queen Victoria popularized the custom of black mourning attire and such, I think I saw on a pbs special, so maybe check Victoria and Albert Museum archives for info.

Laura Fisher at

212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts ---503442473-1167300286-1357755154:56377--

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Subject: RE: mourning quilts From: "Kathy Moore" <kmoore81austin.rr.com> Date: Wed, 9 Jan 2013 12:16:41 -0600 X-Message-Number: 7

Always thinking, aren't you. It would probably make for a very interesting program. I hope you'll do it.

Have you been watching the Downton Abbey series on PBS? I'm addicted to it. The attention to detail is amazing. And the story, it's a little soap opera-ish, but great fun.

Wanted to let you know that I just talked to Jack Beasley at the KC Star and ordered one more box of books. He's down to one pallet...approximately 1100 books left. He casually commented that that book has sold well and he wouldn't be surprised if they want to do a reprint. Wouldn't that be a kick in the pants!!!

Hope all is well there and the winter is being kind. We've gotten much needed rain in the last 36 hours or so...up to 2.5 inches at the house. Don't know yet, but am hoping the rain fell in the watersheds where the lakes really need it. Our lakes are down to 40% of capacity and desperately need every drop of the rain we're getting.

Praying for rain and hoping for the best,

Kath

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Subject: Re: mourning customs and quilts From: pollymellocomcast.net

I have agreed to do a Study Center for AQSG this September in Charleston So uth Carolina"Midnight in the Garden of Quilts" It is divided into sev eral sections, one is the Mourning quilts and Coffin Drapes. Itwill b e , I hope this will bean interesting place to have this discussion.

Other topics will be, Presidential Demise and Assassinations, Quilts and ne edleworkfeaturingtragic Current Events: The Lindburgh Kidnappin g, The sinking of the Titanic, Haley's Comet. Also, quilts about creepy cre atures, Snakes, Spiders, Rats, Alligators, And crib quilts with troubling t heme's.

I have done a trunk show/lectureand written articles for Quilte rs Newsletter Magazine about these quilts for over a decade. Many of the qu ilts are rarely if ever seenanywhere else.

I rarely take them out of the Mid Atlantic area.

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland

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Subject: RE: mourning quilts From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com>

Please forgive my faux pas in sending a personal e-mail to kathy moore to t his list.And honestly....just delete without reading.I'm SO embarrassed.Ste phanie Whitson

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Subject: Re: mourning customs and quilts From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2013 12:33:25 -0800 X-Message-Number: 10

Polly - that all sounds amazing... so looking forward to South Carolina!

Sent: Wednesday, January 09, 2013 12:01 PM

To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Re: mourning customs and quilts

I have agreed to do a Study Center for AQSG this September in Charleston South Carolina"Midnight in the Garden of Quilts" It is divided into several sections, one is the Mourning quilts and Coffin Drapes. Itwill be , I hope this will bean interesting place to have this discussion.

Other topics will be, Presidential Demise and Assassinations, Quilts and needleworkfeaturingtragic Current Events: The Lindburgh Kidnapping, The sinking of the Titanic, Haley's Comet. Also, quilts about creepy creatures, Snakes, Spiders, Rats, Alligators, And crib quilts with troubling theme's.

I have done a trunk show/lectureand written articles for Quilters Newsletter Magazine about these quilts for over a decade. Many of the quilts are rarely if ever seenanywhere else.

I rarely take them out of the Mid Atlantic area.

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland

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Subject: Re: mourning customs and quilts From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Wed, 9 Jan 2013 15:04:40 -0600 X-Message-Number: 11

Dear snake sister, I am coming to Charleston!!! I will be so unbelievably diappointed if I do nto get into one of your study centers or lectures!!! s-s-s--s Me

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Subject: Re: mourning customs and quilts From: pollymellocomcast.net

I hope to see you too my SsssnakeSssssister Kalake.

Polly

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Subject: RE: Paper Pieces followup From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi all - wanted to follow up on my pattern problems!

I want to give a shout out to Paperpieces.com I contacted them about making a custom order for my 8 pointed star with the octagon center and they are going to do it and make it available to everyone. I'll post the link in a week or so. Yeah! They are great!

Leah Zieber

Zieber Quilts

https://www.facebook.com/zieber.quilts

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Subject: Re: Mourning quilt From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Wed, 9 Jan 2013 17:04:25 -0500 X-Message-Number: 14

There is a sort of mourning quilt that is made of the ribbons from the funeral flowers - a Southern tradition, I believe, and best done when ribbons were real silk and not acetate as they are today.

Xenia

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Subject: Re: mourning customs and quilts From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Wed, 9 Jan 2013 16:10:19 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 15

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sign me up for yours! It will be great for us to see your select unique dis coveries

Laura Fisher at 212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts

--- On Wed, 1/9/13, pollymellocomcast.net <pollymellocomcast.net> wrote:

From: pollymellocomcast.net <pollymellocomcast.net> Subject: [qhl] Re: mourning customs and quilts To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Date: Wednesday, January 9, 2013, 3:00 PM

I have agreed to do a Study Center for AQSG this September in Charleston So uth Carolina"Midnight in the Garden of Quilts" It is divided into severa l sections, one is the Mourning quilts and Coffin Drapes. Itwill be , I hope this will bean interesting place to have this discussion.

Other topics will be, Presidential Demise and Assassinations, Quilts and ne edleworkfeaturingtragic Current Events: The Lindburgh Kidnapping, The sinking of the Titanic, Haley's Comet. Also, quilts about creepy creatures , Snakes, Spiders, Rats, Alligators, And crib quilts with troubling theme's .

I have done a trunk show/lectureand written articles for Quilters New sletter Magazine about these quilts for over a decade. Many of the quilts a re rarely if ever seenanywhere else.

I rarely take them out of the Mid Atlantic area.

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland

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Subject: Re: mourning customs and quilts From: pollymellocomcast.net

It would be great to have you there Laura.

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland

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Subject: Re: mourning customs and quilts From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Wed, 9 Jan 2013 22:28:32 -0500 (EST)

Oh, Polly, I hope to get your talk in the lottery. It just sounds too good to miss. Your Bowie cousin, Janet

In a message dated 1/9/2013 2:01:13 P.M. Central Standard Time, pollymellocomcast.net writes:

I have agreed to do a Study Center for AQSG this September in Charleston South Carolina "Midnight in the Garden of Quilts" It is divided into several sections, one is the Mourning quilts and Coffin Drapes. It will be , I hope this will be an interesting place to have this discussion.

Other topics will be, Presidential Demise and Assassinations, Quilts and needlework featuring tragic Current Events: The Lindburgh Kidnapping, The sinking of the Titanic, Haley's Comet. Also, quilts about creepy creatures, Snakes, Spiders, Rats, Alligators, And crib quilts with troubling theme's.

I have done a trunk show/lecture and written articles for Quilters Newsletter Magazine about these quilts for over a decade. Many of the quilts are rarely if ever seen anywhere else.

I rarely take them out of the Mid Atlantic area.

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland

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Subject: Re: mourning customs and quilts From: JLHfwaol.com

I second Laura's motion. A paper for AQSG would be welcome. Janet H in Fort Worth recovering from a month of health problems

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: January 08, 2013 From: Beth Donaldson <bethdonaldsonquiltmakergmail.com>

There is a new group on facebook where we're talking about quilt documentation. If you're currently documenting quilts or if you have documented quilts in the past, please join us. You can find us here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/quiltdocumentation/

Beth

Beth Donaldson bethdonaldsonquiltmakergmail.com

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Subject: Mourning Quilts From: "Greta VanDenBerg" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2013 09:43:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Perhaps this one has already been referenced but here is a link to another 'Mourning Quilt' clearly recognizing the passing of Nancy Ward Butler. It is in the collection of the Smithsonian - http://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/search/object/nmah_556595

Greta Van Den Berg http://splintersenthreads.blogspot.com/

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Subject: RE: Mourning Quilts From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2013 11:11:25 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

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Has anyone studied the type of quilt like nancy Ward Butler's? The ones whe re patchwork creates a worded message? I remember seeing many over the year s and I've wondered if that "trend" or "style" has been studied.stephanie W hitson

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Subject: SAVE THE THIMBLE From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2013 11:14:24 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Dear Fellow QHL-ers! I am starting a campaign amond all quilters and others to save the thimble! Hasbro Games has decided to retire one of the game tokens in the board game Monopoly. It is entirely dependent on voting to keep your favorite token. The thimble token is in great danger of being retired! We need to mobilize and save the thimble. One of the morning show hosts even said on the air"Get rid of the thimble; no one uses it anyway." I was outraged and feel we need to save the thimble. Remembering what we were able to do with Northern Bath tissue ad, I feel we can do it again! You need to go o facebook and go to the Monopoly page. www.facebook.com/monopoly and vote there. You will be able to vote to save the thimble and also vote for a new token to replace the one being eliminated. Savannah Guthrie on the today show is in favor of saving the thimble so let's go with her and do it. You will be able to vote once a day. Please pass this on to your guild members, and anyone you can think of to save the thimble. Marcia Kaylakie in Austin TX who owns several thimbles and proudly uses them. ------_NextPart_000_0005_01CDEF23.A5A12E30--

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Subject: RE: Mourning Quilts From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2013 11:19:47 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 4

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I included several in my exhibition Text on Textiles: Words as Design in An tique Quilts. If I had to summarize the discoveries, I could draw two quick conclusions: more were religious/Bible phrases than anything else, and one person sometimes made several of this type of wording quilt. (I found seve ral similar examples which must have been separated at birth) I don't know if this quilt form was a trend in any particular community. Rather I think they weremade by fervently religious people who expressedher belief o ncloth rather than on paper. I don't know that anyone had done research toexplore this subcategory; when I did my show I was pulling together un usualvisual imagesfor display, not doing background searches on the m akers. Probably organizations like the Methodist Episcopal Ladies Aid Socie ty were a sourceof several in red and white. Joanna Rose showed several in her Infinite Variety exhibition.The earliest I have seen is a pieced postage stamp-y top in the collection of Historic Deerfield, done in the m anner of an alphabet quilt from the 1920s in red and white that I own (on m y

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Subject: Shrouds, Coffin Quilts & Mouring Quilts From: OzarkQuiltmakeraol.com

Hi:

Here's my understanding of shrouds, coffin quilts and mourning quilts.

In the days of Jesus, a corpse was annointed with oil and fragrant herbs and wrapped in burial bandages. A shroud refers to the cloth covering that went directly on a corpse, after it was wrapped for burial (think Shroud of Turin.)

Covers for coffins are often referred to as palls. They became common in the Middle Ages. Originally the wealthy had expensive fabric in bright colors that was ornately decorated or woven with patterns. The church then decided that everyone was equal in the eyes of God so their coffins should be covered equally the same with a simple pall. At first the palls were black and later they became white. They could be decorated with a large cross that went from side to side and top to bottom of the pall. After burial, the pall was given to the church and it was used to cover the sacraments (so the cloth over communion trays is also called a pall.)

Today, military and presidential funerals use an American flag as the pall over the casket. The pall that was used on Princess Diana's coffin was draped in the Royal Standard of the United Kingdom.

The Civil War caused our country to think a lot about death and dying. By the time of the Victorian Era, there was a return to elaborate coffin covers. They were the size of a coffin so they would drape over the top and hang down the sides and ends. It's my understood that families made these covers so they could be repeatedly used for family funerals. I remember seeing one on display at the National Quilt Museum about 12 or 13 years ago. It was ornate and had some Odd Fellow symbols on it. I also know of one that is in a private collection.

I belong to an art quilt group in Springfield, Missouri. In 2009, we made a coffin quilt. It is called "Good Grief." You just gotta love that name. We each made two blocks for the quilt (one for each side) and a panel with our names embroidered down the center. It is reversible (based on the colors - hot colors on one side, cool colors on the other.) It will be used on our individual coffins when we each pass on.

There was an article about our Good Grief quilt in Quilters Newsletter last year. We also published a book about it so if you want to purchase a copy of the book, I have copies. Just email me off-list. Here's a link to our web site where you can see the quilt.

_http://www.uncommthreads.com/Uncommon_Threads/Projects.html_ (http://www.uncommthreads.com/Uncommon_Threads/Projects.html)

A mourning quilt is different. It was made after the person died as a remembrance quilt or a quilt that was worked on during the grief process. They often have a willow tree, a harp, the deceased person's name or initials and if the person was a child or baby, they may have tiny hands quilted on them somewhere. There are also many mourning samplers from the 19th century. I remember seeing a picture of one that had a man and woman weeping over a casket with a willow tree on each side.

Linda Carlson from Mexico, Missouri has done quite a bit of research on mourning quilts. She wrote a book about contemporary mourning quilts (Quilting to Soothe the Soul - Krause Publications, 2003.) It has lots of photos of modern-day mourning quilts. Other books I have on my shelf are Elizabeth Roseberry Mitchell's Graveyard Quilt by Linda Otto Lipsell (1995) and a book for children called Cemetery Quilt by Kent and Alice Ross (1995.)

Kathy Kansier Teacher, Judge & AQS Certified Appraiser Ozark, Missouri

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Subject: mourning quilts From: <gebelearthlink.net> Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2013 12:07:46 -0800 X-Message-Number: 6

Don -

In addition to Gail Trechsel's paper in Uncoverings, my 1995 paper in Uncoverings covered the subcategory of the use of quilts in death rituals, both made specifically for that purpose and others that were re-purposed. Some quilts were made when a child was born to be used as that child's shroud. My research ranged over a much broader sampling of quilts made as mourning quilts and included those, as referenced by Polly Mellos and Susan Schreurs, which were made while awaiting a death of a loved one and which had therapeutic value to the maker as well as those made afterwards as part of the grieving process. I received some very heartfelt correspondence by those who made these quilts. And yes, most of these quilts did not have black in them. The only way you can identify them is my knowing their stories or if there is an indication of their purpose on the quilt. There is a report of a full set of bed furnishings belonging to an English family that were black and were used in the periods of morning endured by the family. This is one of the few cases of black morning quilts though I know of some American ones made with black and white fabric. In some cases white was used for the mourning quilt. I have more than 200 slides of mourning quilts and their stories. Yes, mourning quilts exist.

Carol W Gebel

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Subject: Pennsylvania-Alabama quilts? From: "Debby/Marc" <resmarcomcast.net> Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2013 15:44:07 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Has everyone heard the comment that James Carville used to make that politically, Pennsylvania was Philadelphia and Pittsburgh with Alabama in between? Well, take a look at some of the quilts in a sale Friday the 11th at grassmyerauction.com and expand the definition to textiles. Down near the bottom of the auction pictures you'll see some quilts that show the aesthetic characteristics often assigned to Southern quilts. There's improvisational patterning, random piecing, "unplanned" combinations, just about everything except bright colors. Eye-opening! Debby Cooney

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Subject: RE: Mourning Quilts From: lynnelynnezwoolsey.com Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2013 15:58:35 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

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There was an exhibition on the subject at the American Folk Art Museum about...6 or 7?... years ago. It was written up in their magazine, /Folk Art, /by curator Stacy Hollander.

All best, Lynne

> Has anyone studied the type of quilt like Nancy Ward Butler's? The ones where patchwork creates a worded message?

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Subject: Re: mourning quilts From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2013 23:45:47 +0000 X-Message-Number: 9

A friend who lives in the Yorkshire Dales has been shown long, thin, white wholecloth quilts from bottom drawers which have been kept many years for family use on coffins. Occasionally she has been shown these nice 'table runners' by newer owners and doesn't always have the heart to tell them what they are.

Sally Ward

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Subject: RE: Mourning Quilts From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2013 17:45:40 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 10

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The exhibit was callled I think Talking Quilts, and had Cy Nelson's PIETIES quilt by Hubbard (written up in many publications, in red and white) and m y GATHER UP THE FRAGMENTS quilt (attached) both with wording of biblical in spiration, I think they were the only two with lots of text as I recall. St acy does wonderful informative captions, so you could probably contact her for more information.Laura Fisher atFISHER HERITAGE305 East 61st Street5th floorNew York, NY 10065212/838-2596www.lau rafisherquilts.comfisherheritageyahoo.comfind us on facebook:

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Subject: RE: Mourning Quilts From: textiqueaol.com

Julie Silber's Margaret Culp Blosser quilt "Stormy Day" was in this exhibit . It has a lot of text on it. Kyra's Barbie quilt was in it too. Stacy wrote a great article about the e xhibit.

Jan Thomas

The exhibit was callled I think Talking Quilts, and had Cy Nelson's PIETIES quilt by Hubbard (written up in many publications, in red and white) and my GATHER UP THE FRAGMENTS quilt (atta ched) both with wording of biblical inspiration, I think they were the only two with lots of text as I recall.

Laura Fisher

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Subject: Re: Pennsylvania-Alabama quilts? From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>

and the sock monkeys look exhausted. wonder how many of these PA quilts are going to become African American and get put up on ebay!

Laura Fisher at 212/838-2596 www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritageyahoo.com find us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts

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Subject: Mourning Quilts From: Marsha MacDowell <macdowelmsu.edu>

In some Native American communities AD particularly in the US Plains AD quilt s are an important element of funerals, burials, and memorials. See MacDowell and Dewhurst, To Honor and Comfort: Native Quilting Traditions. Others hav e also written of this.

Marsha MacDowell Michigan State University Museum Director, The Quilt Index

--B_3440732481_28004562--

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Subject: What are you currently Indexing? From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2013 23:14:47 -0800 X-Message-Number: 2

Are you currently indexing something or have you indexed quilt history information in the past?

What about the Quilt engagement calendar series? Has anyone ever scanned the whole Quilt engagement calendar series of quilt photos into their computer? Or at the very list, made of an Excel spread sheet of the names of the quilt, when made, the owner etc?

Has anyone tried doing anything similar with any quilt "picture" book? How could such a data base of collected images or lists of quilts mentioned in quilt history books be of value to us as quilt historians? This of course would be a personal data base for analytical purposes only and not for public consumption as the images are copyrighted.

Just a passing thought more than once. Have thought about it for sometime but would like to hear other's feedback on the idea of how such a personal project might turn into a research project whose outcome could be shared in someway.

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Indian Head From: Jeanne Jabs <jeanne53507yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 12 Jan 2013 19:01:38 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 1

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Just googled Indian Head Fabric to explain to someone what it was, Joan Kiplinger and I split lots of ebay finds, she would buy, I would pay her or I would buy and she would pay me, she usually picked out the "good Stuff" so anyway, I still have all that fabric and I was trying to explain what it is so as I googled it look what came up, maybe some or all of you have seen it before but I had not and it made me feel good to know that she was so well known and so down to earth and excited about what she did.

http://info.fabrics.net/a-celebration-of-joan-kiplinger-1933-2009/

And I miss her alot. :(

Jeanne

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Subject: Trimmings?? From: tigersouplisco.com Date: Tue, 15 Jan 2013 14:04:26 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

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Is anyone on this list doing any research on dress trimmings, such as rick rack, fancy cotton braids, etc? If so, if they could contact me privately, I could see if they wanted any of my box of "stuff." Also have research on those companies, such as where and when they had advertisements. At one time I had a collection of over 2000 "women's" periodicals. When I was searching for ads for "cut aways" and other kinds of mail order remnants, I also listed the companies that sold bias tape, dress trimmings, thread, etc. (The bias tape and that information has already found a good home.) No sense in letting this information languish on my shelves if someone may be interested. Shirley Mc in really cold Iowa ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: it's working...SAve the Thimble From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2013 10:43:54 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

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It's working!!! with combined efforts from the Amerocan Quilter's society and others, we are moving the thimble up in the standings! I notice today that the thimble is up to 10%!! this from a start of 7% or so. Remember, keep voting daily to SAVE THE THIMBLE!!! Marcia Kaylakie ------_NextPart_000_0003_01CDF3D6.614B05F0--

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Subject: Levi Strauss quilt collection is in storage From: Pepper Cory <pepcoryclis.com> Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2013 17:01:25 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

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Recently got this email back from an inquiry--Samantha at Levi Strauss--too bad that the Strauss collection isn't listed on the Quilt Index. Anyone here want to take a crack at them and ask them to get the collection up on QI?

Samantha here from Levi Strauss & Co. Thanks for reaching out to us.

The Levi Strauss quilt collection is a private collection that was once displayed throughout the entire headquarters in San Francisco. That collection is no longer displayed and is currently in storage. There has never been any official publications - pattern books or art collections books - that featured the Levi Strauss quilt collection. Unfortunately, there are no current plans to do so at this time. Thank you for your interest.

Thanks again,

Samantha Levi Strauss & Co. Consumer Relations Case ID: 4043747

For a "behind-the-seams" look at what's going on with Levi Strauss & Co. subscribe to our blog at: http://levistrauss.com/blogs/subscribe

--------------------< you wrote >-------------------- Hello-The subject of the Levi Strauss quilt collection recently came up on a textile collectors' chat list. Does the company still own a collection of quilts? Where might I see pictures of the quilts? Was a pattern book ever done from quilts in the collection? By pattern book, I mean a book that takes the photo of the antique quilt, drafts the pattern, and gives directions as to how to make the piece. I'm a quilt teacher, book author, historian, and collect antique quilts myself so you can understand my interest. Thanks for your attention-Pepper Cory

-- Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

--bcaec5555590fd68fa04d36f041d--

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Subject: Baby Bonnets and Dress From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2013 15:36:09 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3

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HI all - wonder if anyone out there collects baby bonnets and baby clothes? I recently got a lovely little c1930s baby quilt and in the box were the two silk bonnets and a little sheer dress. I don't collect clothes like these and would like them to find a new home. First inquiry gets the items - FOR FREE!

Hoping they go to a Doll or Baby Clothes COLLECTOR!

Leah Zieber

Zieber Quilts

zieberquiltsgmail.com

http://www.publishersmarketplace.com/members/Leahzieber/

https://www.facebook.com/zieber.quilts

(951) 440-4808

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Subject: RE: [ReproFabricLovers] Baby Bonnets and Dress From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net> Date: Wed, 16 Jan 2013 17:23:36 -0800 X-Message-Number: 4

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Hello again, the bonnets and dress are now GONE! Whew that was fast!

Leah

Zieber Quilts

zieberquiltsgmail.com

http://www.publishersmarketplace.com/members/Leahzieber/

https://www.facebook.com/zieber.quilts

(951) 440-4808

-----Original Message----- From: ReproFabricLoversyahoogroups.com [mailto:ReproFabricLoversyahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Leah Zieber Sent: Wednesday, January 16, 2013 3:36 PM To: 'Quilt History List'; Reprofabricloversyahoogroups.com Subject: [ReproFabricLovers] Baby Bonnets and Dress

HI all - wonder if anyone out there collects baby bonnets and baby clothes? I recently got a lovely little c1930s baby quilt and in the box were the two silk bonnets and a little sheer dress. I don't collect clothes like these and would like them to find a new home. First inquiry gets the items - FOR FREE!

Hoping they go to a Doll or Baby Clothes COLLECTOR!

Leah Zieber

Zieber Quilts ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Search Old Chelsea Station pamphlets From: "Peggy Keirstead" <pkeirsteadmac.com> Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2013 10:53:09 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I would like to know when pamphlet #1039 in the Old Chelsea Station series was published. Does anybody know, or can you tell me where I can search these pamphlets? I live near Dallas, TX.

Thank you. Peggy Keirstead ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: another coming exhibit From: "Gale Slagle" <glslagcox.net> Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2013 11:56:22 -0800 X-Message-Number: 2

Speaking of Exhibits..... One of my friends mentioned an exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum so I looked it up. Those of you on the East Coast probably already know about this.

Exhibitions: "Workt by Hand": Hidden Labor and Historical Quilts March 15-September 15, 2013 showcases approximately thirty-five American and European quilt masterpieces from the Brooklyn Museum's renowned decorative arts collection.

Yest they spelled Work w/ a "t" (old English?)

Anyway living on the West Coast I probably won't get to see it. But it looks like something those of you on the East Coast won't want to miss????

Happy Groundhog Day! 2-2-13

Cheers Gale Slagle

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Subject: New Quilt History Column From: Sandra Starley <ginghamfrontiernet.net> Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2013 21:25:43 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 1

I have been chosen to do a Quilt History column for the National Quilting A ssociation's Quilting Quarterly magazine. http://nqaquilts.org/qq/

The focus will be on quilt block, pattern history. So if you have a particu lar block/pattern you'll always wondered about, let me know and it may be m y next feature.

The magazine is a good mix of historical/antique quilt information and new quilting designs and techniques.

Here's a link to join (dues are $25): http://nqaquilts.org/membership/

NQA also has a grant program which directly supports:

E280A2Original research into the historical documentation of quilts, qu iltmakers and subjects related to quiltmaking.

E280A2Research on social history related to quilts.

Thanks.

Sandra Starley AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser Moab, Utah my antique and vintage quilts http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com

my art quilts http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com

Sandra Starley AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser Moab, Utah my antique and vintage quilts http://utahquiltappraiser.blogspot.com my art quilts http://starleyquilts.blogspot.com

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Subject: RE: NQA Magazine column From: "Maribeth" <schmitfuchwi.rr.com> Date: Sun, 3 Feb 2013 10:19:37 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

Sandra, I'm so happy to hear that you'll be doing a column with a historical slant. It'll be a fine addition to the NQA magazine. Best of luck.

Maribeth Schmit In historic Cedarburg, WI NQA Certified Quilt Judge www.wiquiltjudge.com

Subject: New Quilt History Column From: Sandra Starley <ginghamfrontiernet.net> Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2013 21:25:43 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 1

I have been chosen to do a Quilt History column for the National Quilting A ssociation's Quilting Quarterly magazine. http://nqaquilts.org/qq/ .........

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Subject: pattern id request From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Mon, 04 Feb 2013 18:29:47 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

An AQS member has asked for help identifying and possibly locating a pattern for this female figure. She provided this link to a Picasa web album photo:

https://picasaweb.google.com/114636788929406312072/Jan13SNS#5837176007658088002

Additional info that might help you locate the photo is "Raincross Quilt members."

Thanks in advance,

Andi in Paducah

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Subject: Re: pattern id request From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2013 01:59:50 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 2

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I believe it is a Dutch Girl. I have and have seen many versions of her. Check my facebook site, I will post some pictures of mi ne.

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland.

----- Original Message -----

From: "Andi" <areynolds220comcast.net> To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Monday, February 4, 2013 7:29:47 PM Subject: [qhl] pattern id request

An AQS member has asked for help identifying and possibly locating a pattern for this female figure. She provided this link to a Picasa web album photo:

https://picasaweb.google.com/114636788929406312072/Jan13SNS#5837176007658088002

Additional info that might help you locate the photo is "Raincross Quilt members."

Thanks in advance,

Andi in Paducah

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Subject: Re: pattern id request From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2013 17:25:16 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 1

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Virginia Vis corrected me. It is "The Windblown Girl".

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland

----- Original Message -----

From: pollymellocomcast.net To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Monday, February 4, 2013 8:59:50 PM Subject: [qhl] Re: pattern id request

I believe it is a Dutch Girl. I have and have seen many versions of her. Check my facebook site, I will post some pictures of mi ne.

Polly Mello

Elkridge, Maryland.

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: February 04, 2013 From: lynnquiltaol.com

AQS member has asked for help identifying and possibly locating a pattern for this female figure.

I have a collection of quilts with the Little Dutch Girl and have written about them on my blog.

http://quilts-vintageandantique.blogspot.com/2011/08/little-girls.html#comment-form

A reader of my blog, found a pattern here.

http://www.free-quilting.com/detail.html?code3DFQ00037&cat_id3D429

Later, Lynn http://quilts-vintageandantique.blogspot.com https://www.facebook.com/groups/quiltsvintageandantique

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Subject: regional quilt study days From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>

Hi all,Is there a regional quilt study group in Wisconsin? Or close t o Wisconsin?Thank you.Judy SchwenderPaducah, KY -- ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: regional quilt study days From: "Miller, Maretta K" <millermkuww.edu> Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2013 22:27:51 +0000 X-Message-Number: 4

Hi, Judy!

Yes there is! http://www.wqsg.org/

And many of us also attend the IIQSG in Kalona, IA, as well. Plus, there i s a new one in northern IL -- haven't made it to that one yet. Perhaps som eone could help out with information on it?

Is there something we can do for you?

Maretta Miller In Janesville, WI, where it's snowing every day!

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Subject: RE: regional quilt study days From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 5 Feb 2013 14:47:16 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 5

- Hi again,I had a contact here at the museum who would really enjoy this, so I told her I would find out about it for her. I'll be sending her th e url.Thank you!Judy Schwender______________________________