Subject: Re: Eliza Ellen Bigham quilt From: Melissa Devin <atypicalquilterthedevins.com> Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2013 12:27:04 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

I just received a response from the owner along with close ups (I mean, up close!) images. I've never uploaded anything to the boards before, but I can try. Or if someone would rather have me forward the three emails, I'd be happy to.

-- Melissa Devin atypicalquilterthedevins.com http://solje.thedevins.com/blog

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Subject: Re: Eliza Ellen Bigham quilt From: Melissa Devin <atypicalquilterthedevins.com> Date: Mon, 18 Feb 2013 12:39:35 -0800 X-Message-Number: 2

One more quick note until I figure out how to upload images, the owner said that he sent it to National Quilt Museum in Paducah, who is currently looking at it.

-- Melissa Devin atypicalquilterthedevins.com http://solje.thedevins.com/blog

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Subject: Quilt related blogs From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Wed, 20 Feb 2013 00:00:21 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

I am curious about how everyone is managing all this new technology and the overwhelming amount of information we have at our disposal these days. How do you manage blogs you would like to read? How many blogs do you read daily? Once a week? What are the 10 top quilt blogs sites you actually manage to read at least once a week?

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: RE: qhl digest: February 20, 2013 From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Thu, 21 Feb 2013 07:08:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Karen said: I am curious about how everyone is managing all this new technology and the overwhelming amount of information we have at our disposal these days. How do you manage blogs you would like to read? How many blogs do you read daily? Once a week? What are the 10 top quilt blogs sites you actually manage to read at least once a week? * * * * My answer to it all, Karen, is that I do not read blogs, or at least not very often. There are not enough hours in each day for me to read and take in all the material that is out there and available. I want time in my life for my own interests. I was actually at a point where I was feeling resentful towards my computer and The Internet, a love/hate relationship. Too much of my own time is here at this keyboard when I ought to be doing other things. It draws me, I want to be here and then I look at the clock and regret the time.

I am trying to cut back on computer time, but I'm not doing tremendously well with it all. I need a proper balance in my life. Do not ever feel an obligation to read things just because they are sent to you. No offense to any of you at all, but there are in fact some days where I delete this digest without reading it. My apologies, of course, but it's not just this group either.

I control this computer, it does not control me. I am a busy person who is an artist, a quilter, a knitter and I even occasionally do such boring things as laundry and housekeeping (as little as I can get away with). I get stressed when the artist, quilters and knitter in me are not given amble time to create and just plain relax. I am here to learn and enjoy and often the computer ends up being too much like work, if that makes any sense, even if I love it. I often reflect on what I did with my time before I had a computer. I quilted much more then and I would prefer to be producing more and reading less. I seek knowledge about quilts, which is why I am here, but I take in what I can on my own schedule.

Finding a balance,

Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

.

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Subject: RE: Quilt related blogs From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Thu, 21 Feb 2013 11:50:53 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 2

Hi Karen. Just saw your pic in Blanket Statements. Nice to see names with faces.

I save blogs to my "Favorites". I have a subdirectory dedicated to quilt blogs. I used to read at least the Barbara Brackman blogs daily but I seem to have fallen off schedule. I do read my blogs weekly.

Top 10 are: Brackman's Grandmother's Votes for Women Brackman's Quilt 1812 War & Piecing Brackman's Material Culture Kay Triplett's Quilt & Textile Collections Bill Volckening Wonky World Quilter's Crossing (local shop) Barbara Schaffer's Quilts, Gravestones and Elusive Ancestors Your blog, of course John Hopper's The Textile Blog

Sue Garman only adds to her blog the beginning of each month.

It seems to me people just aren't adding much to their blogs lately. Maybe spring will bring a burst of new ideas.

Best regards, Sharron

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

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Subject: RE: qhl digest: February 20, 2013 From: kmoore81austin.rr.com Date: Thu, 21 Feb 2013 08:19:02 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

I can second Linda Heminway's very accurate statement. I describes my experience and my feelings to a tee!

Thank you, Linda, for a well written statement.

Kathy Moore Round Rock, TX ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: blogs From: va_bergerhotmail.com Date: Thu, 21 Feb 2013 08:11:43 -0600 X-Message-Number: 4

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Karen I use Google Reader. I "subscribe" to the blogs I want to follow and Reader puts them all in the same spot. I check it and it puts any new blogs on one page. You can save any blogs that you want to go back to. You can click on the heading to go to the actual blog and comment. The thing you miss out on is anything extra they put on the edges of there blog page. I check Reader a couple of times a day. Some blogs I haven't been able to get on Reader. Margo's Cottonopia for example. I was sad to see that she quit blogging--I tried to remember to check her's once a week but sometimes missed because it wasn't in with the others. I'm not where I can get into the nuts and bolts of Reader at the moment but will post a list later. Virginia Berger > I am curious about how everyone is managing all this new technology and t he > overwhelming amount of information we have at our disposal these days. How > do you manage blogs you would like to read? How many blogs do you read > daily? Once a week? What are the 10 top quilt blogs sites you actually > manage to read at least once a week? > > Karen in the Islands 

--_4ff767ba-20a1-414e-a9cb-d7ef600b0c01_--

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Subject: Seeking 1939-1940 New York World's Fair Quilts From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Thu, 21 Feb 2013 17:38:22 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

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I am sending this message on behalf of Lauren Wade, associate show director at AQS -- my colleague. She is a member of this list but is having internet issues at her QHL email address. Her work email is functioning, so please respond to her there: laurenwadeaqsquilt.com.

We both thank you.

Andi in Paducah

From Lauren:

I am in search of 1939-40 New York World's Fair Quilts -- the actual quilts. I am aware of any quilts on the index. I have also had the wonderful help of Merikay Waldvogel. Thank you...Merikay!

In 1939 Good Housekeeping and Macy's had a quilt contest in honor of the New York World's Fair. It was called, "Better Living in the World of Tomorrow". Anne Orr published an article of the top three winners, and how to purchase patterns/kits in Good Housekeeping, August 1939.

1^st Place "Power" -- Mrs. Else G. Heller of Allegheny, PA - Description: Tan whole cloth with appliqued motif in center (in yellow, orange, red & gray)

2^nd Place "Olive Branch" -- Mrs. Roy Barsalou of Dubuque, IA - Description: Appliqued olive branches in alternating squares. Made in two tones of green on white. Symbolizing peace was the theme and was represented by a dove made of stuffed quilting - holding the olive branch;

3^rd Place -- "Universal Power" -- Mrs. W. E. DeNeff of Spokane, Washington - Description: Appliqued and embroidered - made in two tones of blue with white border. Has the world, stars, hemisphere & compass

I have been able to track down the children of Mrs. Roy Barsalou, although her children do not have any idea what happened to the quilt. Her son said he last remembers it being on the guest room bed when she went into a nursing home in Kankakee, IL.

In 1940 the New York World's Fair did an official needlework contest called "America Through the Needle's Eye". It included the following classes: crocheting, knitting and tatting; needlepoint; embroidery, applique and patchwork; rugs and wool afghans.

The first place winner was Bertha Stenge and her "Palm Leaf" quilt.

The third place winner was Florence Lourette of Rochester, NY, with an applique' garden quilt. She was the founder of the Genesee Valley Quilt Club. I have tried to get someone from this guild to contact me without luck.

I am interested in information on the above mentioned quilts, the patterns from the Good Housekeeping article and any additional quilts that I am not aware of. This also includes any of the needlework that was in the contest.

Thank you,

Lauren laurenwadeaqsquilt.com 270-898-7903, Ext. 193

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Subject: Blogs From: va_bergerhotmail.com

For Karen Alexander: I currently am following 39 blogs on Google Reader. Some of my favorites are:B. Brackman's Material Culture Civil War Quilts and Grandmother's Choice: Votes for WomenCollector with a NeedleDeb Rowden's Thrift Shop QuiltsHumble QuiltsInspired by Antique QuiltsLittle Welsh Quilts and other TraditionsQuilts2C EtcWelsh QuiltsI've recently found a new one that is not quilts but is a blog about sewing re-enactor's clothing called The Victorian Needle. Hope that helps.Virginia Berger

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Subject: Re: Seeking 1939-1940 New York World's Fair Quilts From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>

Isold an official entry World's Fair quilt several years ago at a NYC sh ow. I have photos of when it was on display at the show, and also it was pu blished inI think the finalQuilt Engagement Calendar. I think can fin d the calendar in my shop tomorrow, and may have file photos. I likely have the original color transparency to loan for publication.It once h ad an official tag in the lower right corner, but this had been cut off so  thereis no way to learn who made it, sadly, unless someone who sees it r ecognizes it and comes forward.The quilt has 100 squares one for e ach year of the Century of Progress. In each square is the quiltmaker's rep resentation of the most important occurance that year -- in science, techno logy, social issues, and the like - includinghistoriceventslike th e discovery of thetuberculosis bacilli, the laying of the transAtlantic  cable, etc. Every fourth square is either a donkey or an elephant to repres ent the President's party in that year.I sold it to an interior de signer for his client in Boston I think. I could contact him to see if he c ould get the buyer to agree to loan it.Laura Fisher atFISHER HERITAGE305 East 61st Street5th floorNew York, NY 100 65212/838-2596www.laurafisherquilts.comfisherheritageyahoo. comfind us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: blogs From: Sheri Lesh <leshsherigmail.com>

I really love blogs and find them very inspiring, but like all the techie stuff they are a vacuum cleaners on your time. I find if I check my reader daily, I keep up with those I have subscribed to fine. I probably read at least 20-30 blogs maybe more. Not all of them are quilty in nature... I started writing one of my own, when I was in a transition time in my life. I like writing it, don't know if I am that good at it. But it is hugely time consuming to do one well, I think. Or else I am not that efficient, which is entirely possible.

To make this quilt history related somewhat.....I just finished My Dear Jane top a couple weeks ago. I still need to do some inking and embroidery on it with my info and I am going to include our family members that fought in the CW and their info.....my blog link is below if you are inclined to see it. I am going to hand quilt it and hope to get to that shortly. :)

-- Sheri R. Lesh leshsherigmail.com http://4andfifteen.blogspot.com/

Subject: Quilt related blogs From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Wed, 20 Feb 2013 00:00:21 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

I am curious about how everyone is managing all this new technology and the overwhelming amount of information we have at our disposal these days. How do you manage blogs you would like to read? How many blogs do you read daily? Once a week? What are the 10 top quilt blogs sites you actually manage to read at least once a week?

Karen in the Islands

--f46d04016b218f7fbc04d648c7f3--

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Subject: Re: Seeking 1939-1940 New York World's Fair Quilts From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net>

Please keep us posted on what you all discover. This is so exciting.  Just like the 1933 contest!....arden(Ms) Arden Shelton Portl and, OR________________________________ From: Laura Fisher <lau rafisherquiltsyahoo.com>To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis. com> Sent: Thursday, February 21, 2013 5:21 PMSubject: [qhl] Re: Seek ing 1939-1940 New York World's Fair Quilts Isold an official entry World's Fair quilt several years ago at a NYC show. I have photos of when  it was on display at the show, and also it was published inI think the f inalQuilt Engagement Calendar. I think can find the calendar in my shop  tomorrow, and may have file photos. I likely have the original color transp arency to loan for publication.It once had an official tag in the  lower right corner, but this had been cut off so thereis no way to learn who made it, sadly, unless someone who sees it recognizes it and comes for ward.The quilt has 100 squares one for each year of the Century of Progress. In each square is the quiltmaker's representation of the most im portant occurance that year -- in science, technology, social issues, and t he like - includinghistoriceventslike the discovery of thetuber culosis bacilli, the laying of the transAtlantic cable, etc. Every fourth s quare is either a donkey or an elephant to represent the President's party  in that year.I sold it to an interior designer for his client in B oston I think. I could contact him to see if he could get the buyer to agre e to loan it.Laura Fisher atFISHER HERITAGE30 5 East 61st Street5th floorNew York, NY 10065212/838-2596

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Subject: New York World's Fair Quilts From: Betsy Lewis <betsylewis100gmail.com>

For Lauren -

"The third place winner was Florence Lourette of Rochester, NY, with an applique' garden quilt. She was the founder of the Genesee Valley Quilt Club. I have tried to get someone from this guild to contact me without luck."

While I'm not aware of this quilt, you may want to also contact the Rochester Museum & Science Center. They have a relationship with the Genesee Valley Quilt Club and also have approximately 300 quilts. Here is a link about their relationship: http://collections.rmsc.org/Quilts/index.htmland a contact email to the RMSC is Quiltscollections.rmsc.org.

I hope this helps.

Betsy Alderman Lewis Palmyra, NY

--047d7bf0c6f2f3746d04d64f854a--

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Subject: How to make starch in 1863 NC From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com>

Home-made starch

This is an exerpt from the civilianwartimes blog in NC. I thought y'all would enjoy reading this. Lynn Lancaster Gorges, New Bern, NC

In the present state of the corn, as good starch can be made of it as any housewife needs. Grate it from the ear, mix the pulp thoroughly with cold water, and strain it through a sieve. Let the liquor settle and, pouring off the water, which will be discolored, the start will be found at the bottom of the vessel in a rather soft cake. Pour on more water, stir it up, and repeat the process. At each repetition the cake will be found firmer. And when the water comes off clear and the starch is free from a pink or yellow tinge on the top, the process is complete, except for drying. I never knew but one miscarriage, and that was in warm weather, when the water was not cold enough, or was allowed to stand too long, and the mass fermented. A grater can be made from an old coffee pot or tin bucket, by punching it (outward) full of holes 96 a hammer and nail will answer the purpose 96 and taking it to a piece of board.

*Source:* *Field and Fireside, *February 7, 1863, as found in John Hammond Moore, ed., *The Confederate Housewife* (Columbia, SC: Summerhouse Press, 1997).

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Subject: Mourning quilt re Newtown, CT tragedy From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>

Hi everyone, I have posed at the QHL gallery website a photo of the just fi nished (all by hand) Mourning Quilt I made to commemorate the tragic events at Newtown, CT on 12-14-12.

It will be on view for three days at the International Quilt Museum and Cen ter Symposium the last weekend in April.

However, I am willing to both allow the image to be used on blogs and/or ot her written or internet sources after permission is requested of me as I wa nt to include the explanatory page that explains the symbolisms; and, more  importantly, am willing to allow reputable galleries, museums, quilt shows, etc. to display the quilt.

If interested, please contact me at donbeldpacbell.net The quilt mea sures 60 by 60".

best, Don

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Subject: Re: knitted quilts and blogs From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Sat, 23 Feb 2013 13:09:23 -0800 X-Message-Number: 2

Thanks, Virginia, for your list of blogs followed. I checked out the Victorian Needle and lo and behold, the current post is about a knitted quilt accompanied by lovely photos!

http://needleandspindle.com/?tagvictorian

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Re: Mourning quilt re Newtown, CT tragedy From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net>

Hi Don:Would you please send us a link in order to get close the the qui lt page?....thanks, arden(Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, OR

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Subject: Re: Mourning quilt re Newtown, CT tragedy From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>

not sure what you mean by a link--if you mean the qhl gallery, just go to Q uilt History List and click on the Gallery tab. The quilt is under the q uilt tab. best, Don

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Subject: Forget me not quilt made by Don Beld From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Sun, 24 Feb 2013 07:08:09 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Don, your mourning quilt is wonderful and remarkable, thank you for sharing it with us and thank you for taking the time to make it. I am forever in awe of the work you do, all by hand. Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

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Subject: mariner's compass on e-board From: "Kathy Moore" <kmoore81austin.rr.com> Date: Tue, 26 Feb 2013 09:47:00 -0600

I've been looking for Donald Beld's post to the e-board/gallery and I noticed someone has recently posted a hand-drawn image of a mariner's compass. Would that person please contact me off list? I have a request.

Thanks,

Kathy Moore

Kmoore81austin.rr.com

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Subject: Canadian Red Cross Quilts From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Tue, 26 Feb 2013 19:55:34 +0000 X-Message-Number: 2

A lovely exhibition currently on in Maidstone, England. I am hoping  that you will be able to see this tv clip, although it may be blocked  outside Europe. I had a lump in my throat seeing a baby quilt of what  looks like 1" squares given to a young woman after the birth of her  second child after being evacuated far from home. She recently took it  from her airing cupboard and donated it to the exhibition, and (I think)  the museum.

These quilts are still being found, researched, and appreciated. Just  as I am sure quilts like Don's, and the Veterans quilts, will be in the  future.

 http://www.itv.com/news/meridian/story/2013-02-21/canadian-quilts-for-blit z-families/

Sally Ward

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Subject: Re: Canadian Red Cross Quilts From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>

Lovely, Sally. And an amazing number of quilts donated. Thank you for sharing this with us. best, Don

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Subject: Re: Canadian Red Cross Quilts From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Tue, 26 Feb 2013 15:56:34 -0800 X-Message-Number: 4

Thank you for posting the link to this story, Sally. It has enabled me to add to my files on this subject. There has been some great research about this type of "comfort" quilt made during WWII. If anyone else knows of more, please share. The two on my shelf are the 1988 copy of AQSG "Uncoverings"-- which contains Joyce B. Peaden's paper "Donated Quilts Warmed War-torn Europe" (pg 29-44) and the 2005 book "Passing on the Comfort: The War, The Quilts and the Women Who Made a Difference" by An Keuning-Tichelaar and Lynn Kaplanian-Buller.

Karen Alexander Lope Island, WA

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Subject: Re Canadian Red Cross Quilts From: Ann-Louise Beaumont <albeaumonthotmail.com> Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2013 06:11:40 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

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When Edie Zakem and I were researching women's quilt history in the twentie th century in the province of Prince Edward Island2C Sherri Davidson very  generously allowed us to read her manuscript. According the Sherri2C the Women's Institute of PEI donated 92C260 quilts to the Red Cross during WW 2. When you consider how small PEI is2C this is staggering. I tried to f ollow up on Sherri's research with the Women's Institute2C but had no luck .

http://www.gov.pe.ca/firsthand/index.php3?number3D43765&lang3DE is a li nk to our work.

I gather Sherri published her PEI book2C but unfortunately2C I don't have a copy.

Best Wishes2C Ann-Louise Beaumont Campbell River2C BC. 

--_58c46379-75b5-4cf9-97d7-1f3da76d582d_--

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Subject: ? Removing soot from fabric From: <parsnips1verizon.net> Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2013 11:58:36 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

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Good morning, QHL,

I had a minor explosion in my basement this morning and everything has a  layer of soot on it. Some is barely visible until you run your finger  across it and some is visible, but a heavy layer of soot.

I have a ton (probably more than that) of fabric that was not covered or  in containers. Of course there are quilt cottons, but also assorted  apparel fabrics. Most are machine washable and sturdy (my  antique/vintage fabrics and quilts are not down there).

Can the soot be effectively washed out of the fabric? Will it take  repeated washings or will one with the right detergent be sufficient? I  was thinking of using Synthropol and washing soda. Any information you  have will be appreciated. Also, if you know what works well on the  surfaces that can be cleaned (the Rubbermaid totes, painted surfaces,  etc.)

Thanks, Pat Roth ------_NextPart_000_0003_01CE14E1.C66EF280--

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Subject: Re: ? Removing soot from fabric From: michele mclaughlin <mickiemclaug58yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 27 Feb 2013 10:17:23 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 3

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Pat, we had a similar situation when we first bought our home. I recomme nd you contact your home owner's insurance. They paid for the clean up a nd had all the fabrics professionally cleaned. I know there is a special project that the cleaning company used on the house. Hope this helps, Good luck, Michele McLaughlin Allentown PA

--- On Wed, 2/27/13, parsnips1verizon.net <parsnips1verizon.net> wrote:

From: parsnips1verizon.net <parsnips1verizon.net> Subject: [qhl] ? Removing soot from fabric To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Date: Wednesday, February 27, 2013, 11:58 AM

Good morning, QHL,

I had a minor explosion in my basement this morning and everything has a la yer of soot on it. Some is barely visible until you run your finger acro ss it and some is visible, but a heavy layer of soot.

I have a ton (probably more than that) of fabric that was not covered or in containers. Of course there are quilt cottons, but also assorted appare l fabrics. Most are machine washable and sturdy (my antique/vintage fabr ics and quilts are not down there).

Can the soot be effectively washed out of the fabric? Will it take repea ted washings or will one with the right detergent be sufficient? I was t hinking of using Synthropol and washing soda. Any information you have w ill be appreciated. Also, if you know what works well on the surfaces th at can be cleaned (the Rubbermaid totes, painted surfaces, etc.)

Thanks, Pat Roth

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Subject: Re: Canadian Red Cross Quilts From: Susan Seater <seatermindspring.com> Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2013 03:02:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Sally, So nice to know that the great gift of Nova Scotian women (was it really 24500 quilts?!) is still appreciated. Gave me a chill to think of the stories in those quilts!

Susan Seater Raleigh NC

I had a lump in my throat seeing a baby quilt of what > looks like 1" squares given to a young woman after the birth of her > second child after being evacuated far from home. She recently took it > from her airing cupboard and donated it > http://www.itv.com/news/meridian/story/2013-02-21/canadian-quilts-for-blitz-families/ > > Sally Ward

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Subject: Re: Help a former member get re-connected please. From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2013 04:20:01 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 2

Not to be cranky, but subscription problems should be sent to me, not the l ist. If you forget who I am, or how to subscribe, or how to get to the g allery or whatever, it's on our website. And that website again? http://quilthistory.com .Kris(List Mom)

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Subject: Sherrie Davidson's quilt book PEI From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmvyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2013 09:13:19 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 3

Sherrie Davidson's quilt book about Prince Edward Island quilts is still available on Amazon.com

Quilts of Prince Edward Island: The Fabric of Rural Life [Paperback] Sherrie Davidson $35-$24.

Connie Ark Urbana Ohio where it is snowing and icing and snowing and icing........

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Subject: soot clean-up From: SEHinzmanaol.com Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2013 13:18:49 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 4

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I had a similar situation years ago and everything was cleaned professionally, thanks to the insurance policy. The oil mixed with the soot on the floor and walls was incredible, and all my fabrics and clothes had to have special treatments. I was told at the time not to use water because of the fuel involved in the soot. Good luck.

Susan Hinzman in North Carolina. --part1_148fe.77528475.3e60f989_boundary--

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Subject: Re: ? Removing soot from fabric From: <parsnips1verizon.net> Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2013 15:54:05 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

Thanks, Michele! I didn't think to do that, but will definately look into it. Pat Roth

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Subject: Subject: Re Canadian Red Cross Quilts From: Susan Seater <seatermindspring.com> Date: Thu, 28 Feb 2013 15:39:10 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Dear Ann-Louise and other friends

http://www.amazon.com/Quilts-Prince-Edward-Island-Fabric/dp/1551097680 Here is Edie Zakem's book on Amazon. Quilts of Prince Edward Island: The Fabric of Rural Life $23.10 [no connection]

I read all of your 2001 PEI report. Great to have this info.

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Subject: Re: A Modest Proposal From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net> Date: Mon, 8 Apr 2013 23:22:11 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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I don't usually add a "me too" but in this case I say DITTO! What a great article....thanks, arden(Ms) Arden Shelton Por tland, OR________________________________ From: Jan Masenthin < quiltsrmesbcglobal.net>To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.c om> Sent: Monday, April 8, 2013 12:26 PMSubject: [qhl] Re: A Modest P roposal Gaye, after reading your post, I feel like I've just been to  class, and I loved it. You are such a treasure.Jan Masenthin --547783885-1183979578-1365488531:28130--

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Subject: Re: A Modest Proposal From: kittencat3aol.com Date: Tue, 9 Apr 2013 06:31:38 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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America has *always* been a country of multiple ethnic groups, beginning w ith the varied Native groups that were here long before Europeans came. Th e reason so many people don't know this is due to the exclusionary history  education that was the norm prior to the 1960s and 1970s, and yes, I *have* read the old history books. My mother was a teacher for almost thirty yea rs and had some of the textbooks she taught from as far back as the 1950s.  Believe me, having the "ethnic literature" section consist of a couple of  "Negro spirituals" and some Child's ballads while devoting a unit to the Lo well girls does nothing to honor the work that EVERY ethnicity, EVERY gende r, EVERY sexual orientation or race or religious group did to build our nat ion.

What we need is a comprehensive curriculum that gives equal weight to the H ungarians who poured steel in Pittsburgh, the slaves who built the Capitol, the girls who died in the Triangle Shirtwaist fire, the Sioux who were sys tematically robbed of their lands, the French Canadians who worked in the N ew England textile mills, and the Chinese who were stuffed into ghettos on  the West Coast and demonized as the Yellow Peril. This country has never h ad the sort of talk it needs to about race relations, or gender relations,  and thanks to reactionary forces in certain areas that buy large numbers of textbooks (not to mention the emphasis on testing that has all but destroy ed any attempt to teach children to *think* rather than spit back a set lis t of facts), there's little hope that this will take place.

It makes me so angry that I had to wait until I was in college, or later, t o learn that my hometown was almost certainly built as a sundown town that  excluded blacks...that I grew up only a few miles from Homestead, site of o ne of the great labor clashes of the 19th century, not to mention a superb  Negro League baseball team, yet never had either mentioned in American hist ory classes...that the town I work in was named for a man who advocated (an d likely practiced) deliberate genocide against the Iroquois and Abenaki Na tions...that my own mother was given tranquilizers during her pregnancy (wh ich caused dental problems that have cost me thousands of dollars to fix) b ecause she was fired from her job and stuck in the suburbs with no car and  no friends because exposing teenagers to a pregnant woman, even a married o ne, simply wasn't done in 1960. We need to include everyone's stories in  our national discourse and the education of our children, and the sooner we do it, the better.

Lisa Evans

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Subject: looking for information From: "Kathy Moore" <kmoore81austin.rr.com> Date: Wed, 10 Apr 2013 20:03:43 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

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Ladies, I need your help. I need to contact Rod Kiracofe. Is there anyone on the list who can help me make the connection?

Thanks,

Kathy Moore

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Subject: resources on dyes From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Thu, 11 Apr 2013 11:54:25 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

HI All, recently, I thought I saw a book about yellow dyes. It appeared to be an older book. Now, of course, I can't locate the book nor can I find any such thing in book databases! does anyone out there know of a book delaing with yellow dyes. My curiosity is piqued! Marcia Kaylakie, Austin, TX

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Subject: Re: resources on dyes From: aharkins5216comcast.net Date: Thu, 11 Apr 2013 18:59:58 +0000 (UTC)

I've never seen yellow singled out. (I should say "haven't yet", because my experience isn't so vast as to allow "never") I'd be interested in such a book too. My impression is that yellow is so easily obtainable from natural dyes, that it's not a stand-alone topic. But maybe you mean a book on the chrome chemicals?

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Subject: Re: resources on dyes From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Thu, 11 Apr 2013 16:04:01 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Well, it's really hard to say. I only got a quick look at it and believe me, it was quick! I could be entirely wrong, of course, but the book struck me as an older book in appearance, pre-1960 for sure. Not a large book in length or width, but most likely 200+ pages or so. sigh......another moment lost when I should have stopped and whipped out the iPhone!

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Subject: Re: A Modest Proposal From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Thu, 11 Apr 2013 18:06:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

I studied history from those history texts of the 1950's that supposedly ex cluded the contributions of all the "left-out" sub-groups of Americans, and all I can say is that I found in them a rich, positive message about the i ntegrating power of a free society, where education and a open economy made it possible for one to achieve dreams impossible to realize in most of the civilized world.

Yes, those texts grouped many of these sub-groups in units on The New Migra tion and similar categories, but somehow I developed an instinctive admirat ion for the people whose extraordinary labors made possible a trans-contine ntal railway; for those who worked in NYC sweatshops so their children mig ht become doctors, lawyers, and Indian chiefs; and for those whose unionizi ng had made possible better conditions for people like coal miners and manu facturing employees. I learned about the Underground Railroad (the real one ), George Washington Carver, the Tuskeegee airmen, and the way the armed se rvices had helped advance the cause of racial integration. In one class in  middle school, I got to play the role of a suffragette in a play we had to  write ourselves.

Using suggestions found in our textbook, my fourth-grade teacher set all of us on the best path to critical learning a child that age could have E2 8093E28093 correspondence with pen pals from other places. For at leas t 15 years I corresponded with a girl named Takahashi from San Francisco wh o had originally wanted to know about the plantation on which I lived (!) a nd another from the Soviet-occupied sector of Vienna, Austria, whose every  letter to me had been opened by a censor and approved with a government sta mp. Receiving a letter with sections cut out (questions about a movie star) will teach even the simplest child something about the value of freedom--- and without a teacher's sermonizing. And I assure you, W. Takahashi and I l earned together not to trust stereotypes!

I came out of those public school classrooms with an immense pride in being American. I knew well the failures of our national past, but on balance, t hey paled in comparison with its successes.

The group of people whom I would only much later know as a sociological gro up of which I was a part, the plain-folk Southerners who poured into the De ep South after the Revolutionary War and War of 1812, whose lives had gener ally been hard-scrabble for a century, and who would use the ballot to prot est their own lack of representation in government in 1930's populism---the se got short shrift.

But I knew them anyway. They were "my" people. And stories abounded in my f amily about how they had made possible free public education, free text boo ks, and good roads for their children. My parents told me about children th ey had known who had to drop out of school because their parents could not  afford books for their large families. The tones of their voices made clear the tragic failure of our state in deliberately acting to enforce ignoranc e on a hard-working people.

I do not overstate when I say I genuinely appreciated the privileges I had  because of those people's exercise of the ballot. Because I lived in a stat e where a demagogic leader, Huey Long, had abused their trust in many ways, I also knew the danger posed when any group is effectively unrepresented.  I understood what caused revolutions, and I knew the excesses that always c ame with revolutions. Some of my knowledge of this group came through an ei ghth-grade Louisiana history course, but most of it---the understanding par t---came from my home and community.

But---and this is the critical point of this personal relation---I did not  see as exceptional and unforgivable the inequities of the past, did not see them as reasons for reparations or blamefulness. I recognized from my stud ies that inequities are a part of the life of every society. My classes had shown me that much. And I felt mighty grateful that I lived in a nation an d state where one had the guaranteed right to redress those inequities by t he ballot.

In other words, my study of history provided a context within which to unde rstand the imperfections of our nation and to recognize the ways in which t hey might be redressed by the under-represented. They gave me and my fellow students a vital sense of agency.

I believe I am a representative example of students who came through the cu rricula of "the fifties" and sixties. Moreover, I went to a country school  in a poor state, but a good school. I believe I was the only student in my class who had a parent who had attended or graduated from college. I suspe ct my sister was the same. Probably 1/4 of our student body qualified for f ree lunch program, though only about 1/8 chose not to pay. All lunches were subsidized by state funds.

I attended a Louisiana state university and then Alabama and Georgia state universities for advanced study. More than half my undergraduate classmate s came from homes where no parent had attended college. Many of my classmat es in graduate school came from such backgrounds.

I myself could not have afforded financially to attend Harvard; nor could  I have been admitted to Harvard as an undergraduate because I lacked the ge nitalia requisite for enrollment---and little rebel that I was then, I woul d never have thought about attending a female academy. But I believe I had access to an excellent education, courtesy to state-funded institutions. W hat I did with that education was up to me. But the state and nation had pr ovided the means by which I might become a productive citizen----and that i s what state schools are responsible for doing. Had they been doing that re cently, our demographic landscape would look different.

My background made me appreciate the racial integration movements which sur rounded me, for my own people had mounted such a movement, albeit it more c onventional. I was also able to recognize when that movement was sabotaged  by demagogues both white and black and mostly politicians whose purposes b etrayed the original intent of the movement. But my understanding of histor y gave me perspective in which to interpret and respond to this particular  movement.

We may choose to teach our history as a long, mean battle between groups wi th opposing interests. I believe that misrepresents the meaning of our shar ed past, but we may make that choice and far too generally in the past 50  years, have made that choice. The result will be the kind of "hate" the wri ter describes. We will consume. We will separate ourselves in little island s of self-interests, teach our children to be self-focused and selfish gene rally. Under the guise of some abstract altruism, we may spend our lives in unproductive selfishness and blamefulness.

We may also choose to teach our history as the story of a people who launch ed an unprecedented experiment in representative government whose fate has  always rested on the conception that man is a flawed creature who will make mistakes and pursue his self-interest but who also, when given the opportu nity, is capable of a concern for the common good, if only out of self-inte rest. But anyone who seriously studies and promulgates the study of our his tory is obliged to confront the George Washingtons and George Washington Ca rvers, people whose concern for right and for the whole superseded their co ncern for their private welfare, people who looked beyond the present momen t and worked to create a better future for a motley group that has always b een the United States.

My own study of current history and literature guidelines and texts and ind ividual implementations of both suggests they encourage the former view, an d that view produces disintegration and mean-spirited selfishness.

A useful study for students might be the post-war career of Robert Edward L ee of Virginia. Lee was not the kindly old gentleman sentimentalists often  portray him to be. He had lost a war he had not wanted to fight, but in whi ch he had invested his entire mind and being. He lived in a world literally shattered and destroyed by battle. And because he had conducted himself wi th such dignity, after that war he had the opportunity to live comfortably  by agreeing to let his name be added to the boards of a number of prosperou s national companies. Instead he chose to go to a little college unknown ou tside of Virginia---Washington College in Lexington, Virginia. The school w as poor. Its directors were so poor they had to pool funds in order to purc hase one suit fitting for the occasion for the member who would represent t heir invitation and cause to Lee. Lee was an engineer, not a teacher, but a s an engineer, he recognized that the future of the Southern states depende d on their ability to develop railroads and other technologies, their abili ty to work as active parts of a nation. Knowing also that whatever he chose to do would have symbolic importance to the people he had led in battle, h e went to Washington College. If ever any man had a reason to complain of i nequities (he received citizenship posthumously), to weep over past injusti ces, it was Lee. That he refused that craven path and set an example of the proper response to failure and wrong is a lesson that needs teaching in sc hools.

There are lots of Lees in our history. Enough, at least, to make us believe in the possibility of genuine altruism and honor and disinterestedness amo ng our people. And always they are optimists, who see in our system of gove rnment and in our history the light of promise offered by representative go vernment and a nation founded on that promise. History thus taught will uni fy, will relate all the parts to a common whole that is a noble development in the history of humanity. It will make us aware of our achievements, not just of our failures.

As for the national and state testing programs that many claim do not promo te what they label as "critical thinking skills," I also beg to differ with their critic. Having spent a little more than half my teaching career in a preparatory school, I know those tests intimately. I feel absolutely certa in that most on this list would find them too easy, given the grade levels. They test the things that a student should have mastered at given stages-- -things they absolutely must know to advance. Without that mastery, the stu dent cannot proceed to learn other things.

For instance, the writing component on the Louisiana test for 8th graders i s a paragraph which is accorded points for unity (all sentences address sin gle subject), coherence (one idea leads to next most of the time), developm ent (the writer explains/expands upon that single idea in logical manner),  basic punctuation and usage (writer uses sentences ended by period; questio ns ended by question mark; capitalizes first word in sentences; indents fir st line; generally employs the punctuation and grammar skills established i n curriculum for 8th grade). For each component, the student may receive po ints 1-5. This component tests both reasoning and usage skills. And the sco re that must be achieved is, I believe, low.

These tests measure vocabulary in the different disciplines (one must know  what an "irrational number" is at some point, e.g.), the ability to recogni ze logical errors, the ability to apply concepts to particular situations ( e.g., subtraction rules to a "life" situation, and so on.

There is no reason for teachers to complain they must slight their students ' learning because they "must teach to the test." That is pure hokum. If th ey have taught the concepts and skills in the curriculum, and their student s have succeeded in mastering them, they their students will ace the test.  Only an unskilled or poor teacher will believe he can parrot-fashion to tak e these tests.

I encourage parents, grandparents, interested citizens to request exemplary copies of these tests and also of the ACT and SAT examinations, so they ma y be better informed. Then you may make informed judgments on their validit y.

If schools are responsible for educating students, then their success at th at job should be evaluated. If students are responsible for mastering skill s and knowledge, then their achievement in those should be measured.

I feel passionately about education in general and about the study of histo ry in particular because I believe they are absolutely fundamental to our s uccess as a nation. The whole work of education traditionally understood is to "draw from" the individual her essential humanity, and that is an act o f unification, not disintegration.

I assume that most in this group feel passionately about history and educat ion. And I believe individuals have more power to affect current trends tha n they recognize. I've been amazed at the persistence so many here have sho wn in addressing the UGRR foolishness, which demeans African-Americans. And I've been proud to be part of a group that determined to establish simple  fact in a single area. That's a noble achievement. In my view, the list has shown how change can be created against almost overpowering odds. In the  process we've become aware of how overtly political our national school cur ricula and guidelines are. I hope those who have been alerted thus, will ta ke the time to look at what kind of history is being taught---and learned-- -generally in our schools.

Gaye Ingram

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