Subject: Re: quilt code lesson plans From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2013 11:36:35 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

Someone needs to design a computer game that incorporates he code myth and show how those symbols couldn't have worked, i.e. create a "world" where using the symbols doesn' work and using other means (factual accounts) would lead to a "win". That will get kids' attention. Marcia Kaylakie

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Subject: RE: Dreaming with you From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2013 13:39:57 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

Candace, what would you do in German month? Post 95 theses on doors of schools?Sing ditties from Wagner or, more hopefully, Shiller? Make strudel? Dance those round dances I learned in International Folk Dancing in college? I like the 95 theses idea. Got a hammer?

gaye Ingram

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Subject: Re: quilt code lesson plans From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2013 13:47:10 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

Maybe called "What's Wrong with this picture?"

The problem is that critical thinking is best taught "live." In the game format, the student is necessarily "guided" by sets of possibilities.

Children would LOVELOVELOVE punching holes in this illogical story. They love punching holes in anything, frankly.

It would work perfectly into a reading curriculum (use of evidence to support assertions, e.g.).

But when so much else needs doing, it would be better done outside school doors.

gi

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Subject: Re: The UGRR myth From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2013 14:26:54 -0500 X-Message-Number: 10

As for this particular false tale, I think we must first work in our own communities through our school boards and PTA organizations.

A national format, especially one that could on You Tube would help.

But I think we ought to treat it as part of a bigger problem---wasted time in classrooms for mindless indoctrination, when time teaching skills is needed.

Gaye

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Subject: Re: The UGRR myth From: Mitzioakesaol.com

Couldn't have stated it better myself Gaye. Have spent almost 10 yrs trying to explain this UGRR Myth at the Shelburne Museum visitors who come looking for samples in the Museum's collection. Mitzi from VT

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Subject: Re: quilt code lesson plans From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2013 13:57:39 -0700 X-Message-Number: 12

Here is what one group has done in preparing Lesson Plans. Be sure you copy and past the whole think if a simple click doesn't take you there.

http://mercury.educ.kent.edu/database/eureka/detail_lesson_general2.cfm?Less onsID190

Found it at the Ohio Literacy Resource Center at Kent State University. E-mail: olrcliteracy.kent.edu

Big surprise to find this today since this is where my father taught for 30 years.

Also discovered that one Maryland UGRR site calls it a "theory" but never the less takes advantage of the interest in the story and offers lesson plans for schools also!

http://pathways.thinkport.org/resources/tips.cfm#secrets

Karen A.

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Subject: Quilt Documentation is Happening in AZ From: linda laird <clproductsgmail.com> Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2013 09:42:41 -0700 X-Message-Number: 13

Here's what is going on. We've got a couple of groups in training and hope to move forward this year. http://www.azcentral.com/community/gilbert/articles/20130319group-preserve s-stories-behind-arizona-quilts.html?nclick_check3D1

Linda Laird

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Subject: UGRR myth From: jfbauer1066yahoo.com Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2013 10:04:05 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 14

---2027350018-875873231-1363885445:43284 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I'm afraid that I'm not seeing the benefit of blaming any one person for the current pervasion of the UGRR myth. The myth was, at the beginning, perpetuated largely by many quilters, and now we are faced with undoing the effects of poor scholarship all around. The lesson to learn is to place truth, accuracy, and the hard work of study before all other considerations. It is a lesson we have learned the hard way.

Judy Bauer, in cold and dreary PA ---2027350018-875873231-1363885445:43284--

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Subject: Re: UGRR myth From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Thu, 21 Mar 2013 23:20:13 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 15

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Dear All, Judy states one truth very well. What ever has happened and will happen to critical thinking? This skill has seemed to disappear as a learning goal in our society and schools. A dose of critical thinking could have killed the myth in the beginning, but that was years ago. I quietly hand out rebuttal articles, web sites, and smile sweetly when I am told that it is just such a sweet story, it must be true and reply "but it isn't". I think it is insulting to the intelligence and experience of the slave who wished to be free and had the bravery to try to escape. Janet H in Fort Worth whose maternal grandmother's family owned two slaves before the civil war. Nothing to be proud of.

In a message dated 3/21/2013 9:36:18 P.M. Central Daylight Time, jfbauer1066yahoo.com writes:

I'm afraid that I'm not seeing the benefit of blaming any one person for the current pervasion of the UGRR myth. The myth was, at the beginning, perpetuated largely by many quilters, and now we are faced with undoing the effects of poor scholarship all around. The lesson to learn is to place truth, accuracy, and the hard work of study before all other considerations. It is a lesson we have learned the hard way.

Judy Bauer, in cold and dreary PA

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Subject: For your blog,website Facebook page etc. From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Fri, 22 Mar 2013 06:56:13 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

I don't feel like beating a dead horse more today with regard to the UGRR, however, a Facebook friend happens to be a fan of Old Sturbridge Village and posted a photo that caught my eye on her page the other day. https://www.facebook.com/sturbridge If this link doesn't work, try this one:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid10152107022124979&seta.59967144978. 20497.8124924978&type1&theater

Here is a quote:

Early New Englanders made maple sugar instead of maple syrup because sugar kept longer - maple syrup would mold without refrigeration. Also, abolitionists disdained white sugar, which was made with slave labor. Here visitors grate maple sugar - visible as the brown cone in the front right foreground. OSV Maple Days continue: www.osv.org. Do you know what weather conditions are most conducive to maple sugaring?

It might be a great alternative school project as opposed to studying the false quilt code to actually do hands on making of maple sugar? This time of year in New England is maple sugaring season when the sap begins to run in the trees, so Sturbridge Village has this activity available.

The people who control the schools lately would probably be opposed to this due to limiting sugar in the diets of our children as they seem so obsessed in doing. Lately I feel like you just can't win with educational systems due to the way they seem to be fixated on certain things. A tiny bit of maple sugar on ONE DAY will not cause all our kids to become obese; it is the constant sugar, fats and other things in their diets and lack of activity that does this. I really liked the remark made about making a video game where they "win" if they can escape without a quilt code. Maybe their mentality is only directed towards that kind of thing nowadays? It makes me sad to think of how things have changed.

I wish I had more hours in my week as I would be tempted to run for the school board, for sure.

Linda Heminway Plaistow NH

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Subject: Re: A Modest Proposal From: kittencat3aol.com Date: Fri, 22 Mar 2013 07:07:09 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ----------MB_8CFF504883ACC04_19A8_F05C8_Webmail-d118.sysops.aol.com Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Content-Type: text/plain; charset"us-ascii"

This has nothing to do with Black History Month, or Women's History Month. It has to do with our country focusing more on vocational and practical ed ucation than the liberal arts, with more and more politicians claiming that we need to spend our money teaching our kids "practical skills" that will slot them into jobs instead of critical skills and a broad range of knowled ge that will teach them to think and evaluate and question what is presente d to them. If anything, we need MORE education that doesn't give the conve ntional (and almost entirely white, male, and Christian) version of America n history; I still remember an audience of mainly elderly and middle aged w hite women in tears at the sight of a KKK quilt at Seminar a few years ago, at least in part because the modern generation is so poorly educated in hi story that they don't know that the Klan was every bit as opposed to Cathol ic, Jewish, and feminist participation in society as it was to blacks. Tha t is not going to happen if we get rid of the one time in the school year w hen the emphasis isn't completely on the conventional and, unfortunately, a lmost entirely lily-white (and thus not accurate) version of American histo ry.

Also, I think we need to remember that HIPV was written by a white woman, J acqueline Tobin. That this poorly researched and badly sourced book, which never would have made it past the peer review at an academic publisher, is now being used during Black History Month is NOT the fault of black educat ors or historians; Giles Wright was black, and I don't recall him ever sayi ng that the answer was getting rid of Black History Month.

*sits back and waits for the brickbats*

Lisa Evans

-----Original Message----- From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Thu, Mar 21, 2013 7:15 am Subject: [qhl] A Modest Proposal

How to rid the world of the UGRR lie (for it is not a myth as that term is

properly construed)?

I have an idea that is educationally and culturally sound: rid public schoo ls of Black History Month. In fact, let's dump all the "diversity months." Our children need to know how to be American. We integrated public facilities,

including schools, 50 years ago, and it's time we acted like it. Our childr en see blacks and whites interacting routinely; they have mothers who go off t o work. It's time we got back to one of the purposes of public education---pa ssing along the real history of our nation in history classes without sociologica l agendas. Deal with slavery as it arises naturally. Ditto for women. And may be just leave the gay-straight agenda to parents, not schools, at least until the schools can do a better job teaching math, science, reading, writing, and

thinking than they are currently doing. Let's focus on our common purposes, our common humanity, brotherhood.

And while we're at it, maybe we could rethink that phrase "the black commun ity." Would we dare say "the white community" without irony? "National Review" an d "The Huffington Post," both owned by white investors, are designed for enti rely different viewpoints. Are we to believe that black people have only one viewpoint? The phrase "black community" is a construct of politicians, who

acquire more power than they deserve by having everyone assume they speak f or everyone whose skin is black. That is racist, and we shouldn't encourage it .

The world in which Nathaniel Hawthorne's stories are set is foreign to all

21st-century readers. They must enter it through skills that are taught thr ough reading instruction. And if they have those skills, they will learn about h uman beings---how corrosive hate is, how love redeems a life, how courage is pos sible and how we all try to run from our sins and errors. These are human lessons . Alice Walker's "Everyday Use" is about the value of family and the alienati on that occurs when one loses vital contact with family and traditions. This s tory is about problems that touch all human beings. That's what makes literature

great, what makes it last.

I understand personally what it means to encounter nothing with which one i s familiar in grade-school reading texts. I grew up a country child in the De ep South, believing "real life" took place in small New Englandish towns with pies cooling in open kitchen windows, brilliantly colored leaves required burnin g in the fall, and where Scotties named Mac and cats named Muff cavorted inside neat picket fences with their tidy owners, Bob and Nancy. Nobody in those storie s had feist dogs or one-acre front yards or acreage for a horse. There were no Ma ry Beths or William Wallaces. No burning summers. No pine trees. And I felt th at to be anybody much, I probably needed to get myself to where Mac and Muff live d. So I know how a black child feels if her reader gives her only a lily-white suburbia. Everyone needs to see the world he himself knows occasionally in

school books.

My own children's readers had a variety of characters from a variety of backgrounds once they got past the animal stories of kindergarten. And they also selected books from the school library, which had a wide range of books. In

fact, they had every background except the one in which they lived. But the ir teachers were skilled, the effort was not so much literature as learning to read well.

And right now, our children are not learning to read well. They are not lea rning to think critically. They are not being taught to recognize the most common

logical fallacies. And if statistics are accurate, they are not learning ma th and science particularly well.

So I suggest we rid our curriculum of diversity-training months, thereby relieving teachers of finding some activity---any activity---geared to thos e and letting them focus on basic educational goals.

A rally toward that end would have shock-and-awe power.

Wild in Louisiana, Gaye Ingram

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Subject: HIPV From: ikwlt <ikwltyahoo.com> Date: Fri, 22 Mar 2013 09:50:21 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

i'm very much behind reading digests, and this might have been covered, but my thot for one way to debate the hipv book would be to change the library catagory to "fiction"rather rather than history. by starting out the discussion coming from fiction angle, it would be easier to dissuade the argument that the code quilt was used. not sure if this is a viable thing to try to accomplish or not, anyone know? patti williams

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Subject: Re: A Modest Proposal From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Fri, 22 Mar 2013 16:48:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

If I recall correctly, Raymond Dobard was the co-author of that book. ----- Original Message ----- From: <kittencat3aol.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 6:07 AM Subject: [qhl] Re: A Modest Proposal

This has nothing to do with Black History Month, or Women's History Month. It has to do with our country focusing more on vocational and practical education than the liberal arts, with more and more politicians claiming that we need to spend our money teaching our kids "practical skills" that will slot them into jobs instead of critical skills and a broad range of knowledge that will teach them to think and evaluate and question what is presented to them. If anything, we need MORE education that doesn't give the conventional (and almost entirely white, male, and Christian) version of American history; I still remember an audience of mainly elderly and middle aged white women in tears at the sight of a KKK quilt at Seminar a few years ago, at least in part because the modern generation is so poorly educated in history that they don't know that the Klan was every bit as opposed to Catholic, Jewish, and feminist participation in society as it was to blacks. That is not going to happen if we get rid of the one time in the school year when the emphasis isn't completely on the conventional and, unfortunately, almost entirely lily-white (and thus not accurate) version of American history.

Also, I think we need to remember that HIPV was written by a white woman, Jacqueline Tobin. That this poorly researched and badly sourced book, which never would have made it past the peer review at an academic publisher, is now being used during Black History Month is NOT the fault of black educators or historians; Giles Wright was black, and I don't recall him ever saying that the answer was getting rid of Black History Month.

*sits back and waits for the brickbats*

Lisa Evans

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Subject: underground railroad to be national park From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts@yahoo.com>

.This article appeared in the Washington Post today. It's an opportunity fo r someone to contact the US Parks Service to inform them of the lack of evi dence about the quilt code, and to monitor their work on the underground ra ilroad project to ensure that they don't include erroneous information abou t the supposed role of quilts.Obama to designate national monuments i n Md., Del.; sites include underground railroad* 1Comments * * * * * * MoreByAssociated Pres s,Friday, March22,12:19AMWASHINGTON 94 Pa rt of Harriet Tubman underground railroad in Maryland that helped move slaves to freedom will become a national monument under plans from th e Obama administration.The White House plans to designate new national m onuments in Maryland, Delaware and three other states, bringing the histori c sites into the National Park Service system.The Arlington, Va.-based C onservation Fund donated a property on Maryland Eastern Shore to the National Park Service to help tell Tubman story of the underg round railroad. Tubman escaped slavery at age 27 but returned to Dorchester and Caroline counties to help slaves escape to the North.In Delaware, O bama will designate the First State National Monument. It will include the Woodlawn Trustees property near Wilmington, the Old New Castle Courthouse, the New Castle Green and the Dover Green.C: www.laurafisherquilts.com fisherheritage@yahoo.comfind us on facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts --828875537-634805502-1364014005:59701--

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Subject: Re: underground railroad to be national park From: <judy.grow@comcast.net> Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2013 01:41:16 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Do you remember the POSTER that our national park service printed and gave away/mailed free prinjted with the blocks of the "quilt code?"

Judy grow

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Subject: Re: underground railroad to be national park From: textique@aol.com Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2013 01:57:08 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

Laura,

I'm on the National Park Service email list for UGRR conferences because of the type of research I did when I lived in Ohio. They informed me in an email about 3 or 4 years ago (which was cc'd to seve ral of their administrators) that this theory is not fact-based and would not be promoted by any of their staff. Still won' t hurt to keep a line of communication with them. I'll dig out the email.

Jan Thomas

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Subject: Re: underground railroad to be national park From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421@comcast.net> Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2013 06:37:26 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

This appears to be a new project by a new Fiber Arts Center in the area mentioned in Laura's post. Denton is in Eastern Shore Maryland, near the Delaware border. I'm not able to find information about what blocks they are using or what their message is.

http://www.fiberartscenter.com/quilt-trail/?utm_sourceFACES+Newsletter&utm_campaign86fe8bcad0-Newsletter_43_21_2013&utm_mediumemail

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: Barb's discovery on the Eastern Shore and the UGRR From: Sue Reich <suereich@charter.net> Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2013 21:53:19 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Below is the committee for the new Underground Railroad Quilt Trail being de igned for FACES (Fiber Arts Center of the Eastern Shore). Not sure how many of these folks are quilters. Their first block chosen to tell the story of the UGRR is Chips and Whetstones!!!!!!

Marina Dowdall is a realtor, advisory board of Fiber Arts Center of the East ern Shore Danielle Darling, freelancer in graphic arts. Christina Lippincott, coordinator of tourism Caroline county, MD Amy Jacocks, Advisory Board of Fiber Art Center of Eastern Shore Donna Hayes, Advisory Board of Fiber Art Center of Eastern Shore Mick Mc Crea, ?

This whole UGRR myth is getting so out of hand it is becoming totally laugha ble. Sue Reich

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Subject: FACES From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ss@yahoo.com>

I saw that announcement, too (about the quilt blocks along the Harriet Tubm an parkway). Reading the explanation about the chips and whetstone quilt block did not lead me to the conclusion that they were entirely suckered b y the UGRR fiction. Rather, they explained the heightened value, as prop erty, of slaves that had been trained in a skill such as carpentry. It r emains to be seen whether further extensions of the quilt theme dredge up t he nonsense about quilt codes; I won't have a chance to pursue it for a while yet. Anybody on the Eastern Shore more informed about this??? Susan

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Subject: Re: A Modest Proposal From: kittencat3@aol.com

He was. But the primary author, and the one who met Ozella Williams, was J acqueline Tobin, who is white.

----- Original Message ----- From: <kittencat3@aol.com> To: "Quilt History List" <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Friday, March 22, 2013 6:07 AM Subject: [qhl] Re: A Modest Proposal

This has nothing to do with Black History Month, or Women's History Month.

It has to do with our country focusing more on vocational and practical education than the liberal arts, with more and more politicians claiming that we need to spend our money teaching our kids "practical skills" that

will slot them into jobs instead of critical skills and a broad range of knowledge that will teach them to think and evaluate and question what is

presented to them. If anything, we need MORE education that doesn't give

the conventional (and almost entirely white, male, and Christian) version o f American history; I still remember an audience of mainly elderly and middle

aged white women in tears at the sight of a KKK quilt at Seminar a few year s ago, at least in part because the modern generation is so poorly educated i n history that they don't know that the Klan was every bit as opposed to Catholic, Jewish, and feminist participation in society as it was to blacks . That is not going to happen if we get rid of the one time in the school yea r when the emphasis isn't completely on the conventional and, unfortunately,

almost entirely lily-white (and thus not accurate) version of American history.

Also, I think we need to remember that HIPV was written by a white woman,

Jacqueline Tobin. That this poorly researched and badly sourced book, whic h never would have made it past the peer review at an academic publisher, is

now being used during Black History Month is NOT the fault of black educators or historians; Giles Wright was black, and I don't recall him eve r saying that the answer was getting rid of Black History Month.

*sits back and waits for the brickbats*

Lisa Evans

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Subject: Re: Barb's discovery on the Eastern Shore and the UGRR From: Ca Cullen <jccullencrew@aol.com> Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2013 11:58:50 -0400 (EDT)

This whole UGRR myth is getting so out of hand it is becoming totally laugh able. Sue Reich

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so what to do?

Perhaps letter writing or e-mails would help to give them a heads up that p eople (quilters in the know)are aware and watching the direction they're go ing. Shall we send them the sheet with all the contraditions about the UGR R for them to peruse and perhaps take the time to explore so they see the r eal story?

Does anyone know how to contact the group working on this? If so, could yo u please post it so a letter/e-mail campaign can be started? It may open s ome eyes to the truth or at least make them aware there is another side to the UGRR story.

Carol Grace

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Subject: Re: Barb's discovery on the Eastern Shore and the UGRR From: Mitzioakes@aol.com Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2013 14:34:38 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 3

- Sue - With this renewed ' UGRR/Quilt Code' myth making its appearance again, it was funny when I found the quotations below whilst I was clearing out some of my 60 years of accumulation of arts and crafts 'stuff' in anticipation of my need to sell my home (after Bill's loss from Alzheimers). I remembered I was always going to design a wall hanging made up of these quotes along with some of the quilt blocks that are said to have used in the fleeing of slaves..Course, I never get to 'a round TUIT'.

Repetition does not make a lie (myth) into the truth (FDR)

No Evidence means no real knowledge (Woman's Work - The First 20,000 years)

Myths which are believed in tend to become true (George Orwell)

The greatest enemy of the truth is very often not the lie, but the myth - persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic (JFKennedy)

Happy Palm Sunday from cold and windy Vermont - still no robins or buds on the trees or the usual 'V' of geese heading north. But, Spring always comes sooner or later - mostly later Mitzi

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Subject: Re: underground railroad to be national park From: peg.bingham@yahoo.com Date: Sat, 23 Mar 2013 07:59:34 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

This first page in this project does not mention codes in the block or quilts used as signals along the UGRR. It describes the block and then goes on to correlate the name to an activity, in this case knife sharpening. The paragraph on the UGRR makes no mention of quilt codes. The purpose here does not seem to be a perpetuation of the myth! ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Barb's discovery on the Eastern Shore and the UGRR From: authorsgw@msn.com

Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

The geese are are their way north ... millions have stopped over in Nebraska to rest and eat the corn leftover from last year. I spoke in western nebraska last weekend and about sunset the sky was dark with birds headed north. Truly breathtaking. At one small lake the water was barely visible ... a small circular border around a mass of white snow geese. In another field two boys stood quietly in the midst of a vast flock of white geese. Unforgettable. And I still haven't seen the sandhills cranes for myself but I know they are there too. Stephanie Whitson

--_f78e8fc6-dde9-4803-ae9f-b0e4f32ecbd0_--

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Subject: Re: underground railroad to be national park From: quiltnsharron@charter.net Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2013 20:26:22 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 6

I thought the same thing. I also went back and read Sweet Sarah's quilt book again thinking she never really said quilt "blocks" helped find the way. I've been pondering all of this since the subject came up (AGAIN). I'm wondering if it's now becoming about perception, intentional or not. I don't think we'll see the myth disappear until we completely eliminate the UGRR and a quilt in the same breath, sentence, picture, whatever.

To Mitzi: It's getting cold here in the burbs of Houston as the sun goes down. Should get down in the 40's. Warm thoughts to you in the snow.

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

On Sat, Mar 23, 2013 at 6:59 AM, Peg Bingham wrote:

> This first page in this project does not mention codes in the block or > quilts used as signals along the UGRR.

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Subject: Goldie Richmond quilt book From: clproducts@gmail.com Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2013 15:51:32 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

Just a heads up that Desert Trader: The Life and Quilts of Goldie Tracy Richmond by Carolyn O'Bagy Davis is available at Amazon. Goldie ran a trading post on the Tohono O'odham Indian Reservation for forty years beginning in 1927. She created amazing, award winning applique quilts depicting scenes from desert life that are now revered for their artistic vision. This book introduces Goldie and shares her wonderful quilts. An American treasure. I've seen the quilts three times in the last twenty years and am still astounded at the authenticity and workmanship. Rarely do quilts make me cry, these do. We should all be grateful to Carolyn for her twenty years of research and having the courage to self publish this book.

Linda Laird

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Subject: Re: Goldie Richmond quilt book From: Arden Shelton <ardenls@yahoo.com> Date: Sun, 24 Mar 2013 20:14:31 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

--Apple-Mail-130EAC64-3B68-4D71-9FDB-DCF3353C2856 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetus-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

What a coincidence!....I was just in Tucson last week and bought the book fr om the Cactus Quilt Shop. The owner, Nancy Langdon, had permission to reprod uce one of the quilts. I purchased the pattern last year from her and this y ear, read the book from cover to cover all week while I was there. It was ju st fascinating reading about her very hard life and then all about her quilt ing activities. The 2 of her quilts owned by the Arizona Historical Societ y and the Arizona State Museum were not on display and I could not organize a ppointments to see them....maybe next year.

I think the book was so fascinating because both of my parents' families are from Arizona, here before statehood and were almost as dirt poor as Goldie' s so I could slightly identify with the story of her life. Anyway, the book was great and the story of how the author got the story was just as interes ting.

http://cactusquiltshop.com/cactus-cat-patterns.html

....arden (one of the few actually born in AZ!)

(Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, OR

From: linda laird <clproducts@gmail.com> To: Quilt History List <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Sunday, March 24, 2013 3:51 PM Subject: [qhl] Goldie Richmond quilt book

Just a heads up that Desert Trader: The Life and Quilts of Goldie Tracy Rich mond by Carolyn O'Bagy Davis is available at Amazon. Goldie ran a trading po st on the Tohono O'odham Indian Reservation for forty years beginning in 192 7. She created amazing, award winning applique quilts depicting scenes from d esert life that are now revered for their artistic vision. This book introdu ces Goldie and shares her wonderful quilts. An American treasure. I've seen t he quilts three times in the last twenty years and am still astounded at the authenticity and workmanship. Rarely do quilts make me cry, these do. We sh ould all be grateful to Carolyn for her twenty years of research and having t he courage to self publish this book.

Linda Laird

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Subject: Writing From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltn@comcast.net> Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2013 07:58:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

This remark was made:

So what to do?

Perhaps letter writing or e-mails would help to give them a heads up that people (quilters in the know)are aware and watching the direction they're going. Shall we send them the sheet with all the contraditions about the UGRR for them to peruse and perhaps take the time to explore so they see the real story?

Take note that under "reviews" of this book, several people have written in and corrected misconceptions:

http://www.amazon.com/Hidden-Plain-View-Underground-Railroad/dp/0385497679/r efsr_1_1?ieUTF8&qid1364212470&sr8-1&keywordshidden+in+plain+view+a+secr et+story+of+quilts+and+the+underground+railroad

But, the same needs to be done for the Eleanor Burns book:

http://www.amazon.com/Underground-Railroad-Sampler-Eleanor-Burns/dp/18917761 34/refsr_1_14?sbooks&ieUTF8&qid1364212597&sr1-14&keywordseleanor+burns

I did take note of many other books on the UGRR topic when I first searched for the Hidden in Plain View book, but do not have time to investigate them today. I do think that enough people writing in to dispute the myth when there are books offered for sale could be a good start.

Linda Heminway Plaistow NH

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Subject: 100 Amazing Facts about the Negro: Find out which popular beliefs are myths (slave quilts anyone) by Louis Henry Gates From: clproducts@gmail.com Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2013 07:06:32 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

Article in Washington Post today: http://www.theroot.com/views/who-really-ran-underground-railroad.

This puts our quilt concern in context with other myths and also gives us support from a national icon of Negro history. Could we draw him into our development of positive curriculum for Black History month?

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Subject: UGRR From: "Sharron K. Evans" <quiltnsharron@charter.net> Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2013 12:01:32 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Early on in this discussion someone commented that they had a flyer they printed out to hand to guild members or whenever it was needed. I swear I copied it but now I can't find it. Would that someone please send it to me privately or publicly.

Warm regards, Sharron Evans Spring, TX ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Millennium Quilt From: Sue Reich <suereich@charter.net> Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2013 13:14:17 -0400 X-Message-Number: 4

I am on the search for a Millennium quilt. Can you email me privately if yo u know where I can locate one? Thanks. Sue Reich

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Re: 100 Amazing Facts about the Negro: Find out which popular beliefs a... From: JLHfw@aol.com Date: Mon, 25 Mar 2013 21:46:45 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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Happiness Is Quilting is a lovely little shop in McKinney, Texas that also carries a nice selection of imported Dutch fabrics. Just a satisfied customer. Janet Henderson in Fort Worth

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Subject: Women and sewing machine history From: "Kathy Moore" <kmoore81@austin.rr.com> Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2013 08:33:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

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Here's a quote Stephanie Higgins found that I thought you'd all be interested in.

"More than twenty years after the invention of the sewing machine it was declared too dangerous for women to operate; and a Boston physician testified that in a survey among sixty-nine of his medical colleagues, forty-four stated woman's physical structure did not permit her to sew by machine without permanently damaging her health."

From Women in the Civil War by Mary Elizabeth Massey, University of Nebraska Press, 1994 (originally published in 1966 by Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. as Bonnet Brigades)

I'm resisting any other form of comment, but it's hard!

Enjoy,

Kathy Moore

Round Rock, TX

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Subject: Statement from Appraiser From: Edwaquilt@aol.com Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2013 09:58:08 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 2

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This statement was made by a Certified Appraiser regarding finishing a Grandmother's Flower Garden top. Is this true? I have never heard this. This was from a quilter who sat in and observed an appraisal. this is part of what she said about the appraiser's comments.

Interestingly, tho the quilt top was hand-pieced, the appraiser suggested machine quilting to secure the seams and keep it held together. Her word was that is was "appropriate" to machine quilt the top since "machine quilting" has been performed for decades even during the 1920's. AND the method of quilting did not compromise the value of it. It made no difference in fact.

Holice --part1_d29f.42935637.3e830370_boundary--

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Subject: RE: Statement from Appraiser From: authorsgw@msn.com Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2013 10:26:32 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

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IMHO that was questionable advice based on the fact that of the kazillions of Grandmother's Flower Garden quilts I've seen over 40+ years of my quilt history-loving life2C I don't think I've ever seen one that was machine quilted. Yes2C I have seen plenty of machine quilted quilts from the era but never a flower garden. The ones I've seen machine quilted were what I would term more "utility" quilt quality. I do wonder however ... if perhaps the stitching that held the pieces together was rotting? That would complicate the "what do I do with this?" question mightily. Stephanie Whitson (NOT a certified appraiser but one who has taken the AQS class more than once2C been a dealer2C and who continues to learn everything she reasonably can about quilt history)

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Subject: machine quilting a top From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ss@yahoo.com> Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2013 08:38:43 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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Umm - I am NOT an appraiser, but that appraiser is apparently not a quil ter or a person who actually does work on items like this.

It is true that many quilts were machine quilted - as long ago as the machi nes became common tools in the home. HOWEVER - just because you can (or could) doesn't mean you should. There are SO many factors to consider ca refully - the type of quilt top, the condition of the fabric itself, the qu ality of the handstitching, the potential value of the quilt, and the poten tial for an appropriate - that's artistically and historically appropriate - design to be carried out by machine.

Without taking time for a full essay, a g'mother's flower garden quilt does not come to mind when I think of quilt tops for machine quilting. It is VERY geometric, so the traditional outline quilting would be very challeng ing and time consuming. Anything else would look very odd to me - I don' t ever recall seeing such a quilt with any other style of quilting.

I would have told the owner of the quilt to get a second opinion before com mitting to such an irreversible action. Susan

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Subject: RE: Women and sewing machine history From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton@comcast.net> Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2013 10:51:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

We had a presentation on early sewing machines at the recent regional quilt study meeting in Tucson, AZ. Lots of those kinds of objections were made but one I had not heard was that using the treadle machine got women 'excited'.....not a good thing, apparently? :) jean

> "More than twenty years after the invention of the sewing machine it was > declared too dangerous for women to operate; and a Boston physician > testified that in a survey among sixty-nine of his medical colleagues, forty- > four stated woman's physical structure did not permit her to sew by machine > without permanently damaging her health." >

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Subject: Machine quilting vintage tops From: Sue Reich <suereich@charter.net> Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2013 12:31:56 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Hexagon quilts can be beautifully quilted by machine. If you have the oppor tunity to see Mary Kerr's exhibit Quilt as Desired, it is proof positive the se quilts can be beautifully finished by talented long arm quilters. The ex hibit was recently shared in Lancaster and can be seen in Oconomowoc, Wiscon sin in August. I have a number of continuos line, machine quilted quilts from the late 19th century and early 20th century. Pantograms were available for machine quil ting in the late nineteenth century. Sue Reich

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Response to my inquiry about the Maryland Underground Quilt Trail From: Sue Reich <suereich@charter.net> Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2013 12:40:17 -0400 X-Message-Number: 7

Hi, The Underground Railroad Quilt Trail is not about the "quilt codes" which we

know to be a myth. Instead we will tell factually based historical information and use quilt images to help illustrate them. Like the "barn quilts" of many counties across the U.S., this is a public art project and is not about perpetuating the "quilt code" theory. May I ask what made you think that it was?

Marina Dowdall Executive Director Caroline County Council of Arts, Inc.

Maybe the name of their project is misleading. Do you think? My next quest ion for them is a request to site their reference for use of the Chips and Whetstones. Sue Reich

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Subject: RE: Machine quilting vintage tops From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton@comcast.net> Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2013 13:29:02 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

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I do a workshop on this topic and I, too, have seen old tops finished with the machine very successfully- including GFGs.

MOST old tops are not historical or significant in the manner of an antique that should not be altered but...some are so it's good to have someone with expertise take a look first and then think about what your goal for the top is. It's not true that finishing an old top necessarily devalues it...in fact, it certainly extends its life by being stabilized and now can be used instead of stuck in a drawer. ( speaking mostly of 20th century pieces but machines were certainly used to quilt tops as soon as machines were widely available)

A finished piece would most likely appraise higher than the top alone providing it is done well.

Some people believe that only using 'period' fabrics or styles is appropriate but that is only an opinion. Others enjoy combining the current fabrics and styles to create a unique and creative piece linking two generations.

Years ago well respected quilt collector/teacher I knew had a very nice c. 1900 top overall quilted...At the time I was aghast. I would not have made that choice but she explained it this way...her use of the piece was to teach - a wide variety of fabrics could be studied, the piece was to be hauled around and examined and if left as a top it would not last....plus the time to hand quilt it or the money it would cost to hire that done was not feasible for this piece - for her...That was a turning point for me and a good example of how the intent for the piece and the desires of the current owner need to be considered. A general statement that things must be done a certain way is limiting and may result in the piece living in a box rather than providing someone the joy of working with it to completion or of even actually using it.

I advise people to be as educated as possible and take their time making the choice but then, it IS their choice and they need feel no guilt!

Jean

Jean Carlton

AQS Certified Quilt Appraiser

http://quiltsetcetera.blogspot.com/

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Subject: Re: Machine quilting vintage tops From: Stephen Schreurs <schreurs_ss@yahoo.com>

Sue, I stand corrected, or at least better informed. I will make a point to look for Mary's exhibit, and for other examples.

That said, I have seen some lovely tops quilted in a manner that really did n't do them justice - often by eager beavers who seemed only to want 3 laye rs stitched together in the easiest, cheapest, or quickest way they could t hink of so that they could call it a quilt. And I'm not a luddite - I am still learning to free motion quilt, and have often done quilts which will see hard use (crib quilts, patriot quilts) using my dual-feed foot.

By the way, speaking of sewing machines being used by women....I learned to sew on an old treadle machine. The quotation of the early doctors just goes to show that lots of experts don't know what they are talking about. As to Jean Carlton's report about female excitability, that also sou nds more like a man's anxiety than a lady's. Nothing further to report o n that! Susan

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Subject: RE: Response to my inquiry about the Maryland Underground Quilt Trail From: authorsgwmsn.com Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2013 11:59:32 -0500

It looks to me like they are merely using the name of a traditional quilt block to inspire a thematic approach to UGRR history. Just as someone might put a Double Wedding Ring quilt on a greeting card designed for weddings. Reminds me of the beautiful watercolor greeting cards that show an ocean waves block on the beach of a maritime scene ... Steph Whitson

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Subject: Re: Machine quilting vintage tops From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2013 15:04:29 -0500 X-Message-Number: 11

I ahve seen several machine quilted Grandmother's Flower Garden quilts from the 1930s and 1940s. I have a pamphlet from the Mountain Mist Company that is titled"Machine Quilting Your Quilt", so it was encouraged by at least one company during that time period. Marcia Kaylakie, ISA AQS Certified Appraiser Austin, TX www.texasquiltappraiser.com

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Subject: RE: Response to my inquiry about the Maryland Underground Quilt Trail From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2013 12:47:18 -0400 X-Message-Number: 12

Sue -- I think it's HUGELY misleading. I don't know how anyone would assume otherwise unless they knew nothing about HIPV. It seems to me they are using the association to help their project, but don't want to be associated with it. It's kind of odd. Candace Perry

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Subject: Re: Machine quilting vintage tops From: authorsgwmsn.com

Couldn't resist raising my hand as one who also learned to sew on a treadle machine. That's what our Home Economics class had. An entire row of treadle machines along the wall of tall old-fashioned windows. Clark Junior High School E. St. Louis IL 1962-1965. Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Author Carrie Hall and TQHF Inductee From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2013 17:05:29 -0700 X-Message-Number: 14

I just stumbled across this website today about a Stroke Survivor Quilt in which Carrie Hall's granddaughter contributed a block in honor of her grandmother. The granddaughter is also a stroke survivor.

http://www.strokeeducation.info/projects/quilt/QUILT1.HTM

Karen Alexander

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Subject: RE: Women and sewing machine history From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Tue, 26 Mar 2013 21:07:33 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 15

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My head's exploding!

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

On Tue, Mar 26, 2013 at 8:33 AM, Kathy Moore wrote:

"in a survey among sixty-nine of his medical colleagues, forty-four stated woman's physical structure did not permit her to sew by machine without permanently damaging her health."

 

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Subject: RE: Women and sewing machine history From: "Janet O'Dell" <janet6139gmail.com> Date: Wed, 27 Mar 2013 12:16:35 +1100 X-Message-Number: 16

OK - bad posture and bad eyesight for a start................also according to my FIL (dec), steam irons are a death-trap too - water and electricity should never mix........ I wonder how I have survived this long!

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia

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Subject: RE: Women and sewing machine history From: aharkins5216comcast.net

Maybe all that "excitement" explains why so much quilting was going on. "Not tonight honey. I have to finish that quilt." LOL