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Subject: Make your own "secret quilt message" From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Wed, 27 Mar 2013 08:02:28 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

I went out on line after reading today's digest and found a web site put together by Maryland public television with info from the Maryland Historical society. It made me cringe when I read it. It does say in a few areas that there is not proof, but boy does it ever imply that the quilt code is/was real. I think it's terrible and to think it is being utilized by teachers and promoted it so bothersome.

http://pathways.thinkport.org/flash_home.cfm

If you look at this web page, it certainly implies that the quilt code was factual. It invites people to "imagine" and "make your own secret quilt message". It does say there is no evidence of the quilt code, it is actually furthering the myth through implication and use of quilt blocks and even a photo of a quilt hanging on a clothesline. People who create such things have a responsibility to tell the truth and not make even more non-fact implications that it was real.

I couldn't believe this when I saw it.

http://pathways.thinkport.org/secrets/secret_quilt.cfm

http://pathways.thinkport.org/secrets/quilts1.cfm

It says quilts "may have" helped and gives photos of drunkards path and monkey wrench blocks. It even references use of some kind of codes in Africa. It is, again, furthering the myth. Sad to see such wrong information being portrayed, the words "may have" and "imagine" are an "out" as far as I am concerned. So, they continue to romanticize a myth. Everyone who reads this and sees suggested projects to use your imagination and create a quilt block will leave believing the myth. No doubt in my mind.

Though in the last paragraph, the term "may have" is again used. How very sad.

http://pathways.thinkport.org/secrets/quilts2.cfm

Don't mean to burst someone's bubble here, but if a historical web site is putting these codes out there, what chance do historians who only want the truth and real history have?

I am actually tired of this subject but when I find something like this, I have to wonder if many of you have seen it? Do you think this is a responsible way of providing this information to the public or not?

Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

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Subject: Machine Quilting a Top From: "Greta VanDenBerg" <maquilterepix.net> Date: Wed, 27 Mar 2013 10:12:39 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

I am on digest and thus missed the lively exchange yesterday. Thank you all for such wonderful entertainment first thing this morning!

I have a number of 19th century treadle machines to facilitate my study of how they could be used to make some of those early quilts, especially the machine quilted ones. While I have never noticed 'that' sort of tingle I will certainly pay more attention the next time I am sewing or quilting with one. The craftsmanship and design of some of them is so beautiful that just looking at them can make my heart skip a beat. :-0

I wholeheartedly second Sue's suggestion to find Mary Kerr's exhibit 'Quilt as Desired.' Inspirational is the best word I can use to describe it. IMHO a finished quilt is better than a quilt top unless that top is in some way historically significant as is, or would fall apart in the process of quilting.

Machine quilting has been around since sewing machines were first available. To lessen the value of such work lessens the work of the women (and men) who made quilts by machine. While some may not consider them treasures, I value greatly the only family quilt I have that was made by my great grandmother c.1900 that is machine quilted. With that quilt as inspiration for me to learn to quilt it was only logical that I would become a machine quilter. I quilt any size quilt on home machines because I get to hold and have a working relationship with the quilt. That is a tactile delight that no longarm machine can replace!

Greta VanDenBerg http://splintersenthreads.blogspot.com/

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Subject: Re: Make your own "secret quilt message" From: aharkins5216comcast.net Date: Wed, 27 Mar 2013 15:01:33 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 3

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Let's have some fun with this and join in the "make your own" experience. I'll make a Crazy Ann block to be used as code for anyone who takes the HIPV story as fact-based. There are so many more possibilities; especially if we aren't constrained by reality.

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Subject: quilt code article From: textiqueaol.com

My brain has shut down for the day so if this is a duplicate of "The Root' article posted a few days ago, please forgive me. Trying to catch up. Good article thoug h.

http://www.theroot.com/views/massachusetts-keeps-slavery-myth-alive?page3D 0,2

Jan Thomas

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Subject: Re: quilt code article From: authorsgwmsn.com Date: Wed, 27 Mar 2013 22:46:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I especially appreciated the point that many varied cultures were represented among African slaves. To assume there was an "African culture" that held symbols in common is so simplistic it boggles the mind. And one could see it as actually denigrating the rich cultural traditions--unique to each area of the continent. The real ones.

Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: searching for an article From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2013 08:30:53 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

---853603208-427058277-1364484653:98005 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetutf-8 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hello all,0AI received this request:0A0A"I want to locate the sour ce for a group quilt article about East and West German women who made a qu ilt during the reunification of Germany. The West German women, knowi ng the East German women weren99t as affluent, dyed cotton sheets, a nd sent the dyes to the E. Germans with sample blocks, making it possible t o create a reunification of Germany quilt together."0A0AIs anyone f amiliar with article? If so, would you please contact me off-list?0A Thank you.0ABest regards,0AJudy Schwender ---853603208-427058277-1364484653:98005--

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Subject: Re: searching for an article From: aharkins5216comcast.net Date: Thu, 28 Mar 2013 16:10:43 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 3

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I'd be interested in that as well. It sounds like "current" quilt history ( meaning "something I lived through"), but history nonetheless, and a fair t opic for the group.

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Subject: quilt sighting in movie (old one) From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net>

Hi All, last night, I watched a movie called "Two-Faced Woman" with Greta Garbo and Melvyn Douglas. Silly plot, and not one of Garbo's finest! BUT..... toward he end of the movie, douglas comes back into the ski lodge and wraps himself up in a beautiful crazy quilt and then goes downstairs to see Garbo! This had to be 1940s or so. Sure looked lovely but the film was in B/W so i could not see colors! Marcia Kaylakie in Austin, TX - ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Martha Howard Quilt From: Mary Persyn <mary.persynvalpo.edu>

For any of you who are not familiar with this quilt - I stumbled across this story

http://www.thecantoncitizen.com/2013/03/28/true-tales-howard-quilt/

-- Mary G. Persyn Associate Professor of Law Emerita Valparaiso University Law School Valparaiso, IN 46383

mary.persynvalpo.edu

--089e0149c37ce8450504d911a6a7--

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Subject: RE: Martha Howard Quilt From: "Kathy Moore" <kmoore81austin.rr.com> Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2013 10:56:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Wonderful story. Thanks for sharing Mary.

Kathy Moore

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Subject: RE: Martha Howard Quilt From: "Miller, Maretta K" <millermkuww.edu> Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2013 16:19:13 +0000 X-Message-Number: 4

Uhhh...the story says Martha (b. 1760) made the quilt between 1761 and 1787 . By using the 1761 date (Martha would have been one year old) it seems li ke they are trying to capitalize on a too-early date. But perhaps I'm just being picky. I'd rather see "finished prior to 1787".

Maretta Miller Southern Wisconsin, where it's FINALLY reaching an average temperature toda y -- even though my backyard is still completely covered in snow. : )

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Subject: Re: Martha Howard Quilt From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2013 12:21:47 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

That is, indeed, a venerable quilt! But it is definitely not the oldest American-made quilt. The Massachusetts Quilt Documentation Project book (Massachusetts Quilts: Our Common Wealth) includes two considerably earlier whole-cloth quilts--one from about 1738, and the other from 1769. And there are quilted petticoats from the 1730s and 1740s, too. By the 1780s, whole-cloth quilts were common among the elite, such as Martha Crafts Howard. In my research on New England's early whole-cloth quilts, I found that they were very often from families connected to the clergy--like Martha Crafts Howard--who, of course, were THE elite in colonial America. Susan Schoelwer explores this connection in her book Connecticut Needlework. The early *documented* wool whole-cloth quilts that I researched could all be traced to a marriage--so I would postulate that Martha Crafts Howard made her quilt in 1786 or 1787.

Thanks for posting this article, Mary! I will add it to my database of New England whole-cloth quilts!

All best, Lynne Bassett

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Subject: Re: Martha Howard Quilt From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2013 14:06:21 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

Thank you, Lynne, for that reminder about the history and dates of Wholecloth quilts in America already published.

As an aside, I have just started reading your latest book Homefront & Battlefield: Quilts & Context in the Civil War. I brought it to the attention of my history-loving husband this morning. After flipping thru it, he said he would add to his May list! (Yes, he is one of those that has a "planned" reading list every month and he adheres to it faithfully. His goal is always 10 books a month!) This will be only the 2nd of my many quilt history books that he will have read. The other was Textual Rhythms: Quilting the Jazz Tradition by Carolyn Mazloomi. I showed him that one because he plays sax and clarinet and has loved jazz since age 12, and his avocation is jazz music history. He really liked the quilts in Carolyn's book as well!

Got to plant those seeds for an appreciation of quilts whenever we can!

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Homefront & Battlefield: Quilts & Context in the Civil War From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2013 14:09:53 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

Lynne Bassett, I meant to ask in that last post about where I can find the venues for the traveling exhibit. I am assuming this exhibit is still traveling. Thank you,

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Maryland's Underground Quilt Trail From: bevnedjrverizon.net Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2013 15:54:49 -0400 X-Message-Number: 8

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

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Sue and others have raised some questions about the Fiber Arts Center of the Eastern Shores project called Underground Quilt Trail. Id like to share some thoughts as a resident of Marylands Eastern Shore. In the Mid-Shore area, several groups are actively working to build interest in learning about Harriet Tubman and her role in leading slaves to freedom by way of the Underground Railroad. The excitement is now enhanced by this weeks announcement that President Obama has set aside 480 acres in her home county for a national monument (front page article in the Baltimore Sun). Plans are underway for a number of activities to bring tourists to the area to learn about Harriet Tubman and celebrate her life. The Underground Quilt Trail is one of those activities, intended to direct people to significant landmarks around the area. They describe it as Telling the story of the Underground Railroad through the Imagery of Quilts: 15 quilt blocks to be installed on structures along the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway and All American Road throughout the year 2013 in honor of the centennial celebration of Harriet Tubman.9D The first, Chips and Whetstones, is used to tell the history of slaves becoming skilled in the use of tools. The story ends with a reference to a skilled slave, Frederick Douglass, who was a caulker on ships in the Baltimore Harbor. It appears that, as a Fiber Arts Center, they felt quilt blocks would be an attractive way to lead people around the landmarks on the trail and also a way to work in some history, just as Barbara Brackman has done in her publications and blogs. There was no mention of quilts as codes for runaway slaves. The Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway has a website and facebook page. Quilt historians are eager to correct the misinformation about the use of quilts as code for the UGRR, but this FACES activity doesnt fall into that category. Hope this helps with what is happening here.

Best, Beverly Birkmire ------_NextPart_000_03C9_01CE2C95.BE5565E0--

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Subject: Quilt Code/Giles Wright From: golden.bcverizon.net Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2013 15:27:25 -0400 X-Message-Number: 9

I have never joined in the discussions of this topic, but recently a book group I belong to announced that the book for the month was going to be Hidden in Plain View. I was quite curious as to how the hostess for the month came to choose this book.Turns out it was recommended by a friend and professor at the nearby college where she works (and where this book is being taught to students). So I was motivated to read the HIPV and do some research on the opinions debunking it.I'd like to pass along this article by an New Jersey Historian named Giles Wright which I found most authoritative. Probably this is old news to many of you.

Betsy Golden

http://historiccamdencounty.com/ccnews11_doc_01a.shtml

If the link doesn't work search Giles Wright Critique Hidden in Plain View.

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Subject: RE: Maryland's Underground Quilt Trail From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2013 18:19:53 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 10

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With all due respect, I don't think this helps anything at all. The problem is perception. "Underground" and "Quilt Trail" immediately gives people the impression that slaves were shown the way by quilts!!! There's not another way to "direct people to significant landmarks?"? How about train murals? Thank you for sharing this information. There just has to be a different way to get the results you're looking for.

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

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Subject: Re: Homefront & Battlefield: Quilts & Context in the Civil War From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com>

Hi Karen,

Thank you very much for your interest in Homefront & Battlefield--and for passing it along to your husband! I am very flattered!

The exhibition appears next (with many different quilts than those shown at the American Textile History Museum, so of course you can see it more than once!) at the New-York Historical Society, from April 4 through August 31, *2014*, then to the Shelburne Museum in Vermont from September 20, 2014 to January 1, 2015, and then to the Nebraska State Historical Society in Lincoln from Feb. 1 to June 30, 2015.

All best, Lynne Bassett

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Subject: Re: UGRR, yet again From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>

Hi all,Just so you know...The Hotel Metropolitan here in Paducah is a n old negros-only hotel that has been turned into a museum. It is act ually quite an interesting place. You can find out more about it at h ttp://www.thehotelmetropolitan.org/. There is a "contact us" link. I urge all of you who are wanting to correct the myth of the Undergroun d Railroad Quilts to email the contact given there.I have tried to get this straightened out, but have had no luck. Perhaps a quanti ty of comments will be more meaningful.Judy SchwenderPaducah , KY________________________________ From: "aharkins5216comcast.net" <aharkins5216comcast.net>To: Quilt His tory List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Saturday, March 30, 2013 2: 11 PMSubject: [qhl] Re: UGRR, yet againIf you want to protest, how about in Paducah? This from Fons and Porter: Paducah embraces QuiltWeekA2 with quilt-related community and AQS-sanctioned events t hroughout the city, window displays and church dinners. Celebrate the depth of the fiber art experience with the Rotary Antique Quilt Show, Fantastic Fibers at Yeiser Art Center, African American Underground Railroad Quilts a t the Hotel Metropolitan, Eleanor Burns' Quilt in a Day and so much more! Anna H arkins ----- Original Message -----From: kittencat3a ol.com To: "Quilt History List" <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Sa turday, March 30, 2013 7:06:41 AM Subject: [qhl] Re: UGRR, yet again I'd be willing to bet that the national monument is being paid for from a different account than the White House tours, and was appropriated long b efore the sequestration. Protesting a monument to a major historical figure (and frankly someone who should have been honored this way years ago) does n't strike me as particularly productive. The quilt blocks, on the ot her hand....*argh* SO TIRED OF HIPV AND UGRR!!!!!! Lisa Evans

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Subject: UGRR, yet again From: Sue Reich <suereichcharter.net> Date: Mon, 1 Apr 2013 12:10:54 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Judy wrote about The Hotel Metropolitan here in Paducah is an old negros-onl y hotel that has been turned into a museum. For those of you in Paducah for quilt week, this is a golden opportunity t o be heard. On April 27th at 10:3m a Berea College professor and UGRR exp ert, Dr. Alicestyne Turley will be presenting. The web site does not menti on what her quilt topic is about.

Sue Reich

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Subject: Re: UGRR, yet again From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Mon, 01 Apr 2013 09:49:27 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

Google Alicestyne Turley-Adams and you'll get some of her background. She has impressive credentials. I am really curious now what position she has taken on the Quilt Code.

http://www.berea.edu/berea-spotlight/2012/12/17/dr-alicestyne-turley-lookin g -back-moving-forward/

This news article below mentions that the title of her lecture is : The Underground Railroad Quilt Code: Myth or Reality?B2

Read more here:

http://www.middlesborodailynews.com/view/full_story/12510691/article-Renown e d-Appalachian-Photographer-subject-of-exhibit-at-Nat’l-Park

The National Park Service has also had her speak:

http://www.nationalparkstraveler.com/2011/02/underground-railroad-quilt-cod e -truth-or-myth7677

Another government website. Notice the last line.

http://www.nps.gov/cuga/parknews/the-underground-railroad-quilt-code-truth- o r-myth.htm

<<Since the book's publication, the "quilt code" has become legend and is surrounded by controversy, with many scholars disputing its existence and the lack of evidence to support Williams' story.

Was the quilt code an actual "map" to freedom as some claim, or simply a charming story created to sell more quilts?

Join us at Cumberland Gap National Historical Park for a program by Dr. Alicestyne Turley of the Pan African Studies Department at the University o f Louisville that will examine the quilt code and the controversies surrounding it, and make up your mind for yourself.>>

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Re: UGRR, yet again From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Mon, 1 Apr 2013 13:55:35 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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I sent an email to Ms. Dobson at the Hotel Metropolitan and gave her the link to The Root. That's it. I'm through.

Warm regards, Sharron

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

On Mon, Apr 1, 2013 at 10:19 AM, Judy Schwender wrote:

> Hi all, Just so you know... The Hotel Metropolitan here in Paducah is an old negros-only hotel that has been turned into a museum.

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Subject: Re: UGRR, yet again From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Mon, 1 Apr 2013 16:36:29 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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I sent an email to Ms. Dobson and here's her reply:

Dear Ms. Evans,

Thank you for the link. We try to offer interesting and entertaining programs during the Quilt Show at the Hotel Metropolitan to foster Good Will. This year's quilts exhibit is entitled "Inner Child", by Dr. Nancy Dawson, Pan-African Studies and quilter. These quilts are designed by local children from the Boy's and Girls Club. On Friday, April 26th Dr. Alicestyne Turley, Director of the Carter G. Woodson Center, Assistant Professor of African and African American Studies, will examine the quilt codes and the controversies surrounding it, and you can make up your mind for yourself. Please don't be sad. It's a good program and will share all the views on this subject. Please join us, for info visit our website at www.thehotelmetropolitan.org.

Thank you, for taking the time to care. Take Care,

Betty Dobson 270-443-7918 ----------------------------------- Warm regards, Sharron

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

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Subject: Book alert- Bets Ramsey's Old-and-New-Quilt-Patterns-in-the-Southern-Tradition From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Mon, 01 Apr 2013 19:24:42 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

Can't help but want to pass on the titles of good quilt history books when I stumbled across them and already have them in my collection.

Here is one of TQHF Honoree Bets Ramsey's books.

http://tinyurl.com/bqo7sad

Two books by TQHF Honoree Jean Ray Laury books in another Lot, plus a few other books. http://tinyurl.com/cej3zlx

There is also a copy of "Old Nova Scotian Quilts" on eBay today.

Karen Alexander

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Subject: UGRR, yet again From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Sat, 30 Mar 2013 07:26:25 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

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Sharon said:

With all due respect, I don't think this helps anything at all. The problem is perception. "Underground" and "Quilt Trail" immediately gives people the impression that slaves were shown the way by quilts!!! There's not another way to "direct people to significant landmarks?"? How about train murals? Thank you for sharing this information. There just has to be a different way to get the results you're looking for.

Sharon, I couldn't agree more. When I read that I just had this sinking feeling that this will further solidify the myth.

I also had this sinking feeling about spending more of our government's money on a new monument at a time when we supposedly cannot even afford to have students touring the White House of all placed. Really? How nice to have a new monument and maybe some tourism, but is this the right time? To top it off to be making false implications.

Does anyone have an address and name of a person in charge of this project to write to? I'd not pass comment on the spending as I have given up even trying as it's so ridiculous, but I would like to write about this myth and furthering it and what a bad approach and practice this would be. It just plants the seed of growth.

Linda Heminway

Plaistow NH

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Subject: Re: UGRR, yet again From: kittencat3aol.com Date: Sat, 30 Mar 2013 08:06:41 -0400 (EDT)

I'd be willing to bet that the national monument is being paid for from a d ifferent account than the White House tours, and was appropriated long befo re the sequestration. Protesting a monument to a major historical figure ( and frankly someone who should have been honored this way years ago) doesn' t strike me as particularly productive.

The quilt blocks, on the other hand....*argh* SO TIRED OF HIPV AND UGRR!!! !!!

Lisa Evans

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Subject: RE: Maryland's Underground Quilt Trail From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Fri, 29 Mar 2013 21:15:42 -0500

Aren't the barn quilts a national movement? Steph Whitson

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Subject: Re: UGRR, yet again From: aharkins5216comcast.net Date: Sat, 30 Mar 2013 19:11:54 +0000 (UTC)

If you want to protest, how about in Paducah? This from Fons and Porter:

Paducah embraces QuiltWeekA2 with quilt-related community and AQS-sa nctioned events throughout the city, window displays and church dinners. Ce lebrate the depth of the fiber art experience with the Rotary Antique Quilt Show, Fantastic Fibers at Yeiser Art Center, African American Underground Railroad Quilts at the Hotel Metropolitan, Eleanor Burns' Quilt in a Day an d so much more!

Anna H arkins

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Subject: Re: UGRR, yet again From: quiltnsharroncharter.net

ARE YOU KIDDING ME!!! UGRR at Paducah! Well that really helps dispell the myth! That's it. I'm throwing in the towel.

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

On Sat, Mar 30, 2013 at 2:11 PM, aharkins5216comcast.net wrote:

> If you want to protest, how about in Paducah? This from Fons and Porter:

Paducah embraces QuiltWeekA2 with quilt-related community and AQS-sanctioned events throughout the city, window displays and church dinners. Celebrate the depth of the fiber art experience with the Rotary Antique Quilt Show, Fantastic Fibers at Yeiser Art Center, African American Underground Railroad Quilts at the Hotel Metropolitan, Eleanor Burns' Quilt in a Day and so much more!

Anna H arkins

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Subject: Re: UGRR, yet again From: quiltnsharroncharter.net

ARE YOU KIDDING ME!!! UGRR at Paducah! Well that really helps dispell the myth! That's it. I'm throwing in the towel.

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

On Sat, Mar 30, 2013 at 2:11 PM, aharkins5216comcast.net wrote:

> If you want to protest, how about in Paducah? This from Fons and Porter:

Paducah embraces QuiltWeekA2 with quilt-related community and AQS-sanctioned events throughout the city, window displays and church dinners. Celebrate the depth of the fiber art experience with the Rotary Antique Quilt Show, Fantastic Fibers at Yeiser Art Center, African American Underground Railroad Quilts at the Hotel Metropolitan, Eleanor Burns' Quilt in a Day and so much more!

Anna H arkins

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Subject: RE: Maryland's Underground Quilt Trail From: quiltnsharroncharter.net Date: Sat, 30 Mar 2013 16:31:38 -0400 (EDT)

I thought so but what do I know anymore. The barn quilts could have been painted by the Easter Bunny while he goes from house to house to leave little children money under their pillows in exchange for cookies and milk.

Warm regards, Sharron, riled up in Spring

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

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Subject: Re: UGRR, yet again From: JLHfwaol.com Date: Sat, 30 Mar 2013 17:16:16 -0400 (EDT)

In a message dated 3/30/2013 3:27:22 P.M. Central Daylight Time, quiltnsharroncharter.net writes:

ARE YOU KIDDING ME!!! UGRR at Paducah! Well that really helps dispell

the myth! That's it. I'm throwing in the towel.

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 281-350-3498 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

On Sat, Mar 30, 2013 at 2:11 PM, aharkins5216comcast.net wrote:

> If you want to protest, how about in Paducah? This from Fons and Porter:

Paducah embraces QuiltWeekA2 with quilt-related community and AQS-sanctioned events throughout the city, window displays and church dinners. Celebrate the depth of the fiber art experience with the Rotary

Antique Quilt Show, Fantastic Fibers at Yeiser Art Center, African American Underground Railroad Quilts at the Hotel Metropolitan, Eleanor Burns' Quilt in a Day and so much more!

Anna H arkins

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Subject: Re: UGRR, yet again From: JLHfwaol.com

I'm with you Sharon. This is totally unbelievable. What a shame that these people don't know any better. Janet H in Fort Worth

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Subject: Re: What did the African American community have to say Before "Hidden in Plainview" was published From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Mon, 01 Apr 2013 20:37:41 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

Here is another interesting link that I posted on my facebook page this morning reflecting the opinion of some African Americans about the Quilt Code. This is an African American news website.

http://www.theroot.com/views/massachusetts-keeps-slavery-myth-alive&fb_reff b_share_toolbar_horizontal

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Good news about the San Jose Quilt & Textile Museum's crisis! From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Mon, 01 Apr 2013 20:44:19 -0700 X-Message-Number: 8

HOOREY!! I just received the 3rd update about the campaign to save the San Jose Quilt & Textile Museum.

As a result of their urgent request, in less than a month they have gained 100 new members and have not only met their goal ($80,000) but have now exceeded it! Let's here it for TEXTILE lovers! You can see the original story on the left side of this link to their website under Latest News.

http://sjquiltmuseum.org/

Karen Alexander ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: another resource about the code From: ikwlt <ikwltyahoo.com>

since most of my friends know my feelings on the code quilt, they will ofte n send me stuff. this came to me the other day, thot it worth sharing. http://www.pickledish.com/2013/04/05/not-such-a-pretty-story/p atti williams

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Subject: myth and history as boon companions From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Sun, 07 Apr 2013 05:26:07 -0500

I had to smile when reading this article on the 500th anniversary of the founding of Florida. It's another "myth that will not die." Interesting to see how they seem to live with history and myth juxtaposed.

*http://tinyurl.com/c2mjbg5

*Andi in Paducah* *

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Subject: Re: A Modest Proposal From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Sun, 7 Apr 2013 19:00:17 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Re: "[This is about a ] generation is so poorly educated in history that they don't know that the Klan was every bit as opposed to Catholic, Jewish, and feminist participation in society as it was to blacks. That is not going to happen if we get rid of the one time in the school year when the emphasis isn't completely on the conventional and, unfortunately, almost entirely lily-white (and thus not accurate) version of American history. "

No one is likely to apologize for the KKK, but this is 2013 and the issues facing us have more to do with a diversity so great it affords no pattern of shared history or culture, so that everyone stakes out a claim for her own turf (be it gender, race, ethnicity, or other) and nobody is looking after the commons ground. There is little community as a nation, regardless of how often we might use that word. We are so belligerent toward those whose political views differ from ours that we must demonize them, saint ourselves, and deny the presence of any common ground. We are good; "they" are bad.

Anyone who has studied history seriously knows the ultimate damage such balkanization does to a people and/or a nation.

And those with the narrowest, most provincial views have commandeered state-provided (and nearly all university-level) educational curricula at the undergraduate level. It's fine to study the history of black people (or Irish or Chinese or Female) in the U.S. if the student already knows the whole of U.S. history well. The same is true of regional history. But to study it INSTEAD of a good, solid U.S. history two-semester course is an intellectual crime, in my view.

The people who have been excluded from American history courses these days are the people who turned New England into an independent-minded section that nevertheless became a home of Yankee economic ingenuity; those solid farmers along the Hudson River immortalized by Washington Irving; the plain people that flooded trans-montane America beginning in the early 1800s. I've never seen the laws re slavery in Anglo-America contrasted with that in French- or Spanish-origin America, and yet they differed greatly, accounting for considerably more free people of color in Louisiana than in other states by 1860. I'm willing to bet few students are taught anything about the way it affected the original Texans' concerns about becoming part of the U.S.

And outside of some specialized course in music history or the entertainment industry, I have seen nothing much about the Jewish contribution to the nation. Maybe a paragraph or two in the New-Immigration 15 minutes into which are also crammed the experiences of all Eastern Europeans.

I've spent considerable time studying curricula in literature, reading, and history, and I can assure you the emphasis is not on our shared history or our nation's exceptional achievements or contributions to world history.

Social studies curricula seem to proceed from the assumption that it is their job to right the wrongs of past generations. That is not the job of social studies courses. That is a political agenda. And one cannot think about politics intelligently until she is sufficiently well-educated in the history of the nation and national culture.

Were we, for instance, sufficiently aware of European history, we might be aware of the dangers of balkanization, of secular statism, and a lot of other problems which confront us today.

Anyone who reads "Othello" or "Lear" or "Hamlet"; "Moby Dick" or "The Scarlet Letter" or "Huck Finn" will learn about what happens to us when we reduce man to matter alone or when we are so vain as to think we alone have all the answers or that "science" can solve all our problems"---well, the core human problems that beset us all.

And the person who studies these will internalize their lesson because for the course of the play or story or novel, they will have lived inside the Reverend Dimmesdale and Roger Chillingsworth, Huck and Jim, Hamlet, and the rest. Having experienced vicariously the major temptations to which all human beings are subject, such a person will be equipped to understand and view critically slavery and lots more.

Only such courses as deal with our shared HUMAN condition are real parts of the humanities. The politicization of these courses gives those who would support only the jobs-oriented a good argument for their cause.

Feminism, Racism, and all the other -isms are political movements. As such, they certainly should be taught in our national curricula. But they should not control or guide the curriculum or assume center stage therein.

The people who wrote "Oklahoma!" or the slew of other American musicals that might well be our "national" music heritage were for the most part members of urban minorities who had been lured to the U.S. by the rich promises the nation offered them to develop their talents. They saw the nation's general achievements as positive. They worked hard to become part of the positive traditions, and triumphed as a result. And in their music we saw how they brought their own experience to bear on a larger tradition in a positive way. Their music bespeaks the value of freedom and brotherhood. They were Americans, English-speakers, not only Jews from homes where Yiddish was spoken. And to see the way they teamed with people from different backgrounds and experiences is a lesson for us all.

No one who lives or grows up in the United States in 2013 is likely to forget that groups within our whole have suffered or lacked advantages that should belong to all Americans. We don't need days to remember that. Nearly every group has at one time or another known that.

What we need is unity and a good education. We need the skills to remain a free people---the ability to detect hokum, to think logically, to think humanely, to distinguish between politics and humanities. We need to recognize the dangerous hypocrisy of fawning over Muslims and damning Baptists. We need the common ground that a knowledge of, say, Lady Macbeth, Hamlet, David Copperfield, Huck Finn and Jim, and Gatsby afford. Such shared experience permits us to communicate with one another as equals. It permits us to communicate with those who first stood on the shores of Attica or what would become the Roman Empire as well as with those whose journeys to a new shore Wm. Bradford chronicled.

I do not believe the American people in general have mandated a divisive and sentimentalized, fragmented, and watered-down curriculum such as now dominates our public education systems and the "with-it", politically correct private systems.

You cannot give any individual or people pride. Pride comes from achievement---individual achievement and personal knowledge of self-worth. Politics teaches neither.

So I stand by my position that we should do away with all the "months" that take away from the already limited time schools have for teaching core subjects, and I include in "core" music, literature, and art.

No brickbats here. Gaye Ingram