Subject: I agree!
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net>


Don said:

"I believe Linda agreed with your comments--at Home of the Brave Quilt
Project, we accept ALL quilts and are not judging the workmanship. Our
goal is to honor the fallen heroes from our recent conflicts in Iraq and
Afghanistan. There are no quilt police at HOTBQP in positions of
responsibility."



I just wanted to make a point of saying that I did not condone what was
done, it was that person's choice to alter the quilt as it was given, not my
own. I would have accepted it as donated. I think of this one woman as
doing what she felt was right in her own heart to show respect for the
families that were being given the quilts, she had no ill intent.

One person's right vs. another. who knows. : ) But, one should not judge
an entire project on the actions of one individual. Just like we should not
judge a political party (as close to politics as I would ever get here for
sure) based on the actions of one person who is in that party. : )



Linda Heminway

Plaistow, NH

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: quilt police
From: silber.julieellengmail.com



Gloria,

Hear! Hear!

I don't know you, but I love you.

Julie

Julie Silber
www.thequiltcomplex.com

-------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Singer machine instructions
From: "Nancy Roberts" <aquilterwindstream.net>
Date: Thu, 8 Aug 2013 09:00:20 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Sherrie, a resource you might find useful is the International Sewing
Machine Collectors' Society website. There is all sorts of info on all sorts
of vintage machines, including manuals. You can find it at www.ISMACS.net

Nancy Roberts
www.quiltnans.blogspot.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Singer machine instructions
From: Jan Masenthin <quiltsrmeicloud.com>
Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2013 11:47:54 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

I've been too busy to check this list for awhile, but I just saw this
post after I found a booklet in my "old stuff" that appears to be a "how
to use your buttonhole attachment on your Singer" manual. I think it
was copyrighted 1948. If you want it, email me your snail mail address
and I'll put it in the mail to you.

Jan Masenthin




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Bindings
From: maggmaloneaol.com

Remember when it was considered unacceptable to machine piece a quilt I th
ought we were way beyond this argument.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Bindings
From: Jan Masenthin <quiltsrmeicloud.com>
Date: Mon, 12 Aug 2013 09:48:49 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

I don't think it's an argument -- just a discussion. Isn't what this
list is all about?


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Feeling the need to wash your quilts?
From: suereichcharter.net


I was doing some research for my WWI Quilts book and found this article
about cleaning blankets
and quilts. In case you are so inclined, here are some useful tips from
1914. It's a wonder any quilts from that time period even exit.

Nashua Reporter
Nashua, Iowa
March 5, 1914
BLANKETS AND QUILTS
Best Way of Caring for the
Bed Accessories
Little Glycerin Added to the Rinse
Water is Recommended94Quilts
Liable to fade May Be Cleaned
With Gasoline.
The following is the best way to
wash blankets: Slice half a cake of
any good laundry soap in two quarts
of water. Set on the stove and stir
until dissolved. When dissolved, add
to cold water in a tub. To this soapy
water add four tablespoons of pow-
dered borax. Soak the blankets in
this over night or for several hours.
Wash in this water. Rinse twice in
cold water, wring and hang one the
line. This recipe will wash four
blankets. Be sure and use only cold
water, and they will come forth as soft,
and beautiful as when new. A tea-
spoonful of glycerin added to the
rinse water will improve themA6
Quilts that are liable to fade if
washed may be cleaned with gasoline.
Allow it to remain over night. Drain,
and place in a second tub of gasoline.
Strain the gasoline in the first tub,
and use it with a fresh supply for
cleaning the second piece. When
washing colored quilts avoid al-
kali. It will run the colors and ruin
the material. If quilts are badly
soiled, put kerosene in the first tub.
It will cut the dirt.
Bedding washed early in the spring
may be dried out of doors, but the
pieces should afterward be thrown
over a line hung in a room to dry
thoroughly. Ticking should be soaked
in water containing borax. Iron the
pieces dry. If thin, coat lightly with
paraffin on the wrong side. This will
prevent feathers from working
through.

Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut-----

Subject: RE: Feeling the need to wash your quilts?
From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net>
Date: Mon, 12 Aug 2013 22:04:07 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

AND the quilt washers! Gasoline and kerosene?!? Yikes!!
Regards,
Meg
. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________
Margaret E. Geiss-Mooney
Textile/Costume Conservator &
Collections Management Consultant
Professional Associate - AIC
707-763-8694
mgmooneymoonware.net

...this article about cleaning blankets and quilts. In case you are so
inclined, here are some useful tips from 1914. It's a wonder any quilts
from that time period even exit.

Nashua Reporter
Nashua, Iowa
March 5, 1914
BLANKETS AND QUILTS
Best Way of Caring for the
Bed Accessories
Little Glycerin Added to the Rinse
Water is Recommended94Quilts
Liable to fade May Be Cleaned
With Gasoline.
The following is the best way to
wash blankets: Slice half a cake of
any good laundry soap in two quarts
of water. Set on the stove and stir
until dissolved. When dissolved, add
to cold water in a tub. To this soapy
water add four tablespoons of pow-
dered borax. Soak the blankets in
this over night or for several hours.
Wash in this water. Rinse twice in
cold water, wring and hang one the
line. This recipe will wash four
blankets. Be sure and use only cold
water, and they will come forth as soft, and beautiful as when new. A
tea- spoonful of glycerin added to the rinse water will improve
themA6
Quilts that are liable to fade if
washed may be cleaned with gasoline.
Allow it to remain over night. Drain,
and place in a second tub of gasoline.
Strain the gasoline in the first tub,
and use it with a fresh supply for
cleaning the second piece. When
washing colored quilts avoid al-
kali. It will run the colors and ruin
the material. If quilts are badly
soiled, put kerosene in the first tub.
It will cut the dirt.
Bedding washed early in the spring
may be dried out of doors, but the
pieces should afterward be thrown
over a line hung in a room to dry
thoroughly. Ticking should be soaked
in water containing borax. Iron the
pieces dry. If thin, coat lightly with
paraffin on the wrong side. This will
prevent feathers from working
through.





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Feeling the need to wash your quilts?
From: "Gloria Hanrahan" <gloriaak.net>
Date: Tue, 13 Aug 2013 00:09:37 -0800
X-Message-Number: 2

--_329dfd1c04140ec444dd1f428cd65a63
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetUTF-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

C2Meg said, " AND the quilt washers! Gasoline and kerosene?!?
Yikes!!"Pretty common for the time to get rid of bed bugs and lic
e.C2 My momtalked of how all of the kids had their heads shaved a
nd doused inkerosene.C2

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Can anyone suggest what this quilt might be?
From: suereichcharter.net
Date: Wed, 14 Aug 2013 17:38:32 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 1

------_Part_18239767_499166544.1376516312309
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetUTF-8; formatflowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Disposition: inline


The Bridgeport Telegram
Bridgeport, Connecticut
February 7, 1918 Page 6

"These quilts were all made by
my mother, who lived in Kentucky
in her girlhood," she began. "This
quilt, the chariot-wheel pattern
she pieced when she was but nine
years old."
I looked at the hundreds of tiny
pieces which comprised the wheels
of the chariot, noticed the fineness
of the numberless stitches, and
wafted a sigh of sympathy to the
little girl of long ago who had
been tied to so arduous a task
when she should have been romp-
ing out of doors.

Sue Reich
Washington Depot, Connecticut

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: History of Exhibitions & Judging
From: OzarkQuiltmakeraol.com
Date: Thu, 15 Aug 2013 17:03:43 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 1

--part1_a289f.77e85e5e.3f3e9c2f_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi:

I'm updating my lecture on quilt show judging and putting it into a power
point presentation. I'd love to find some early photos of 19th century and
early 20th century exhibitions that I can use in the history portion of my
lecture.

Does anyone have information on 19th century quilt exhibitions and
contests? When did judging quilt shows begin? Any information or web site links
would be appreciated. My email address is listed above.

Thanks,
Kathy Kansier
Teacher, Judge & AQS Certified Appraiser
Ozark, Missouri
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Chintz whole cloth quilt fabric
From: kaytripletaol.com
Date: Sat, 17 Aug 2013 13:48:45 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 1

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
----------MB_8D06989279BC339_D0C_E0370_webmail-d222.sysops.aol.com
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"us-ascii"


Hello All,

Sandra Starley mentioned that she thought you had discussed a quilt from a
2009 Pook and Pook auction on this board. Sorry if I missed it.

http://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/6704633

Xenia Cord had a quilt with one of the ovals of a couple, and I have another quilt with a different oval of a couple from the same quilt. Xenia felt that it was Charlotte and Leopold pictured in the ovals. There are other ovals, but we can't really make them out from the photo from the auction. Does
anyone know where this quilt ended up, or recognize the fabric such that they can give us more information? I have posted good photos of the two panels on our quilts on the eboard under the fabric tab asking for help with chintz. Thank you!

Kay Triplett






----------MB_8D06989279BC339_D0C_E0370_webmail-d222.sysops.aol.com--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: History of Exhibitions & Judging
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>
Date: Sun, 18 Aug 2013 17:49:22 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

--1389141485-774552105-1376873362:75457
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

look at world's fairs exhibition sites, century of progress contest, etc. f
or possible photos of big showsLaura Fisher attel: 212/ 838-
2596;cell:917/ 797-1260web: www.laurafisherquilts.comemail:
fisherheritageyahoo.comfacebook: Laura Fisher Quilts>_________
_______________________> From: "OzarkQuiltmakeraol.com" <OzarkQuiltmake
raol.com>>To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> >Sent:
Thursday, August 15, 2013 5:03 PM>Subject: [qhl] History of Exhibitions
& Judging> >>Hi:>>I'm updating my lecture on quilt show jud
ging and putting it into a power >point presentation. I'd love to fin
d some early photos of 19th century and >early 20th century exhibitio
ns that I can use in the history portion of my >lecture. >>Does
anyone have information on 19th century quilt exhibitions and >conte
sts? When did judging quilt shows begin? Any information or web site links
>would be appreciated. My email address is listed above.>>Than
ks,>Kathy Kansier>Teacher, Judge & AQS Certified Appraiser>Ozark,
Missouri>>>--->You are currently subscribed to qhl as: laurafis
herquiltsyahoo.com.>

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: chintz ovals
From: Neva Hart <nevahartverizon.net>
Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2013 07:08:15 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Kay et al - don't overlook contacting the Pook specialists directly --
they are quite helpful.
Neva Hart
in Virginia




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Can anyone suggest what this quilt might be?
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2013 18:55:19 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Hi Sue -

Sorry for the delay, but I was trying to determine how to describe what
I pictured. And then this auction listing just appeared -- I see
Chariot Wheels when I view the quilt on the right -- minus the
embroidery and pieced background. It's really 4 fans forming the
wheel, and each wheel has 36 spokes, so the child's observation of
"hundreds of tiny pieces which comprised the wheels" would be accurate.

http://jeffreysevans.auctionflex.com/showlot.ap?co45242&weid34425&weiid12760244&keywordquilt&lsolotnumasc&pagenum1&langEn

If this link doesn't work, it's lot 884 of the Jeffrey Evans auction.

Barb in southeastern PA


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Can anyone suggest what this quilt might be?
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Mon, 19 Aug 2013 20:02:02 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

I know that design as wagon wheel

Kim Baird

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Chintz whole cloth quilt fabric
From: Anita Loscalzo <aloscalzyahoo.com>


See Winterthur 1969.0171 for a full-color version of the textile, roller-pr
inted with Prussian blue, noted as English, but suggested to me by Linda Ea
ton to possibly be done in France. The monochromatic version most likely
was washed with an alkali-soap (like lye soap) that caused the blue backgr
ound to turn to brown. Linda Miller has identified thecouple as Leopo
ld and Charlotte from an illustration she found. My best guess (emphasis on
guess) is that the others were bridesmaids or ladies-in-waiting to the pri
ncess.-----------------------------------Anita B. Loscalzo
________________________________----------------------------------
--------------------------------Subject: Chintz whole cloth quilt fab
ricFrom: kaytripletaol.comDate: Sat, 17 Aug 2013 13:48:45 -0400 (EDT
)X-Message-Number: 1Hello All,Sandra Starley mentioned that
she thought you had discussed a quilt from a09 Pook and Pook auction o
n this board. Sorry if I missed it.http://www.liveauctioneers.com/ite
m/6704633Xenia Cord had a quilt with one of the ovals of a couple, an
d I have another quilt with a different oval of a couple from the same quil
t. Xenia felt that it was Charlotte and Leopold pictured in the ovals. Ther
e are other ovals, but we can't really make them out from the photo from th
e auction. Does3Danyone know where this quilt ended up, or recognize th
e fabric such that they can give us more information? I have posted good ph
otos of the two panels on our quilts on the eboard under the fabric tab ask
ing for help with chintz. Thank you!Kay Triplett
--700781406-1035388149-1377009438:79533--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Yard sales & Quilts
From: Beth Bacher <bethbackstitchquilts.com>
Date: Fri, 23 Aug 2013 07:17:19 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

--001a11c2478ebdfcc504e49b8cd8
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetISO-8859-1

Linda, How I wish I had seen your post earlier. I am a quilt restorer
always on the lookout for fabric to use in my restoration work and quilts
with great fabric stories that need a little TLC to bring them back to
life. There is such joy in the process of evaluating an old quilt, decided
what to restore and what to leave as is. The search in finding just the
right shade of fabric and pattern to fit seamlessly into the original
design. The calm that comes with every stitch. OK I know it sounds a
little nuts but hand stitching is my yoga!
If you ever come upon a quilt that calls to you again please put the word
out on this list for a chance to take on the task and to honor the quilt
and the original quilt maker. I'll bet I'm not the only one out there who
feels this way....
Beth Bacher (backstitchquilts.com)
Jim Thorpe, PA

--
*Beth Bacher*
*Backstitch Quilt Repair*


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: UGRR & Antiques Roadshow
From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com>
Date: Sat, 24 Aug 2013 11:08:46 -0500

From the August 2013 "Antiques Roadshow Insider":
MYTH: "Quilts were used as signals on the Underground Railroad a network
of secret routes and safe houses that helped African-Americans escape from
slavery."REALITY: A widely read 1999 book Hidden in Plain View propo
sed that the Underground Railroad employed a secret communication system ba
sed on quilt patterns. For instance displaying the "Monkey Wrench" patte
rn on a clothesline advised runaways to prepare the tools they would need f
or the journey. Historians have almost unanimously discredited this quilt c
ode theory.(Jane Viator Senior Contributing Editor)
Thought you would like to see this.Stephanie Whitson (who sent Ms. Viator a
thank you)

-

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Kernstown Battlefield Quilt Exhibit, Winchester, VA
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Sat, 24 Aug 2013 22:13:29 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Good Evening All -

I've returned from spending a delightful day in the northern Shenandoah
Valley. Two quilt exhibits were highlights (the fog hiding the
mountains not a highlight).

Neva Hart's Hexagon Quilts exhibit at the Virginia Quilt Museum was
excellent -- great quilts, well presented. Unfortunately, today was
the last day and I'm glad I didn't miss it.

The other exhibit is still available tomorrow, and I highly recommend it
-- at the Kernstown Battlefield in Winchester, VA

http://www.kernstownbattle.org/

It's small, but the quilts are very interesting, and in very good
condition. The first thing you see as you enter is a Little Red Riding
Hood cheater/preprint used as the backing of a quilt -- in mint,
unwashed condition.

If Winchester is within your driving radius, and you want a nice drive
on Sunday, I recommend the exhibit. Pam Pampe has done a wonderful
job making this family collection available for the first time to public
view -- and all to benefit the Battlefield.

Safe travels,
Barb in southeastern PA



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Is this legit?
From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieberverizon.net>

Good evening all,

I stumbled across this on Etsy and wondered if it was for real? Did
Ralph
Lauren really cut up old quilts to make clothes?

The two different quilts used to make the clothes look like antique
quilts,
but I have never heard of a designer like Lauren making clothing from
old
quilt.

Anyone else know about this?



The link works fine if you include all the way to the end word
"vintage".




Rare 80s Ralph Lauren Antique Quilt Skirt & Vest Outfit Set, Womens S,
Vintage Size 8 / 6, 28" Waist



Leah A. Zieber

Zieber Quilts


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Is this legit?
From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 25 Aug 2013 08:00:35 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Hi Leah -

Yes, he did. I remember this happening in the 1980s -- before Chinese
import quilts. I remember the fashion media saying he was innovative
to find such a beautiful use for old quilts. My reaction was more
along the lines of " only a rich and famous person living on a different
plane than me would do this." The seller's write up is accurate.

Barb in southeastern PA


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: August 24, 2013
From: Neva Hart <nevahartverizon.net>
Date: Sun, 25 Aug 2013 08:44:56 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Barb Garrett: Thank you so very much for the nice review of the
Virginia Quilt Museum's exhibit. Coming from an expert like you, that
means a lot for those folks who work hard at the museum to please our
visitors.

Next exhibit 'STARGAZING' opens Sept. 3 -- y'all come!

Neva Hart
Volunteer
www.vaquiltmuseum.org




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Is this legit?
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Sun, 25 Aug 2013 06:21:05 -0700
X-Message-Number: 4


<< Lauren making clothing from old quilt. >>

It was as huge a controversy in its day among quilters as was the
Smithsonian quilt reproduction controversy in the early 1990s. Only no one
picketed Ralph Lauren as quilters did the Smithsonian.

And it inspired home-sewers to do the same. I have a vest in my collection
made from an antique 1880s-1890s quilt. I bought it from the owner. I
didn't think to ask her who inspired her to make it from an antique quilt.

Karen Alexander

My Blogs:

Quilt History Reports
http://karenquilt.blogspot.com/

Honorees of The Quilters Hall of Fame
http://thequiltershalloffame.blogspot.com/

Enchanted Quilters of Lopez Island
http://enchantedquiltersoflopezisland.blogspot.com/








----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Is this legit?
From: Mitzioakesaol.com

I have no clothing made from antiques, but I do have a few stuffed cats
made from antique quilts, which I love but also feel so bad about what they
are made from ........Mitzi from VT
PS - I have lots of non- antique but just beginners effort quilts that I
would not feel bad about cutting up


In a message dated 8/25/2013 9:37:26 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
karenquiltrockisland.com writes:


<< Lauren making clothing from old quilt. >>

It was as huge a controversy in its day among quilters as was the
Smithsonian quilt reproduction controversy in the early 1990s. Only no one
picketed Ralph Lauren as quilters did the Smithsonian.

And it inspired home-sewers to do the same. I have a vest in my collection
made from an antique 1880s-1890s quilt. I bought it from the owner. I
didn't think to ask her who inspired her to make it from an antique quilt.

Karen Alexander

My Blogs:

Quilt History Reports
http://karenquilt.blogspot.com/

Honorees of The Quilters Hall of Fame
http://thequiltershalloffame.blogspot.com/

Enchanted Quilters of Lopez Island
http://enchantedquiltersoflopezisland.blogspot.com/


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: New Exhibit opening at the Met in NYC Sep 16 - Jan 5
From: Susan Seater <seatermindspring.com>
Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2013 00:47:47 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

New Exhibit opening at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC Sep 16 - Jan 5
called "Interwoven Textiles: The Worldwide Textile Trade, 1500-1800"

http://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2013/interwoven-globe

Wall St Journal article on the subject of the exhibit and interview with curator
Amelia Peck on Sat Aug 24, 2013

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324108204579023351004486932.html?cblogged0.8810313346707338

Hope I can get there later in the fall!
Susan Seater



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: New Exhibit opening at the Met in NYC Sep 16 - Jan 5
From: kittencat3aol.com
Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2013 06:36:36 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 2


I got to see a preview of this exhibit when I was at the Met doing some res
earch earlier this month. It is going to be stunning - over 100 objects, p
lenty of excellent information. I'm definitely going back for more!

Lisa Evans

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Making something from an antique quilt
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net>
Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2013 06:59:53 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

I actually liked the Ralph Lauren outfit that is for sale on Etsy. However,
I wouldn't ever cut up a decent old quilt to make clothing out of. However,
that being said, if there was a quilt that was not of historical
significance and it had damage in some areas, I might consider doing it. I
don't know, but just thought I would refer to the quilts that many call
"cutters" on places like e-bay. They have areas where there is significant
damage yet some pieces of them are OK. Those quilts don't really have much
purpose at this point in their lives and I kind of thing that giving parts
of them a new life might be a good thing.
I might consider throw pillows or wall hangings or a few other ideas. I
have never done this, but it still would not be ruled out by me if I had a
few quilts that were truly now able to be restored. I have a quilt, by the
way, that I personally made for my son when he was about 10. He tosses and
turns so much in his sleep that the quilt ripped along the quilting lines in
so many places that it is beyond repair. I keep trying to think of things
to do with it, I spent so much time on it and the center is hand appliqued
choo-choo trains and track. The destroyed fabric in it, though, is the
background. Maybe if he has a son of his own, one day, I might make a wall
hanging out of it or something?
Linda Heminway
Plaistow NH



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Ralph Lauren etc.
From: Pepper Cory <pepcoryclis.com>

He wasn't the first to cut up quilts. In the 1920s an interior designer cut
up a number of them for the very nice folks who financed Sturbridge and
made the quilts into upholstry! But once Ralph started seeking out and
cutting up antique American quilts, it really became OK for others to do
so. Whole businesses--clothing, Christmas ornaments, pillows-- depended on
a never-ending (it seemed) supply of quilts. Actually crappy imports came
along just in time to earn their own place in the cutter queue. As a former
dealer in antique textiles, I was, for a while, part of that machinery. My
epiphany came when my cutter quilt customers started "ordering" what they
wanted: "I'd like to see only blue-and-white quilts next time-" and I very
abruptly stopped, examined my conscious and came to the following
conclusion. If it's YOUR quilt, do what you like. But if it's someone
else's quilt, even a nameless someone else, think twice. To me, it feels
like burning books and I shudder. But then again, I still mourn the loss of
the librairy at Alexandria. And I suppose must take my turn in the special
hell reserved for those who cut up antique quilts but think Ralph Lauren
will likely suffer a good deal longer!
Pepper

--
Pepper Cory
Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker
203 First Street
Beaufort, NC 28516
(252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

-

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: old quilts used in clothing
From: <aquilterwindstream.net>
Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2013 8:01:32 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

My brain is fuzzy on this, but I also recall seeing a video clip (possibly on The Quilt Show) about a Pacific Northwest fiber artist who used old quilts in her garments. She was quite reverent in her approach, and talked about the original quiltmakers. It was fairly recent, but can recall no other specifics. And of course bidding sites such as eBay frequently offer what are described as "cutter quilts".

Nancy
www.quiltnans.blogspot.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Fw: Making something from an antique quilt
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>

If you scroll through the archives of our site hopefully you'll come across
the discussions of my experiences with both the Rakph Lauren people and No
rma Kamali people buying perfectly fine antique quilts and cutting them up
to make clothing. These commercial manufacturers no doubt motivated people
to do the same, so many OK quilts were lost in this way as people made mone
y from quilt clothing, That any Ralph Lauren quilt clothing survived, give
they were 19th century browns which could suffer abrasion from handbag stra
ps, frequent closure, etc, is amazing. They looked charming. Don;t forget H
enry duPont upholstered with ancient linsey woolseys and cut early quilts i
n half for drapery panels.Laira-----
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: For Sale Baltimore Album style Repro fabrics
From: Helene Kusnitz <helenekusnitzgmail.com>

I am starting to part with my reproduction fabrics. This is an assortment
of Baltimore Album style fabrics. There are six fabrics between 1/2 yard
and 1 yard. $24 postage included. All prewashed in All Free, and no fabric
softener. For a photo and exact yardage please email me.

Confirmation and insurance extra. US mailing only. Will accept US money
order or personal check(will wait to clear before sending).

Thanks,
Helene Kusnitz
helenekusnitzgmail.com

--
Helene Kusnitz
helenekusnitz.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Ralph Lauren etc.
From: Lynne Bassett <lynnelynnezwoolsey.com>
Date: Mon, 26 Aug 2013 09:16:32 -0400
X-Message-Number: 8

Just a minor correction to Pepper's comment: as the former curator of
textiles & fine arts at Old Sturbridge Village, I do not know of any
quilts that were cut up to upholster furniture by the museum's founders,
the Wells family of Southbridge, Mass. Pepper is probably thinking of
Henry F. duPont, founder of Winterthur.

All best,
Lynne

On 8/26/2013 7:50 AM, Pepper Cory wrote:
> In the 1920s an interior designer cut
> up a number of them for the very nice folks who financed Sturbridge and
> made the quilts into upholstry!



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: New Exhibit opening at the Met in NYC Sep 16 - Jan 5
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>

There will be another exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art: C2'An
"Industrial Museum" John Forbes Watson's Indian Textile Collection', August
12, 201393January 20, 2014, intended to complement Interwoven Globe
: Worldwide Textile Trade 1500931800.http://www.metmuseum.org/exh
ibitions/listings/2013/indian-textilesJudy SchwenderPaducah
________________________________From: S
usan Seater <seatermindspring.com>To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.qui
ltropolis.com> Sent: Sunday, August 25, 2013 11:47 PMSubject: [qhl] N
ew Exhibit opening at the Met in NYC Sep 16 - Jan 5New Exhibit ope
ning at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC Sep 16 - Jan 5 called "Int
erwoven Textiles: The Worldwide Textile Trade, 1500-1800"http://www.m
etmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2013/interwoven-globeWall St Journa
l article on the subject of the exhibit and interview with curator Ameli
a Peck on Sat Aug 24,

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: New Exhibit opening at the Met in NYC Sep 16 - Jan 5
From: textiqueaol.com

The museum gift shop is also advertising this:



Take 20% off $50+ with code AUG13
Now through 8/29.
Use code AUG13 to save 20% on your purchase of $50 or more. Offer ends 11:5
9 pm ET on 8/29/13. Available online only, excluding tax, shipping/handling
, and gift wrap charges. Discount does not apply to the purchase of Museum
Admission, Museum Memberships, donations, eGift Certificates, or prior purc
hases. One promotion code per order. Promotion code cannot be used on initi
al Membership orders. Offer subject to change or cancellation without notic
e.





New Exhibit opening at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC Sep 16 - Jan 5

called "Interwoven Textiles: The Worldwide Textile Trade, 1500-1800"

http://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2013/interwoven-globe



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: August 27, 2013
From: DDBSTUFFaol.com

Speaking of cutting up quilts to make other things, back in the 80's I
had a seamstress who would make very nice throw pillows out of pretty worn out
quilts. I was able to sell the fairly quickly at shows for good profit.
In fact, my profit was so good that I starting to realize that I could
actually make more money cutting up good quilts to make pillows than I could
selling the whole quilt. I finally came to my senses and stopped the
practice.


---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: qhl digest: August 27, 2013
From: msparkfrii.com


Yes, there are times when a client has brought in a quilt for restoration and it has ended up as Nancy
Kirk calls it, "Reformatted". I really like that term. The quilt still retains the good parts of its original
maker's intent, while preserving a portion of it for the family's legacy. Yes, to definitely taking lots of
photos of the quilt before its transformation, and giving these to the family member(s) to hopefully stay
with the quilt going on into the future. If the end product is to be framed, another option is to put an
acid-free paper label on the back that includes short history of the quilt and maker, as well as a picture
of the quilt (and maker if available).

I'm reminded of so many times when a lovely textile donation was brought in to the museum where I
was working at the time - with NO provenance -- oh, so sad. I'm very glad of all on this list that know
the importance of recording something (!) about the history of a cherished textile - so that its story can
continue to be told.

Quilt Restoration Services & Consulting
Restoration & Preservation specialist
Martha Spark
Edmond, OK


--Alt-Boundary-4525.755251485--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt cutters
From: Linda Eaton <LEatonwinterthur.org>
Date: Wed, 28 Aug 2013 08:52:41 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

--_000_F502CF34FF0D1E4782D4D870C78C063483A4221072winex4_
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"us-ascii"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Sadly a large number of quilts were cut up and used to upholster furniture
in the early 20th century. Culprits include Winterthur's founder Henry Fra
ncis du Pont, Electra Webb at Shelburne, and countless others as many deale
rs sold quilts specifically for that purpose. Wanamaker's antiques departm
ent, founded by interior designer Nancy McClelland, imported large numbers
of French quilted petticoats, which had just the right yardage to upholster
an easy chair. There is an easy chair in the collection at Shelburne with
quilted upholstery put on by Wanamaker's, and examples also survive at Win
terthur. I have published a little about this phenomena in my book, Quilts
in a Material World, but there is still undoubtedly much to be learned. I
would be interested to know of other examples.

Linda Eaton
John L. & Marjorie P. McGraw Director of Collections
& Senior Curator of Textiles
Winterthur Museum


<div id3D"disclaimer.winterthur.org"><a href3D"http://www.winterthur.org/email/emp_signature"><img style3D"float: left;" src3D"http://www.winterthur.org/email/emp_signature/banner.jpg" alt3D"" /></a><a href3D"http://www.winterthur.org/email/fb_page.php"><img src3D"http://www.winterthur.org/email/facebook_badge-out.gif" /></a><a href3D"http://www.winterthur.org/email/twitter_page.php"><img src3D"http://www.winterthur.org/email/twitter-follow-us.gif" /></div>

--_000_F502CF34FF0D1E4782D4D870C78C063483A4221072winex4_--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: I'm guilty too!
From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Aug 2013 08:14:46 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

--_045beb35-5718-4e47-8b98-a88d05504e61_
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I am surprised but relieved to read these confessions :-).
My mother-in-law made one quilt. A 1930s trip-around-the-world. She hated q
uilts and quilting ever after. Okay ... maybe she didn't "hate" quilts b
ut she made a point to ask me for BLANKETS for her bed when she visited and
I had quilts on her bed. I think that quilt-making must have been forced
upon her.
What is left of her only quilt is worn faded torn and beyond repai
r. It was given to me upon her passing because I'm the quilter in the famil
y. She has been in heaven for many years now and I think I have finally
come up with a way to repurpose the artifact in a way that will be meaning
ful to her descendants. I drew around my grand-daughters baby-hand to creat
e a pattern for a small mitten. I am going to make pairs of mittens as Chri
stmas tree ornaments for Jane Elizabeth Christensen Whitson's descendants.
It isn't that many but I'm thinking that Mom will be remembered by these
people every year during the holidays. If the descendants don't choose to
use the ornaments that's not on me but at least I will have done som
ething to preserve that rag instead of leaving it in a box in a closet some
where ... forgotten and inevitably to be thrown away by some future descend
ant who thinks I was an idiot for keeping it.
Because of the death of my first spouse and the father of my children and r
emarrying a man who was also a father of grown children and a widower I
have had ample opportunity to have to deal with the perceived "holiness of
the relics" left behind by the deceased. Combining households was quite the
event. I've dealt with angry children because I either was unable to or ch
ose not to keep everything the deceased owned/used/wore/sleptunder/drove/et
c. etc. It's always painful and very difficult and it's a real challenge to
be sensitive to the emotional part of these decisions.
Each individual will make different decisions and each situation is unique.

In the case of my mother-in-law who I dearly loved I think I've come
up with a good solution that she would heartily approve.
The Ralph Lauren photo was "heartbreaking" (my words in my quick response t
o the photo) because it looked like there was nothing wrong with the quilt
he started with and because it happened to be my favorite combination of ol
d colors so I know I would have drooled over the quilt. That kind of cut
ting does give me pause. I once bought a top at a quilt show and considered
that I had "saved it" because it was about to be purchased by someone who
was going to cut it up to make rustic-style Santas from the "tumbler" top f
rom the era of madders and double pinks. I hated the idea because there was
nothing WRONG with that top and because for me as a historical novelist it
was an album of dresses "my ladies" would have worn. I wanted it as an enc
yclopedia. I bought it and I treasure it "just as it is."
At any rate "one size does not fit all" when it comes to these decisions
and while I may find one quilt cut-up heartbreaking I am at the same ti
me participating in the behavior in another part of my life (my mother-in-l
aw's quilt). I guess the difference is I approach decisions like that with
what I hope is careful thought and with the intent of furthering the legacy
of the quiltmaker. But I'm still uncomfortable with the term "cutter quilt
" used by quilt sellers.
Stephanie Whitson



--_045beb35-5718-4e47-8b98-a88d05504e61_--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Virginia Piland's "Tit for Tat" quilt
From: "Mary Waller" <mwallervyn.midco.net>
Date: Wed, 28 Aug 2013 08:09:15 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

Virginia Piland's quoted in a 2008 Richmond Register article about "Tit for
Tat",
"Ralph Lauren took antique quilts and made womens' jackets out of them," she
said. "My goodness, you would have thought he skinned the people alive or
something. The quilters were just really angry about it. So, I decided I
would take his old Ralph Lauren shirt and cut it up and make a quilt." "I
have put a pocket and put pin cushions in there so we can needle him to
death," Virginia said. - See more at:
http://richmondregister.com/x155229447/An-art-a-message#sthash.2moJC5Eb.dpuf

A small photo of Virginia Piland's "Tit for Tat" quilt is shown in this PDF.
http://union-church.org/old/Misc/Quilts%20for%20Virginia%20Piland%20Show.pdf

A full photo of the quilt is at
https://plus.google.com/photos/102155010909513472242/albums/5230460703374083
297/5230465261663948354?bannerpwa&pid5230465261663948354&oid1021550109095
13472242

Another article reported humorist Erma Bombeck was an avid quilter. Who
knew?

Mary Waller





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: I'm guilty too!
From: Ca Cullen <jccullencrewaol.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Aug 2013 09:40:14 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 6



I had a friend with the same dilemma. What to do with an old, very battere
d quilt. Her solution was to take the usable parts and make angel wings ou
t of them while attaching a simply wooden bead for the head. It made the s
weetest angel and brought memories of the maker to mind every Christmas tim
e when they placed the ornament on the tree. There are ways to recycle old
quilts keeping the original creator in mind. CarolGrace



I wanted it as an encyclopedia. I bought it and I treasure it "just as it
is." At any rate, "one size does not fit all" when it comes to these decis
ions and while I may find one quilt cut-up heartbreaking, I am at the same
time participating in the behavior in another part of my life (my mother-in
-law's quilt). I guess the difference is I approach decisions like that wit
h what I hope is careful thought and with the intent of furthering the lega
cy of the quiltmaker. But I'm still uncomfortable with the term "cutter qui
lt" used by quilt sellers.Stephanie Whitson 0909 09 0909 ---

----------MB_8D0720B4259C246_730_765D6_webmail-d142.sysops.aol.com--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: no guilt here either!
From: Mitzioakesaol.com
Date: Wed, 28 Aug 2013 10:38:14 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 7

--part1_7c4b.2171f3cd.3f4f6556_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I might as well get into this - I too have had surprises when almost
discarding an 'old pieced thingy' I found in my husband's grandmother's home
when clearing it out after her passing.......As I was starting to jam thing
old thing (this was before I ever quilted a thing and it was this that got me
hooked for the rest of my life on fabrics, etc.) I noticed the top of the
quilt was tied, yet I saw tiny quilting stitches on the back of the quilt.
Being a nosy person and not having access to any good cutting equipment, I
used my husband's ever ready pocket knife to undo one corner of this quilt
and WOW! there was an older, BUT in better condition quilted quilt there.
I now use this piece of history when I do any kind of talk on quilts and
their histories Don't you all wish these old discards could talk? I do.
Mitzi from VT



In a message dated 8/27/2013 11:57:32 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
peg.binghamyahoo.com writes:

No mea culpas from me, either! I have "resurrected" two pieces that were
both rags, simply rags. One was a pre-Civil war piece (I can hear the
gasps now!) found by my cousin in an elderly lady's attic. It had been
folded up neatly then discovered by some varmints who ate through all the
layers at the folded corners. It opened to a reveal an almost perfect grid
of holes! I made three bears from it which still adorn the recipients
homes.

The second piece was a 1920s/30s tied piece made by a deceased woman whose
family had literally loved it to death. It was absolutely a mess - torn,
frayed, worn through. I had to untie what was left of it, remove all the
remaining scraps of batting, and completely underline it for reinforcement
before making a stuffed animal for the great-great grandson of the maker.
The family was thrilled. With my help, they reconnected with a
long-deceased but beloved relative.

When people ask me if it's ok to resurrect a quilt into a new life by
cutting it up to resew it, I advise them to get an opinion of the piece
from
some authority on antique textiles. As Jean said, some textiles are
beyond
salvaging as a usable quilt and many were not museum pieces to begin with!


So, I have done it before and may happily do it again.

Peg




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilt cutters
From: Mitzioakesaol.com

I can't offer any additional info Linda to your email below, but I was
interested to learn about the Shelbune Museum (VT) and its quilt-upholstered
items there. I have been a volunteer that the Shelburne for 9 yrs.
(hopefully after my husband's death & some illness on my part, I could not do it
this season, but hope I can next year). I will make sure I look up this new
info so I can add it to my data I know about Shelburne's quilts. Think it
would be more interesting to tell the visitors about this piece of history
rather than keep answering " Where can I find those quilts that the
underground railroad used for helping the slaves escape?" .
Mitzi again....


In a message dated 8/28/2013 9:14:02 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
LEatonwinterthur.org writes:

Sadly a large number of quilts were cut up and used to upholster furniture
in the early 20th century. Culprits include Winterthur's founder Henry
Francis du Pont, Electra Webb at Shelburne, and countless others as many
dealers sold quilts specifically for that purpose. Wanamaker's antiques
department, founded by interior designer Nancy McClelland, imported large numbers
of French quilted petticoats, which had just the right yardage to
upholster an easy chair. There is an easy chair in the collection at Shelburne
with quilted upholstery put on by Wanamaker's, and examples also survive at
Winterthur. I have published a little about this phenomena in my book,
Quilts in a Material World, but there is still undoubtedly much to be learned.
I would be interested to know of other examples.

Linda Eaton
John L. & Marjorie P. McGraw Director of Collections
& Senior Curator of Textiles
Winterthur Museum


<div id"disclaimer.winterthur.org">_<img style"float: left;"
src"http://www.winterthur.org/email/emp_signature/banner.jpg" alt"" />_
(http://www.winterthur.org/email/emp_signature) _<img
src"http://www.winterthur.org/email/facebook_badge-out.gif" />_
(http://www.winterthur.org/email/fb_page.php) _<img src"http://www.winterthur.org/email/twitter-follow-us.gif"


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilt cutters
From: silber.julieellengmail.com


Didn't Gloria Vanderbilt do some of this, too?

I recall a magazine photo of a room with a Crazy Quilt covered
with plexi ((?) as the floor. Or am I hallucinating again?


Julie Silber
www.thequiltcomplex.com
510-409-0826



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Cutting Up Antique Quilts
From: lynnquiltaol.com
Date: Wed, 28 Aug 2013 11:11:17 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 10

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
----------MB_8D07217FA85E105_4F4_7D048_webmail-m205.sysops.aol.com
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"us-ascii"


Just pick up Gloria Vanderbilt Book of Collage from 1970. Very shocking what she did,
ceiling, floors, furniture covered with repurposed antique quilts.



Later, Lynn
http://quilts-vintageandantique.blogspot.com
https://www.facebook.com/groups/quiltsvintageandantique


----------MB_8D07217FA85E105_4F4_7D048_webmail-m205.sysops.aol.com--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: no guilt here either!
From: textiqueaol.com
Date: Wed, 28 Aug 2013 12:37:36 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 11


"I advise them to get an opinion of the piece from some authority on antiqu
e textiles."


That is the key for me. But, if someone wants me to cut a perfectly good f
lower garden
so both daughters can have a piece of grannie's legacy, regardless of how m
undane it
is, I'll send them to someone else. Who knows what we'll learn to apprecia
te in quilts in
another 20 years.


I shudder at the thought of adorable pillows and kittens cut from the two d
amaged Margaret
Blosser Quilts...no, it would make me cry...or Julie's Mavericks. (Do I ne
ed therapy for that?)


Jan Thomas



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilt cutters
From: textiqueaol.com

Julie,

http://thepeakofchic.blogspot.com/2010/11/patchwork-of-post.html


(but I'm not sayin that ya ain't still halucinatin)



Jan Thomas

I recall a magazine photo of a room with a Crazy Quilt covered
with plexi ((?) as the floor. Or am I hallucinating again?




-------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilt cutters
From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com>
Date: Wed, 28 Aug 2013 13:59:36 -0500
X-Message-Number: 13

http://thepeakofchic.blogspot.com/2010/11/patchwork-of-post.html
reading the comments is very interesting ... or sad depending on your vi
ew of the whole subject.Stephanie Whitson


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Cutting Up Antique Quilts...an unpopular thought
From: candaceschwenkfelder.com
Date: Wed, 28 Aug 2013 13:14:23 -0400
X-Message-Number: 14

I'd like to venture into hazardous waters here -- though I agree
wholeheartedly that rampant and thoughtless cutting of quilts is a horrible
act -- we could call it violence against quilts -- I'm also wondering what
the fate will be of all the mundane quilts one sees on ebay, etsy, in
antique malls, shops, auctions, shows, the list goes on and on. I don't
think there are enough interested people to care for all of these quilts. We
know quilting was a hugely popular pastime in the 20th century and there are
the artifacts to prove it. Worst off, the level of connoisseurship it takes
to separate the good, bad and the ugly isn't there, which may have answered
my question as to why quilts shouldn't be cut up. ON the other hand, as
everyone well knows, the average person can't tell what is old OR good or
both, and might be attracted more to Nile green waterlilies than mid 19th
century fabulousness.
As someone who is NOT a quilter, nor a collector, but a generally interested
party, I view quilts as only surpassed in surviving numbers by perhaps 20th
century linens and crochet lace (may be exaggerating there, as we could soon
become a society inundated by doilies because of the sheer amount of them).
It's interesting that there isn't the same concern attached to a dresser
scarf with a crochet lace border, also handmade, and sometimes by the same
ladies who quilted.
What to do, honestly? Should all the quilts be saved? (It's like that old
column in Ladies' Home Journal "Can This Marriage be Saved?") Who will save
them? I take some poor souls into the collection here, but I have specific
reasons -- provenance usually.
I think this would be a good discussion to have. And I hope I haven't
stirred things up!
Candace perry
Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center