----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Judy Chicago
From: Jo Major Ciolino <joanniemajgmail.com>
-8859-1

Hi - I'm working on a project and would like to ask you all to take a
moment and share some thoughts on Judy Chicago, The Dinner Party, and/or
the International Honor Quilt. You won't be quoted - I just need some
thoughts of artists / quilters familiar with her work. Thanks!
Joan C.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Judy Chicago
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 2013 12:26:37 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

This is a multipart message in MIME format.

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I've known about The Dinner Party for many years. It is tied in my mind with
my own birth as a feminist, even though I had never seen it in person. (That
would have been 1974)



I was so excited when the Brooklyn Museum acquired the piece. I had a
fantasy of seeing it with my daughter, as an important moment in both our
lives. That has yet to happen, but earlier this year, I did get to Brooklyn
to see The Dinner Party in its new home. The atmosphere is a bit like a
chapel, and I felt like a worshipper at a shrine as I walked through and
discovered many of the details I had been reading about.



Frankly, I used to regard the project as misnamed: it wasn't just Judy
Chicago's Dinner Party, it was made by so many others. After reading
Embroidering our Heritage: The Dinner Party Needlework, I understood that it
was a collaboration and a spiritual journey for all those who participated.
It's an experience that changes people, both in the making and in the
viewing.



The Dinner Party is an inspiration.



Kim Baird

Fargo, ND


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Judy Chicago
From: kittencat3aol.com

I saw the Dinner Party a few years ago after it had been restored and insta
lled at the Brooklyn Museum. It was quite an astonishing piece, very much
in the spirit of both its time and the Second Wave of feminism. I liked it
quite a bit.

I also saw a piece she did for the Birth Project that's currently at Hartfo
rd Seminary. It's beautifully worked, and again, the overall design is ver
y much in the style of its time - but it because showed a mother goddess la
ctating, observant Muslim (and possibly Jewish, and possibly devout Christi
ans as well) women were disturbed by the naked breasts and the mother godde
ss imagery, the Seminary agreed to install a thin muslin curtain over the w
ork. Most of the time the piece was uncovered, but if an observant Jew or
Muslim who might have upset by the nudity, the pagan themes, or the depicti
on of a deity in a graven image, the curtain would simply be whisked into p
lace and cover the image.

It was an elegant solution, and worked very well.

Lisa Evans
Easthampton , MA

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Washington Snowball
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Thu, 5 Sep 2013 12:17:39 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 1

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Funny story: a little over two years ago, my sister-in-law asked me to make
her and my brother a 50th wedding anniversary quilt: All by hand, and a Ca
lifornia King (120 by 120")! I asked how soon it was and she said it was
a while. So I have started two quilts and rejected them; but now have a
lmost finished piecing a Washington Snowball pattern quilt.I asked to a
couple of weeks ago for an exact date as I still have to hand quilt the hug
e thing. It's not until October 2018!Even I can probably make that de
adline.My question is this: Washington Snowball is a pattern from
Clara Stone's 1906 book, Practical Needlework. I do not have a copy of t
he book and wonder if someone who does can let me know if there is any info
rmation on the name origin or if it is another of those early pattern books
that just had names. There are many Washington blocks, but you never ar
e quite sure if it isGeorge Washington, Washington, D.C., or the State o
f Washington. I would appreciate any help anyone can give. T
hanks, best, Don Beld
---837175150-449642408-1378408659:77973--
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Judy Chicago
From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 2013 09:29:26 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

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I saw the exhibit when it first came out....back in ???? It was awe
inspiring. It was at a time when women were trying so hard to rise up in a
way that showed our feminine side and our strong side. This exhibit
encompassed that beautifully.
I still cringe when I hear..... I am not a feminist.....Like it is a dirty
thing. It is all about women wanting respect for being respected.
Lynn Lancaster Gorges

--e89a8f839f1b07287f04e5b7078d--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Judy Chicago
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Fri, 6 Sep 2013 09:44:07 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

Wish I could remember who said this. . .perhaps Gloria Steinem?

Feminism is the radical idea that women are people, too.

Kim

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Judy Chicago
From: Karen Musgrave <karenmusgravesbcglobal.net>

It was Cheris Kramarae and Paula Treichler. I ti s a great quote.

Karen Musgrave




________________________________
From: Kim Baird <kbairdcableone.net>
To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>
Sent: Friday, September 6, 2013 9:44 AM
Subject: [qhl] RE: Judy Chicago


Wish I could remember who said this. . .perhaps Gloria Steinem?

Feminism is the radical idea that women are people, too.

Kim


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Judy Chicago
From: silber.julieellengmail.com
Date: Tue, 3 Sep 2013 11:19:26 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

I am very involved in a big personal project now, and do not have much time to comment in any detail, though I have some things to say about Judy Chicago.

For now, forgive the brevity of this -- I just felt it was really important to second Kim Baird's comment that I was always bothered by the work being called "Judy Chicago's Dinner Party," as I too know who did the actual work, including so much of the creative work as well as the actual needlework. They were not simply apprentices -- they were collaborators.

"Dinner Part" was Chicago's IDEA, and I can see how one could make a case for it bearing her name, and even before the name of the piece. But I found it ironic that this iconically "feminist" piece ended up leaving out credit to the many women artists who worked on it, and made it Judy Chicago's wonderful idea a reality.

How many of the women artists' names have YOU heard? In my view, collaboration should include emphatic credit to the collaborators, even is they are secondary to the (may I say it, ironically?) "IDEA MAN."

What do you think?

Julie Silber


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Judy Chicago
From: tquiltsmac.com
Date: Fri, 06 Sep 2013 12:32:25 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

I saw The Dinner Party in Brooklyn a couple of years ago, and loved it. I have the book Judy Chicago wrote about it too. I'm so glad it has a good location and setting - everyone should try to see it!
Terri Ellis
ISA CAPP
mistletoesales.net
tquiltsmac.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Judy Chicago
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 2013 20:08:50 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

I think the achievement speaks for itself.
Kim

-
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Judy Chicago
From: <judy.growcomcast.net>
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 2013 21:30:01 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

From the 14th/15th century on, there have been workshops, or ateliers, where
the one named artist got students or some others to do a substantial part of
the work based on the MASTER'S IDEA and/or drawing or cartoon. Always, the
master oversaw and put the finishing touches on so that his "hand" would be
seen. Techniques used had to match his own.

Here's just one example:
13-year old Michelangelo was apprenticed to Florentine painter Domenico
Ghirlandaio. "Michelangelo's time in Ghirlandaio's workshop was marked with
conflict, and his training there ended after only a year. Although he later
denied that Ghirlandaio had any influence on him, he surely learned the
technique of fresco painting from him, and his early drawings show some
evidence of drawing methods used by Ghirlandaio."

Here's another:
Claes Oldenberg's soft sculptures were sewn by NYC ladies on their own
sewing machines -- I knew two of them.

It has been ever thus.

Judy Grow


>For now, forgive the brevity of this -- I just felt it was really important
>to second Kim Baird's comment that I was always bothered by the work being
>called "Judy Chicago's Dinner Party," as I too know who did the actual
>work,
>including so much of the creative work as well as the actual needlework.
>They were not simply apprentices -- they were collaborators.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Judy Chicago
From: linda laird <clproductsgmail.com>
Date: Mon, 9 Sep 2013 19:12:14 -0700
X-Message-Number: 3


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I was fortunate to see The Dinner Party in San Francisco. The catalog
was titled: The dinner party, Judy Chicago: An exhibition conceived by
Judy Chicago and executed by her in cooperation with a working community
of women and men. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. San Francisco,
California, March 16-June 17. 1979.

I was a quilter, weaver, seamstress, embroiderer, crafty and just
emerging from a bad marriage as a displaced housewife. Yes, younguns,
that's what they called us. I had just taken classes in assertiveness
training and women's studies.

This stunning room devoted to the celebration of women from the floor to
the knives was just astounding. I stayed the whole afternoon unable to
take in what it all meant. To put together such a beautiful work of art!
And it was a table that commemorated all the meals women have survived.
I've not been that excited by much art, well some. This installation
told me to create, to collaborate, to celebrate. It also taught me more
about women in history than any textbook, representing concretely in
beauty the women that came before and pushed me out into the world.

I bought the book, The Dinner Party: a symbol of our heritage which is
still on my shelf and I've gone back periodically to look at the thirty
nine guest women's plates. Also read about the 999 women whose names
were inscribed on the floor. It's a fascinating book that contains
entries from Chicago's diaries as well as those of her collaborator's.
Many of the men and women who worked on the project when googled appear
to have gone on to be known in their art endeavors. Chicago has too. The
whole work stands as an important, seminal, feminine collaborative work
of art in my mind.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Judy Chicago
From: "Dr. Elizabeth A Richards" <elizabeth.richardsualberta.ca>
Date: Mon, 09 Sep 2013 20:28:58 -0600
X-Message-Number: 1

I wanted to comment on the Judy Chicago exhibit. While I have seen it, I
think twice, it wasn't until the discussion here that I thought about
all the women who stitched to make that exhibit possible.

If you do get a chance to see it take a pair of small binoculars. They
are great for seeing the detail. I took my husband the first time I saw
it and I could hardly get the binoculars away from him. He went in
protesting and came out quite amazed.

Elizabeth Richards
Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

--
Dr Elizabeth A Richards
elizabeth.richardsualberta.ca



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: The Dinner Party
From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 2013 09:03:48 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

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I havent looked at my Dinner Party book in years. All this discussion make
s me want to dig it out of the shelves and put it by my bed where it would
languish unread with the other stacks of books I want to dig my way t
hrough.

Teddy Pruett
www.teddypruett.com
I'm sure I have the smartest pillow in the world. At night when I lie down
everything in my head drops right into it.

--_08270365-5756-445d-a4a2-2856a53df7a7_--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: The Dinner Party
From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com>
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 2013 09:06:59 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3

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Love this discussion. I was unaware of the work and had never heard of Judy
Chicago. It wish it had been part of my women's history course a couple of
years ago. Seems to me it would have been an excellent part of it. I may e
-mail my professor and suggest it.
Stephanie Whitson

--_6a257b1e-049d-4430-b9d3-6b958352e461_--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: FW: Re: Judy Chicago
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 2013 11:27:15 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4


Judy Grow's comments bring to mind artists today including Chihuly (blown
glass work) and what about Kaffe Fassett? The master designs the piece and
the trained artists carry it out under his direction. Not to say that's the
same as the Dinner Party quilt - I have not seen it in person. I do think
credit should be given to those that work on it...and then there is the
Sears Quilt Contest at the 1933 World's Fair...we know the winner got
'caught' - she didn't sew any of it but took the prize money nevertheless!
jean


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Judy Chicago
From: silber.julieellengmail.com
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 2013 11:40:00 -0700
X-Message-Number: 5



Hi Judy,

Thanks for commenting.

46rom my perspective, you rather make my point. (see below for Judy's comments)

Yes, it has been EVER THUS -- and I thought Chicago was questioning many aspects of the "ever thus."
Isn't that the point of the CONTENT of Dinner Party?.

So I personally found it ironic that the FORM, if we can call it that, of a heavily top-down, hierarchical, "master"
oriented (credit) system felt OK to Ms Chicago. It was, and is still billed as a radical, feminist "statement -- a
protest, of you will, of the "ever thus."

No???

I mean why NOT at least acknowledge that YES, it was the "master's" (note the term) overall IDEA, but each
place setting was created by women whose own creativity remains largely anonymous.

These women, if I understand it correctly, were NOT simply "apprentices" carrying out Chicago's ideas for the
individual works that made up the whole. They were autonomous artists in their own right(s) who carried out
their own personal interpretations of the women they were "portraiting" in the place settings.

This was a departure from the ever-so "system" of apprenticeship you cite. Sounds like Oldenburg had the idea,
did a drawing or perhaps a miniature and women who had skills in sewing made real his creation. No creativity
required for that --only sewing skills. Helpers, not artists.

Picasso drew designs for pottery. Skilled potters thencarried out his completely developed work. Helpers, not artists.

Chicago's "collaborators" played a much more active, vital, creative (artistic) role in the finished work. So where
are THEIR names?

Interesting discussion. I am heartened to hear some of the comments mention that they had never before thought
about the women who collaborated.




--Apple-Mail_4F6F2219-F920-4DAD-AB91-2220F6DA110B--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Judy Chicago Dinner Party
From: sgmunseycomcast.net
Date: Tue, 10 Sep 2013 21:27:04 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 6

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When "The Dinner Party" exhibit appeared in Boston, yea many years ago, I was early in my professional climb and competing with newer grads 10 or 15 years younger than myself. Not a "displaced woman" like Linda, because I was very much married to a truly supportiveman, a big exceptional for the time. We had two daughters in elementary school, but I was train commuting to Boston from the suburbs while his job was closer to home. Fran, one of my professional friends, a "displaced woman" with two high school age daughters, invited me to join her to visit the exhibit.She became "displaced" when the husband she had worked for years to "Put Hubby Thru" his engineeringdegrees, decided that she and their daughters didn't need his help and support to seek higher education. Not an unusual attitude then. Luckily,a judge ruled differently in the divorce proceedings, a bit more unusual. She was beginning the journey facing a new female PhD climbing the daunting ladder from part time instructor to eventual full professor - and even department head at alocal university.

Held in an arena-like building, not a typical art venue, the setting provided real focus on the display - no distractions. Fran and I were overwhelmed by what we saw. We had never imagined the women's history that lay before us. Fran's exposure to the classics and the arts was greater than mine, so she helped me comprehend some of what I was seeing. Although she wasn't unfamiliar with needlework, I had more experience in how-to of thebreadth of techniques on display. "The Dinner Party" was a Wonder! But, it presented a picture and delivered a message that women desperately needed to hear and know in the 70's. Even if we didn't realize that we needed to see it and hear it. We were astonished, thrilled, reverent, awed, overwhelmed, and unable to totally appreciate it. Judy Chicago's project, in spite of the fact that she didn't "DOIT ALL", and probably because she DIDN'T, signaled to us that women - and men, could band together to create something larger and more comprehensive than anyONE is able to do. To me, it isn't important that the Judy Chicago name is the one up front in the big letters. The impetus to start and keep it going is an art in itself taking considerable courage and effort with success or failure squarely on her shoulders. Another lesson for that - and this time. Therefore, while I recognize Julie's point, and agree with it at some level, it wasn't then and isn't now a liability or a deal breaker.

It was several years later that I ran across a copy of the Judy Chicago book in a second hand sale. I brought it home. "The Dinner Party" was again a wonder to me when I read it. Or go back to it again and again.

But I have another Wonder. This time more of a Why. Judy Chicago later initiated a Birth Project. I evensubmitted asample of some needlework for consideration. But an exhibit focused on "birth" did not raise the interest, circulation, or notice that "dinner" did. I think I recall some controversy at the time. Certainly the publicity was less. Was "birth" too dangerous a subject
to confront in the 70's? "Dinner" being acceptable and OK, because "dinner" is done in public? Because "dinner" is an act that everyone may- and does - engage in publically? And, Judy Chicago's "Birth" was designed to confront the viewer. And, what is the message about "birth" today with photos of "baby bumps" in every supermarket magazine rack?

Why hasn't there been a revival of both "Dinner" and "Birth"? Perhaps we women (and men)need to seeboth again. Just thinking.

Sandra on Cape Cod
About to celebrate wedding anniversary #54 with that same supportive husband
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Hayes Corner
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 2013 11:44:09 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 1

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Once again asking for some help. I have found a block called Hayes Corne
r. Brackman shows it being from Beth Gutcheon's book The Perfect Patchwo
rk Primer, 1973. I am afraid I have to admit my ignorance and say I have
never heard of Ms. Gutcheon or the book. Does anyone have a copy?
What my dilemma is that I don't know if the name refers to President Rut
herford B. Hayes; or more likely, to Hayes Corner, New Hampshire. Does a
nyone out there know or have an idea? best, Don
---837175150-1366571718-1378925049:45301--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Hayes Corner
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 2013 14:17:17 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

I have made that design. Mine was a copy of an Amish quilt I saw in a
book.

Beth Gutcheon was once married to the late Jeffrey Gutcheon. Both of
them
discovered patchwork and wrote books in the 1970's in New York City.
Beth
later became a novelist, and Jeffrey had a fabric wholesale business on
the
west coast. He was also a jazz pianist.

The book is a standard, and should be in any good textile library.

Kim
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: hayes corner
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>

re this pattern, I have encountered it only from Pennsylvania Amis
h communities- I forget which town or group, but recall some being publishe
d in Quilt Engagement Calendars. So I assume the name refers to some locale
there, not elsewhere. I have had vthe pattern in solid cotton pastels c. e
arly 20th century, several times, but not often enough for me as I love the
complexity of the pattern that sort of combines log cabin variations using
narrow strips of fabric.Laura Fisher atFISHER HERITAGE305 East
61st Street5th floorNew York, NY 10065tel: 212/ 838-2
596;cell:917/ 797-1260web: www.laurafisherquilts.comemail: fish
erheritageyahoo.comfacebook: Laura Fisher Quilts
--361483536-1362020406-1378930359:42836--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hayes Corner
From: aharkins5216comcast.net
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 2013 21:02:03 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 4

------_Part_2903994_1105153902.1378933323466
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetutf-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Don, if you know how (and I don't), check prior threads on the Facebook Vintage/Antique Quilts group. That name sounds familiar to me and I think we have talked about it before, maybe even posted some photos. Anna

--
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: ?utf-8?B?V29tZW7igJlzIFJlbGllZiBDb3JwcyA?
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>

Hello all,I am posting this inquiry from a lady doing research on the Wo
men99s Relief Corps. If you have anything for her, please emai
l her directly.Thank you!Judy SchwenderI am look
ing for information on a quilt made by Mary Morgan, some 20 years after the
Civil War, approximately 1883 when the Women99s Relief Corps was ma
de the official auxiliary of the Grand army of the republic.The
quilt contained motifs (embroidered?? in red on a white background) such a
s WRC badge, GAR badge, various corps badges for the Army, insignia f
or the Loyal Legion, the Army of the Potomac and so forth.Any s
imilar quilts or information on these mentioned would be most helpful.
I am researching the Women99s Relief Corps and community activit
ies of women during and after the Civil War.Dr. Florence K. Wil
liamsflokhwmsverizon.net
---747684034-221040733-1378935324:20828--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Chicago exhibit
From: Dee Dadik <deedadikatt.net>
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 2013 17:45:35 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

One of the sites I visited on line had a statement that the individual artis
ts were listed on the installation site. Dee

Sent from my iPad


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Chicago exhibit
From: Julie Silber <silber.julieellengmail.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 2013 15:17:53 -0700
X-Message-Number: 7

Dee Dadik,

That makes me happy -- that the individual artists'
names were displayed with Dinner Party, so I will
shut up now and get off my soapbox.

I feel more confident down here.

:)

Julie Silber


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hayes Corner
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 2013 15:02:48 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 8

--1121015473-33438797-1378936968:81451
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
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thanks Anna, will do. best, Don _______________________________
_ From: "aharkins5216comcast.net" <aharkins5216comcast.net>To: Quil
t History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Wednesday, September 1
1, 2013 2:02 PMSubject: [qhl] Re: Hayes Corner Don, if you kno
w how (and I don't), check prior threads on the Facebook Vintage/Antique Qu
ilts group. That name sounds familiar to me and I think we have talked abou
t it before, maybe even posted some photos. Anna -
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Hayes Corner
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>


Once again asking for some help. I have found a block called Hayes Corne
r. Brackman shows it being from Beth Gutcheon's book The Perfect Patchwo
rk Primer, 1973. I am afraid I have to admit my ignorance and say I have
never heard of Ms. Gutcheon or the book. Does anyone have a copy?
What my dilemma is that I don't know if the name refers to President Rut
herford B. Hayes; or more likely, to Hayes Corner, New Hampshire. Does a
nyone out there know or have an idea? best, Don
---837175150-1366571718-1378925049:45301--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Hayes Corner
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 2013 14:17:17 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

I have made that design. Mine was a copy of an Amish quilt I saw in a
book.

Beth Gutcheon was once married to the late Jeffrey Gutcheon. Both of
them
discovered patchwork and wrote books in the 1970's in New York City.
Beth
later became a novelist, and Jeffrey had a fabric wholesale business on
the
west coast. He was also a jazz pianist.

The book is a standard, and should be in any good textile library.

Kim


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: hayes corner
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>

re this pattern, I have encountered it only from Pennsylvania Amis
h communities- I forget which town or group, but recall some being publishe
d in Quilt Engagement Calendars. So I assume the name refers to some locale
there, not elsewhere. I have had vthe pattern in solid cotton pastels c. e
arly 20th century, several times, but not often enough for me as I love the
complexity of the pattern that sort of combines log cabin variations using
narrow strips of fabric.Laura Fisher atFISHER HERITAGE305 East
61st Street5th floorNew York, NY 10065tel: 212/ 838-2
596;cell:917/ 797-1260web: www.laurafisherquilts.comemail: fish
erheritageyahoo.comfacebook: Laura Fisher Quilts
--361483536-1362020406-1378930359:42836--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hayes Corner
From: aharkins5216comcast.net
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 2013 21:02:03 +0000 (UTC)
X-Message-Number: 4

------_Part_2903994_1105153902.1378933323466
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetutf-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Don, if you know how (and I don't), check prior threads on the Facebook Vintage/Antique Quilts group. That name sounds familiar to me and I think we have talked about it before, maybe even posted some photos. Anna

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: ?utf-8?B?V29tZW7igJlzIFJlbGllZiBDb3JwcyA?
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>

Hello all,I am posting this inquiry from a lady doing research on the Wo
men99s Relief Corps. If you have anything for her, please emai
l her directly.Thank you!Judy SchwenderI am look
ing for information on a quilt made by Mary Morgan, some 20 years after the
Civil War, approximately 1883 when the Women99s Relief Corps was ma
de the official auxiliary of the Grand army of the republic.The
quilt contained motifs (embroidered?? in red on a white background) such a
s WRC badge, GAR badge, various corps badges for the Army, insignia f
or the Loyal Legion, the Army of the Potomac and so forth.Any s
imilar quilts or information on these mentioned would be most helpful.
I am researching the Women99s Relief Corps and community activit
ies of women during and after the Civil War.Dr. Florence K. Wil
liamsflokhwmsverizon.net
---747684034-221040733-1378935324:20828--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Chicago exhibit
From: Dee Dadik <deedadikatt.net>
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 2013 17:45:35 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

One of the sites I visited on line had a statement that the individual artis
ts were listed on the installation site. Dee

Sent from my iPad


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Chicago exhibit
From: Julie Silber <silber.julieellengmail.com>
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 2013 15:17:53 -0700
X-Message-Number: 7

Dee Dadik,

That makes me happy -- that the individual artists'
names were displayed with Dinner Party, so I will
shut up now and get off my soapbox.

I feel more confident down here.

:)

Julie Silber


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hayes Corner
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 2013 15:02:48 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 8

--1121015473-33438797-1378936968:81451
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

thanks Anna, will do. best, Don _______________________________
_ From: "aharkins5216comcast.net" <aharkins5216comcast.net>To: Quil
t History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Wednesday, September 1
1, 2013 2:02 PMSubject: [qhl] Re: Hayes Corner Don, if you kno
w how (and I don't), check prior threads on the Facebook Vintage/Antique Qu
ilts group. That name sounds familiar to me and I think we have talked abou
t it before, maybe even posted some photos. Anna -----------------------------------------------------------------------

From: "Kathy Moore" <kmoore81austin.rr.com>

I'm posting my reply for the benefit of others who might also be
interested in this question. As a grad student a few years ago working
at the IQSC in Lincoln, I did some work with several crazy quilts that
had ribbons and other memorabilia from the WRC (Women's Relief Corps).
As I remember is, they were heavily embellished and in moderate to poor
condition due to age and some deterioration of materials.

I cannot remember artifact numbers, but it may be possible to identify
them by going to the website...quiltstudy.org...and searching in the
category "crazy quilts."

Hope this helps,

Kathy Moore



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hayes Corner
From: Susan Seater <seatermindspring.com>
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 2013 14:05:57 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Jan 2013

Request from Dorothy Young for the origin of "Hayes Corner" #1377 in Brackman
published in A Perfect Patchwork Primer, published in 1981. "I'm wondering if
its name is a place name, or perhaps a reference to Rutherford B. Hayes," she wrote.

"Hayes Corner" was published in a Famous Feature booklet, Q Book number 124,
White House Quilts. The short blurb under the block illustration reads" A
pieced quilt honoring Rutherford B. Hayes, noted for his moderation and wisdom,
our 19th president after a hotly contested election due to post Civil War unrest
and carpet bagging." --Rose Lea Alboum



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hayes Corner
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 2013 12:03:03 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 3

---841283783-1888925733-1379012583:30728
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi everyone, Rose as always is a great source on patterns. I have heard
from Beth Gutcheon who stated that the pattern was an original design by he
r in her 1973 book and was named for a friend of hers who lived in Maine an
d was a close friend of E.B. White. I suspect the book with the White Ho
use blocks co-opted the name and block for Hayes, which was my first though
t as well. Goes to show that you never know where things will go once yo
u started looking. So great to Gutcheon for designing and naming the blo
ck; and also credit for later using it to honor Rutherford B. Hayes, husban
d of "Lemonade" Lucy. best, Don ____________________________
____ From: Susan Seater <seatermindspring.com>To: Quilt History List
<qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Thursday, September 12, 2013 11:05 A
MSubject: [qhl] Re: Hayes Corner Jan 2013Request from Do
rothy Young for the origin of "Hayes Corner" #1377 in Brackman published in
A Perfect Patchwork Primer, published in 1981. "I'm wondering if its name
is a place name, or perhaps a reference to Rutherford B. Hayes," she wrote.
"Hayes Corner" was published in a Famous Feature booklet, Q Book numb
er 124, White House Quilts. The short blurb under the block illustration
reads" A pieced quilt honoring Rutherford B. Hayes, noted for his moder
ation and wisdom, our 19th president after a hotly contested election due t
o post Civil War unrest and carpet bagging." --Rose Lea Alboum-
--You are currently subscribed to qhl as: donbeldpacbell.net.To unsu
bscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1870667Wlyris.quiltropolis.com
---841283783-1888925733-1379012583:30728--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hayes Corner
From: aharkins5216comcast.net

"Lemonade"???

-
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hayes Corner
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 2013 13:20:38 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 5

---837175150-945090927-1379017238:91882
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Lucy Hayes was a prohibitionist and refused to serve any alcoholic beverage
s in the White House--served lemonade instead. Thus the nickname "Lemonade"
Lucy; and why the Double T block is associated with her. best, Don
________________________________----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hayes Corner
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>

can you posta picture of the block? perhaps it is not the same one as se
en in the Amish PA ones I have been shown.LLaura Fisher at
FISHER HERITAGE305 East 61st Street5th floorNew York, NY 10065
tel: 212/ 838-2596;cell:917/ 797-1260web: www.laura
fisherquilts.comemail: fisherheritageyahoo.comfacebook: Laura Fisher
Quilts>________________________________>

Sent: Thursday, September 12
, 2013 2:03:03 PM >Subject: [qhl] Re: Hayes Corner >>Hi everyone,
Rose as always is a great source on patterns. I have heard from Beth Gutche
on who stated that the pattern was an original design by her in her 1973 bo
ok and was named for a friend of hers who lived in Maine and was a close fr
iend of E.B. White. I suspect the book with the White House blocks co-opted
the name and block for Hayes, which was my first thought as well. Goes to
show that you never know where things will go once you started looking. So
great to Gutcheon for designing and naming the block; and also credit for l
ater using it to honor Rutherford B. Hayes, husband of "Lemonade" Lucy. bes
t, Don >>>________________________________


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Hayes Corner
From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net>

Laura-

The one I made, copied from an Amish one I saw in a book, was a variation
on the simple nine patch. Alternate corner squares were made of triangles,
and colors were planned so that one half of the block was light, and one
dark.

It can be turned and set in the same way that log cabins can be, to make
overall patterns.



It's also called a split nine-patch, as shown on this web page:

http://www.quilterscache.com/QuiltBlocksGalore45.html






------_NextPart_000_0112_01CEB05E.F6C604F0--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: ?utf-8?B?UmU6IFtxaGxdIO+7v1JFOiBbcWhsXSBXb21lbuKAmXMgUmVsaWVmIENvcnBz?
?utf-8?B?IA?
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 13 Sep 2013 07:34:42 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 3

--1344379368-1397275473-1379082882:3726
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetutf-8
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Thank you, Kathy! This is a big help.Best regards,Judy Schwende
rFrom: Kathy Moore <kmoore81austin.rr.com>To: Q
uilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Thursday, September
12, 2013 11:59 AMSubject: [qhl] EFBBBFRE: [qhl] Women99s Reli
ef Corps I'm posting my reply for the benefit of others who might
also be interested in this question. As a grad student a few years ago work
ing at the IQSC in Lincoln, I did some work with several crazy quilts that
had ribbons and other memorabilia from the WRC (Women's Relief Corps). As I
remember is, they were heavily embellished and in moderate to poor conditi
on due to age and some deterioration of materials.I cannot remember a
rtifact numbers, but it may be possible to identify them by going to the we
bsite...quiltstudy.org...and searching in the category "crazy quilts."
Hope this helps,Kathy Moore
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: NYTimes: Threads of Many Cultures, Embroidering a World
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>

http://nyti.ms/1d8WkBC NYTimes: Threads of Many Cultures, Embro
idering a World9CInterwoven Globe: The Worldwide Textile Trade
, 1500-1800, opening on Monday at the Met, surveys a cross-cultura
l pollination of styles, materials and techniques.
--1344379368-208289800-1379105329:17397--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: NYTimes: Threads of Many Cultures, Embroidering a World
From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com>


Oh My goodness ... this exhibit looks unforgettable mesmerizing ... .
And Denzel Washington in A Raisin in the Sun? Be still by heart ...
Stephanie Whitson

--_974cb7c3-d431-442a-9547-697a39235437_--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: NYTimes: Threads of Many Cultures, Embroidering a World
From: quiltnsharroncharter.net
Date: Sat, 14 Sep 2013 11:49:45 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

------_Part_43777601_1424693287.1379173785658
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetUTF-8; formatflowed
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Disposition: inline


What a wonderful exhibit this must be. Once again I'm going to find out
how to refer this to the person in charge at the Museum of Fine Arts in
Houston. I'm sure they know about it and they usually ignore my emails
but I must keep trying. Thank you for sharing, Judy. Best
regards..................

~~~~~~~~~~~
Sharron K. Evans
www.treetopquilting.com
Phone: 713-594-6876
Spring, TX
~~~~~~~~~~~


On Fri, Sep 13, 2013 at 3:48 PM, Judy Schwender wrote:

>

http://nyti.ms/1d8WkBC <http://nyti.ms/1d8WkBC>
<http://nyti.ms/1d8WkBC>

NYTimes: Threads of Many Cultures, Embroidering a World

9CInterwoven Globe: The Worldwide Textile Trade, 1500-1800,
opening on
Monday at the Met, surveys a cross-cultural pollination of styles,
materials and techniques.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Online slide show of "The Dinner Party"
From: carylschuetzyahoo.com
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 2013 07:28:54 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 1

---908725958-996202934-1378996134:94994
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I just re-posted the link for viewing Judy Chicago's "The Dinner Party" on my blog: http://woodhavenstudio.wordpress.com from the Brooklyn Museum's exhibit. You can see their online slide show of the exhibit from their link. This should answer many questions.
Caryl

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hayes Corner
From: stonhavnyahoo.com
Date: Wed, 11 Sep 2013 13:11:40 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

--1844268657-1674410030-1378930300:95273
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hi Don,
We just got back from a visit out of state to children and I came up to my studio, got my e-mails and there you are.
Hayes Corner was shown in Famous Features booklet 124 White House Quilts. The paragraphs under the block state " A pieced quilt honoring Rutherford B. Hayes, noted for his moderation and wisdom, our 19th president after a hotly contested election due to post Civil War unrest and carpet bagging." Also shown in this booklet is The Lucy Hayes Quilt, wife of Rutherford B. Hayes. Hope that this helps you out.

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt study program at the DAR Museum
From: resmarcomcast.net
Date: Thu, 12 Sep 2013 14:58:14 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Announcing a series of lecture/quilt study programs at the DAR Museum!
Monthly Textile Tuesdays begin October 8th. Contact Alden O92Brien at
museumdar.org to register.

We are beginning a monthly series of quilt study sessions, held on the
afternoon of the 2nd Tuesday of each month, featuring a short slide lecture
followed by up-close examination of several quilts from storage, and
concluding with tea/cold drink and cookies/snack. The series will raise
money for, and highlight quilts about to be exhibited in, our upcoming
exhibit on early Maryland and Virginia quilts, opening in Oct. 2014 and
running through August 2015 (mark your calendars!).

Each month will focus on a different motif, style, region, technique or theme. Registration required; program will be canceled if fewer than 5 enroll; max. 22. The $20 per person fee goes toward conservation of quilts selected for the exhibit. (Pay in advance for all three of the first series for only $45.)

Oct. 8: Fabulous Florals. As the gardening season draws to a close, come see some of our most beautiful floral applique quilts, including several from Maryland and Virginia that will be highlights of next year's exhibit. Nov. 12: Stuffing. Difficult to see in photos are the frequently stunning details of quilting and stuffed-work. Before Thanksgiving, come see some breathtaking examples from Maryland and Virginia (and probably we'll choose some from elsewhere) of the other kind of stuffing! Dec. 10: Stars of the Collection. The Virginia, Mathematical, Lone, or
(in this holiday season) Bethlehem Star is one of the early, and enduringly popular, quilt designs. We92ll look at our c.1800 Virginia star from Jefferson Co (now West Virginia), an 1840s one from Maryland, our fantastic 1850s red and green eye-popper, and several more to examine the different choices quilters made with fabric selection and corner treatments. 2014 programs will be announced later this fall.

If you are traveling to the DC area, see if you can join us. Debby Cooney

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Henry VIII's quilts
From: April Carter <abcarter42gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 15 Sep 2013 22:21:57 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

--001a11c2fc0ee784d804e677b4dc
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetISO-8859-1

Hi!
My name is April Carter, and I'm new to the list. I'm a medieval re-enactor
with the Society for Creative Anachronism, as well as a quilter and general
history nerd. I've been planning to start work on a whole cloth quilt in a
mid-16th century style. I'm still researching the project, and I'm having
trouble finding sources. I've requested a transcription of the 1547
inventory of Henry VIII's possessions through inter-library loan, and I
have copies of all of the relevant articles from the Medieval Clothing and
Textiles journal. Can anyone recommend some good sources?

Thanks!
April


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Henry VIII's quilts
From: aharkins5216comcast.net

Wow April! That's so much earlier than anything I know about. Good luck with your research, and please share your findings with us.On a side note, you may be interested in a modern piece held by the Cedarburg Wisconsin Museum: a long quilted coat with six gores showing Henry's wives. Anna Harkins

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Henry VIII's quilts
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>

did Henry get a new quilt made for every wife, or did they all use the same
old one?!Laura Fisher atFISHER HERITAGE305 East 61st Street
5th floorNew York, NY 10065tel: 212/ 838-2596;cell:
917/ 797-1260web: www.laurafisherquilts.comemail: fisherheritagey
ahoo.comfacebook: Laura Fisher Quilts>_________________________
_______> From: "aharkins5216comcast.net" <aharkins5216comcast.net>>
To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> >Sent: Monday, Septe
mber 16, 2013 9:38 AM>Subject: [qhl] Re: Henry VIII's quilts> >
>Wow April! That's so much earlier than anything I know about. Good luck wi
th your research, and please share your findings with us.On a side note, yo
u may be interested in a modern piece held by the Cedarburg Wisconsin Museu
m: a long quilted coat with six gores showing Henry's wives. Anna Harkins


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hayes Corner
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>

thanks Rose. The Famous Features pattern apparently comes after Beth
Gutcheon's book and pattern and she claims design and name are hers. I s
uspect the folks at Famous Features assumed it was named for Rutherford B.
Hayes, but according to Beth it was named for a friend of hers. Interest
ing how names and reasons get mixed up. Thanks again, best, Don
________________________________


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hayes Corner
From: "Kathy Moore" <kmoore81austin.rr.com>
Date: Mon, 16 Sep 2013 11:03:54 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

I think we can consider this a case study in the difficulty of
attributing
names to patterns!

Kathy Moore
Round Rock, TX

-
________________________________
From: Rose Alboum <stonhavnyahoo.com>
To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com>
Sent: Wednesday, September 11, 2013 1:11 PM
Subject: [qhl] Re: Hayes Corner


Hi Don,
We just got back from a visit out of state to children and I came up to
my
studio, got my e-mails and there you are.
Hayes Corner was shown in Famous Features booklet 124 White House
Quilts.
The paragraphs under the block state " A pieced quilt honoring
Rutherford B.
Hayes, noted for his moderation and wisdom, our 19th president after a
hotly
contested election due to post Civil War unrest and carpet bagging."
Also
shown in this booklet is The Lucy Hayes Quilt, wife of Rutherford B.
Hayes.
Hope that this helps you out.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: THANK YOU
From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com>

I just wanted to thank whoever it was who posted the photo of the "wagon wh
eel" and the "crazy quilt" with the embroidered elephant that were going to
be auctioned online a few weeks ago. They are happily residing at my home
and I LOVE LOVE LOVE them. The world of online auctions was virtually unkno
wn to me but having grown up going to auctions I had a great time tha
t Saturday watching things go by on my computer and learning.
In fact I purchased TWO lots that day and am also delighting in a rug
another quilt (I could only see one corner but it turned out to be a madde
r album block with "that" green sashing and glorious madder backing) a s
tack of very old foundation pieced log cabins that someone was taking apart
from a once gorgeous quilt and two lovely 19th century blocks that are
currently posed on the quilt ladder where I display seasonal quilts.
At any rate I had a ball ... and added three quilts a stash of blocks
and a wool rug to my collection for $100 (plus shipping).
It was dangerously enjoyable.
THANK YOU.]
Because of the elephant (the quilt actually had two embroidered elephants)
I'm learning about 19th century circuses on the great plains. I blogged
about "buying three elephants" that week ...
Stephanie Whitson

--_e9779d2b-b31c-4f31-9d3a-d1ee30ef7db3_--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Hayes Corner
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>
Date: Mon, 16 Sep 2013 09:47:59 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 7

--1121015473-1927679264-1379350079:11373
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

that's what makes it fun--all the different name associated with the same p
attern. None are right, none are wrong. best, Don __________
______________________ From: Kathy Moore <kmoore81austin.rr.com>To:
Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: Monday, September
16, 2013 9:03 AMSubject: [qhl] Re: Hayes Corner I think we can
consider this a case study in the difficulty of attributingnames to pat
terns!Kathy MooreRound Rock, TX-----
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: THANK YOU
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Mon, 16 Sep 2013 12:23:05 -0700
X-Message-Number: 8

On 9/16/13 9:19 AM, "Stephanie Higgins" <authorsgwmsn.com> wrote:

<<I purchased TWO lots that day and am also ...>>

Yummy! Photos, please!! <grin>

Karen Alexander




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Judy Chicago Impressions
From: Jo Major Ciolino <joanniemajgmail.com>
Date: Mon, 16 Sep 2013 13:25:46 -0400
X-Message-Number: 9

--bcaec52c5b27a6619904e6837ee1
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetISO-8859-1

Thank you all for sharing your thoughts, memories and impressions of how
this Jucy Chicago project struck you. It will help me work on a plan for
one of her other projects that will soon find a new home!

--bcaec52c5b27a6619904e6837ee1--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Grand Central quilt search
From: cathycityquilter.com
Date: Mon, 16 Sep 2013 14:40:55 -0400
X-Message-Number: 10

--Apple-Mail_18D8E3BB-31AE-45F6-9609-514D389DAF06
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain;
charsetus-ascii

Hello,

I am on a quest to see if there are any extant Grand Central-themed historical quilts, and I was hoping the people on this list might have some knowledge of one or perhaps point me in the right direction..

The reason for the search: we organized a national Grand Central Terminal Centennial Challenge with American Patchwork & Quilting magazine that both celebrated the anniversary of this amazing building and brought to more quilters attention the two fabrics (each in 2 color ways) we created to celebrate the 100th anniversary. The winners and finalists will be presented in a show we are orchestrating with the NY Transit Museum. That show will take place in the Transit Museum's gallery space in Grand Central for about 4 months, with the opening in March, 2014. An old quilt could be a wonderful complement to that show, and hence this inquiry.

Thanks in advance for thinking about this.

Cathy Izzo
The City Quilter
133 West 25th Street
New York, NY 10001
212-807-0390
cathycityquilter.com
www.cityquilter.com

City Quilter Facebook page

Hours:

Tues-Friday, 11-7
Saturday, 10-6
Sunday, 11-5
Monday, Closed





--Apple-Mail_18D8E3BB-31AE-45F6-9609-514D389DAF06--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: feed sack information
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
Date: Mon, 16 Sep 2013 13:54:23 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 11

---747684034-1975330910-1379364863:14957
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hello all,I have posted an image on the fabric tab. It is of a feed s
ack used by the Hershey company in Hershey, Cuba. What is the significan
ce of the "3 - 15" on the bag? What is the significance of the "A-9" on
the bag? I just don't know enough about feed sacks, and would appreciate
any help at all.Thank you in advance!Judy Schwender
---747684034-1975330910-1379364863:14957--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: April's quest for information
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net>
Date: Tue, 17 Sep 2013 06:12:11 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

April: I am certainly no expert but your quest led me to do a bit of
research on my own.
I found this interesting article on line:
http://www.oldandinteresting.com/medieval-renaissance-beds.aspx
I am sure you may already know this information, but I thought I would at
least share if for the benefit of others. I enjoyed reading it and I found
your question very interesting.
If you look on the left of the article there is a blurb there about people
and their wills and you can link to early wills that were made and from what
I read in that article, people valued expensive bedding and it was often
willed to family members. I found it interesting to read that coverlets
would be reversible and lined with silk or fur. I would presume that the
likes of Henry VIII might have had fur? I will be interested to know what
you find out.
Thanks,
Linda Heminway
Plaistow NH



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Henry VIII's quilts
From: kittencat3aol.com
Date: Tue, 17 Sep 2013 06:52:53 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
----------MB_8D081AB31F2AC_1F88_B16A6_webmail-d149.sysops.aol.com
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"us-ascii"




Good question :) We know that he had a quilt worked with his own device (t
he Tudor rose) and the pomegranate of his first wife, Catherine of Aragon;
I even wrote a paper about it a couple of years ago that argued that the qu
ilt might actually have been for Catherine's wedding to Henry's older broth
er Arthur. However, there are NO other heraldic quilts noted in his death
inventory of 1547, nor the early inventory of Whitehall Palace. He did hav
e enough non-heraldic quilts that he was able to give several to the girl w
ho became his fifth wife, Katherine Howard, but we have no information abou
t any designs worked into the quilt.

Alas.....

Lisa Evans



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Henry VIII's quilts
From: kittencat3aol.com

Hi, April! I'm Lisa Evans, author of the article in MCT 4 on Henry VIII's
quilt. E-mail me at either kittencat3charter.net or evansquiltgmail.com
for more information. I'd be more than happy to give you some ideas of whe
re to look for more information.

Lisa Evans

P.S. Which kingdom are you in? I'm in the East, where I"m known as Mistre
ss Sarah Davies.

-
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Henry VIII's quilts
From: kittencat3aol.com


Anna - do you have a link to pictures? That sounds fascinating!

Lisa Evans


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: April's quest for information
From: "Kathy Moore" <kmoore81austin.rr.com>
Date: Tue, 17 Sep 2013 09:06:49 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

I remember seeing a wholecloth quilt in an exhibition of the Kathryn
Berenson collection at the IQSC. It has initials and elaborate quilted
images. It is pictured on page 69 of her book, Marseille: The Cradle of
White Corded Quilting. In the caption she notes the initials/monogram are
"surmounted by a crown and framed within palm fronds tied with a ribbon.
Crossed L's over an M in the monogram could be a reference to Louis XV and
his queen, Marie Leszczynska (1703-68)."

You can probably see an image of this quilt by going to the IQSC website --
www.quiltstudy.org -- and searching their collection. You might begin by
searching the Kathryn Berenson collection or searching for wholecloth
quilts.

Of course, its provenance is speculation until hard evidence can be found
and it is French, rather than Tudor English. But, perhaps it will get your
creative and research juices going!!!

Best of luck,

Kathy Moore
Round Rock, TX



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: new book
From: erwerner3104yahoo.com

I am pleased and very excited to announce that I have published a book, STATE BIRD AND STATE FLOWER QUILTS. Kyra Hicks' workbook HOW TO SELF-PUBLISH YOUR OWN QUILT CATALOG was a great help in getting this out. The book compares 37 sets of birds or flowers for quilts and includes the history of state birds and state flowers. It is available now at http://www.createspace.com/ and will be available from Amazon. They are in the process of setting that up. I hope to also make it available as an e-book on Kindle. I was hoping to bring copies to Seminar but they won't arrive until late September. I will, however, have a proof copy at Seminar if anyone wants to see it.
Rosie Werner
---1491645830-11501
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Henry VIII's quilts
From: Lori Triplett <lori.lee.triplettgmail.com>
-8859-1

April,

You might want to check out the article on period stitches which have some
sample quilts of the period...
http://wkneedle.bayrose.org/Articles/Stitched.html


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: new book
From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>


congratulations Rose, I know how much work goes into putting a book toge
ther. best, Don ________________________________

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: new book
From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 17 Sep 2013 09:07:52 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 9

Rose,What a thrill! This is a subject I am very interested in - I have c
ollected manyStateBird quilts and patterns over the years.When you
have your book in hand I would love to buy a signed copy!Barbara M. Bur
nham... I am pleased and very excited to announce that I have publ
ished a book, STATE BIRD AND STATE FLOWER QUILTS. Rosie Werner


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: THANK YOU
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 17 Sep 2013 09:26:10 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 10

--736800001-1234911292-1379435170:54238
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Nao Nomura did a paper on circus imagery in quilts and cloth, as I recall,
while she was in grad school. I seem to remember a chintz that had eleph
ants on it. You might contact her. I think the chintz might have been
from the collection of the late Sara Dillow, so maybe the IQSC knows where
it is.Judy SchwenderFrom: Stephanie Higgins <authorsg
wmsn.com>To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Sent: M
onday, September 16, 2013 11:19 AMSubject: [qhl] THANK YOUI jus
t wanted to thank whoever it was who posted the photo of the "wagon wheel"
and the "crazy quilt" with the embroidered elephant that were going to be a
uctioned online a few weeks ago. They are happily residing at my home and I
LOVE LOVE LOVE them. The world of online auctions was virtually unknown to
me, but having grown up going to auctions, I had a great time that Saturda
y watching things go by on my computer and learning. In fact, I purchase
d TWO lots that day and am also delighting in a rug, another quilt (I could
only see one corner but it turned out to be a madder album block with "tha
t" green sashing and glorious madder backing), a stack of very old foundati
on pieced log cabins that someone was taking apart from a once gorgeous qui
lt, and two lovely 19th century blocks that are currently posed on the quil
t ladder where I display seasonal quilts. At any rate, I had a ball ...
and added three quilts, a stash of blocks and a wool rug to my collection f
or $100 (plus shipping). It was dangerously enjoyable. THANK YOU.]
Because of the elephant (the quilt actually had two embroidered elephants),
I'm learning about 19th century circuses on the great plains. I blogged ab
out "buying three elephants" that week ... Stephanie Whits

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Mary Pal and Cheesecloth
From: Jo Major Ciolino <joanniemajgmail.com>
-8859-1

This (to me) seems like one of those things that appears to be simple but
in no way, shape or form is simple in execution! Long before I knew who the
artist was, I knew I loved these quilts - having seen them in glimpses when
surfing the web for inspiration. Mary Pal is an incredibly talented art
quilter and I'm such a fan of her work. Since I live by the ocean, I want
to try something along the lines of foamy ocean waves, but I'd definitely
need to take a class from her to be able to realize the concept. Mary was
my most recent Q&A partner -
http://www.whyquiltsmatter.org/welcome/discussion-guide-qa-with/quilts-matter-question-answer-mary-pal/

Take a look and tell me if you've ever done anything like this!?
Joan
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: silk quilts and multiple wives
From: Bunnie Jordan <bunjordaaol.com>


Thanks for the links to medieval bedding and stitching. I just wanted to ad
d that the style continued for awhile. Among Thomas Jefferson's papers is a
n order for a coverlid of crimson mantua which was to be lined with fur. W
ish we knew what happened to it.
Also, re multiple wives: At the Kenmore House, home of Geo Washington's sis
ter, Bettye, is a quilt said to have been made by the three wives of Capt H
ammond. It's a lovely chintz medallion c 1800 and a benefit to us that ea
ch wife continued the work of her predacessor.
Bunnie Jordan
on my way to Charleston and hope to see many of you there.

----------MB_8D0837839E08471_1EEC_302A7_webmail-d293.sysops.aol.com--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Silk quilts and multiple wives
From: Bunnie <bunjordaaol.com>
Date: Wed, 18 Sep 2013 12:41:04 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Thanks for the links about medieval bedding and stitching. I'd just like to a
dd the styles continued for awhile. Among Thomas Jefferson's papers is an or
der commissioning a coverlid of crimson mantua to be lined with fur. Wish we
knew what became of it.
Also, re multiple wives: at Kenmore House, home of George Washington's siste
r, Bettye, is a quilt said to have been made by the three wives of Capt Hamm
ond. I think the second wife died c 1800. It's a lovely chintz medallion. Ou
r benefit that it was kept and finished.
Bunnie Jordan
On my way to Charleston and hope to see many of you there.
Sent from my iPad
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Silk quilts and multiple wives
From: kittencat3aol.com


The styles did change, though. The Lovely Lane quilt doesn't look much li
ke the Indo-Portuguese quilts, and neither style is very similar to the Ben
gali wholecloths, all of which were popular in aristocratic circles around
the same time period. Silk quilts themselves were popular for a couple hun
dred years, but the style of the actual quilting changed as tastes changed.
It's a shame there aren't more very old quilts surviving, since they vary
widely. I'm very lucky in that I was allowed to study the Impruneta cushi
on, which is a small silk patchwork cushion from the mid-15th century, but
I've been trying to get into the Gardner Museum to see their Indo-Portugues
e quilts for close to fifteen years now and have been shot down every time.

Oh well...my time will come... :)

Lisa Evans

Hope everyone has a great time in Charleston!
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Silk quilts
From: Bunnie <bunjordaaol.com>
Date: Sat, 21 Sep 2013 16:32:15 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Lisa,
Of course, you are right about the change in quilting styles. I was just ref
erring
to the " silk and fur and Henry the Vlll " comment and connecting it to som
ething
made in America. Hope you do get to the Gardner and fill us in on your
findings.
Bunnie
And yes, good times and great quilts in Charleston

Sent from my iPad



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Silk quilts and multiple wives
From: April Carter <abcarter42gmail.com>
-8859-1

Yes, the wholecloth quilts of the 18th century are lovely, but the designs
aren't really applicable. I have a copy of Kathryn Berenson's *Quilts of
Provence*, and I love that style. In fact, that's what got me started with
this line of research. There might be some similarity in technique and
perhaps even the placement of design elements, but the aesthetic of the
period is very different. I intend to look to embroidery and textile
patterns for quilting motifs. I think that will get me close enough, if I
can get a little more of an idea of the kinds of quilting designs on the
pieces that Henry owned, I can work from there. I'm sure that on the lower
end of the price scale, people could buy linen quilts with a simple lozenge
pattern, but if I'm going to spend hundreds of hours on something, I'd like
it to be a little more interesting. I'm also looking at size. I know that
Henry owned a couple of lap quilts, and I'd like to get clearer dimensions,
if I can. I'm not sure I'm ready for a state bed-sized quilt!

Thank you all for you input.

April Carter
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Visiting to Bennington VT
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net>
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2013 06:28:26 -0400


My darling husband is being very kind to me and we are heading to Bennington
VT later this week and staying in a Bed and Breakfast in town so that I can
finally see, in person, the 1863 Jane Stickle quilt that is on display right
now at The Bennington Museum. It is the 150th anniversary of this quilt and
I have been working to make a replica of this quilt for probably around 14
years, or so. I pick up and put down this project and have made probably a
dozen other quilts during the time period, quilts for weddings, babies, and
my kids, etc. But, this quilt has been somewhat of an obsession. : )
I have roughly 2/3rds of these tiny 5" blocks done and I have shopped (what
a tough job, right?) for fabrics to match Jane's fabrics as closely as I
can.
So, once in Bennington, though, is there something you would think would
interest my husband in that area? He is being really nice to me, and if
there was a place nearby that would be of interest to a guy who likes
vintage cars, building models, computers and airplanes, I would gladly "put
up" with going somewhere with him as he is doing that for me.

At any rate, if anyone knows of a nice quilt shop in that area, I might also
be inclined to visit.

Getting exciting!

Linda Heminway

Plaistow NH

--------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Visiting to Bennington VT
From: Stephanie Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com>

In the new edition of QuiltMania there is mention of the Janiacs. I was ama
zed that over 100 copies of that fabulous quilt were on display at the even
t (don't remember the exact location but I think it was in Europe). I love
this tribute to how one quilt can change lives in so many amazing ways.
When we were gathering the troops to create the International Quilt Study C
enter and Museum here in Nebraska I remember one of our state senators g
oing on record with some fairly detrimental opinions as to the value of qui
lts and what he obviously considered a waste of money. The poor man had now
idea the ire he would incite when he spoke out that way.
At any rate ... Linda ... I say God bless your husband and may the road ris
e up to meet you!
Steph Whitson

-
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Fw: State Birds and Flowers
From: erwerner3104yahoo.com


https://www.createspace.com/pub/simplesitesearch.search.do?sitesearch_queryState+Bird+and+State+Flower+Quilts&sitesearch_type STORE The link to Create Space that I gave when I announced my new book was not a good one. This one will take you directly to the information about
the book.Rosie Werner
--364747447-485557404-1380051747:2272--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Fw: State Birds and Flowers
From: JLHfwaol.com
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2013 17:28:54 -0400 (EDT)





In a message dated 9/24/2013 4:15:05 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
erwerner3104yahoo.com writes:

https://www.createspace.com/pub/simplesitesearch.search.do?sitesearch_queryS
tate+Bird+and+State+Flower+Quilts&sitesearch_type STORE

--part1_afca2.abc5f.3f735e16_boundary--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Fw: State Birds and Flowers
From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net>
Date: Tue, 24 Sep 2013 18:14:51 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 5

--547783885-16117326-1380071691:81768
Content-Type: text/plain; charsetiso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I think this works: https://www.createspace.com/4410638....arden
(Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, OR____________________
____________ From: Rose Werner <erwerner3104yahoo.com>To: Quilt Hist
ory List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> Cc: "aqsg2yahoogroups.com" <aqsg2
yahoogroups.com> Sent: Tuesday, September 24, 2013 12:42 PMSubject:
[qhl] Fw: State Birds and Flowers https://www.createspace.com/pub/
simplesitesearch.search.do?sitesearch_queryState+Bird+and+State+Flower+Quil
ts&sitesearch_type STORE The link to Create Space that I gave when I announ
ced my new book was not a good one. This one will take you directly to the
information aboutthe book.Rosie Werner
--547783885-16117326-1380071691:81768--

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: link to book
From: Rose Werner <erwerner3104yahoo.com>


For those having trouble with the link to my book:
Go to http://www.createspace.com/. Click on the "site" button and choose "store". Search either on the title, State Bird and State Flower Quilts, or on my name.
Rose Marie Werner
---1827684752-198099976-1380070889:50524--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Fw: State Birds and Flowers
From: JLHfwaol.com
Date: Wed, 25 Sep 2013 10:38:01 -0400 (EDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

--part1_c652f.11aa1111.3f744f49_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset"US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Thank you, Arden. The order went through without a problem. Janet H in
Fort Worth


In a message dated 9/24/2013 8:43:11 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
junkoramacomcast.net writes:

I think this works: https://www.createspace.com/4410638

....arden



(Ms) Arden Shelton
Portland, OR


_----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Visiting Bennington, VT
From: Laura Lane <collectionsnequiltmuseum.org>
Date: Wed, 25 Sep 2013 11:05:32 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

Linda,

Your husband may enjoy the Bennington Museum which currently has a Civil
war display. It also features a permanent display of Grandma Moses
paintings and pottery made in Bennington. Nearby (right down the
street a short distance) he will enjoy visiting the Hemming Motor News
World Headquarters.


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilter's Newsletter issue from 1976
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>

If anyone has a Quilter's Newsletter issue #76from 1976, would you pl
ease email me off list? I am looking for the Hearts and Rings pattern
. It is listed as a 10 pieced block in the QNM Cumulative In
dex.Thank you in advance,Judy Schwendersister3603yahoo.com
-

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: link to book
From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Sep 2013 11:15:47 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 5

Iwas able to order from amazon. It shows only 1 available, maybe becaus
it's print on demand?But I would love to have a signed copy, Rose? Is t
hat possible?Barbara M. Burnham... Search either on the title, Sta
te Bird and State Flower Quilts, or on my name.Rose Marie Werner


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Bennington
From: Pam Weeks <pamela.weeksgmail.com>
-8859-1

Hi Linda,

We were in Bennington a couple of weeks ago. Your husband may find himself
pleasantly entertained by the rest of the museum, even if he chooses to
skip the quilt. It's full of Revolutionary War artifacts, Grandma Moses
paintings, and a good Civil War exhibit. Do check the website for what else
may be on display.

The quilt is diplayed a bit differently than usual, and as it's been
installed on a steeper slant than usual, you can get closer to parts of it.

I wrote an article for their publication, having done further research on
Jane Stickle, which is included in the labeling. BUT, after we published,
the curator, Jamie, found another interesting tidbit. An article about her
was written in the Bennington Banner just after she won a ribbon for that
quilt at the Bennington County Fair in 1863. The article described her as
an invalid woman who pieced the quilt to keep busy, and that she went to
some effort to use a different fabric for each block.

Also on display is a painting done by Jane. I'm continuing to research her,
and think we'll eventually find out more about her.

AND, Bennington is the home of Hemmings, the company that publishes all the
vintage car stuff. It's right down the hill, less than half a mile from the
Museum. I toured their offices a few years ago--it should keep him busy for
at least an hour, I think, if not more.

Best,

Pam Weeks
PO Box 123, Durham, NH 03824
603-661-2245

www.pamweeksquilts.com

--001a11c2bcd6671504e73d187c--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilter's Newsletter issue from 1976
From: Arden Shelton <ardenlsyahoo.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Sep 2013 17:09:20 -0700
X-Message-Number: 7

Judy, don't forget that you can get that exact page photocopied and sent to y
ou through Interlibrary Loan if no one has it. You don't need to know which
library has it; your library will find it for you. Lots of times, they wil
l scan it, so it's in color too! just an fyi from a librarian!....
arden
(Ms) Arden Shelton
Portland, OR


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Grand Central quilt search
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Sep 2013 18:53:35 -0700
X-Message-Number: 8

Back from the AQSG research seminar (fabulous as always) and trying to catch
up on emails.

Has anyone from the QHL list entered this challenge?

<<Grand Central Terminal Centennial Challenge with American Patchwork &
Quilting magazine that both celebrated the anniversary of this amazing
building and brought to more quilters attention the two fabrics (each in 2
color ways) we created to celebrate the 100th anniversary. >>

Karen in the Islands

Quilt History Reports
http://karenquilt.blogspot.com/

Honorees of The Quilters Hall of Fame
http://thequiltershalloffame.blogspot.com/

Enchanted Quilters of Lopez Island
http://enchantedquiltersoflopezisland.blogspot.com/

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: new book
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Wed, 25 Sep 2013 18:55:31 -0700
X-Message-Number: 9

Just ordered the book, Rosie. How exciting for you to get the first book
finished! I assume there will be many more!! I sure hope so.

Karen Alexander


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Bennington
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net>
Date: Thu, 26 Sep 2013 05:45:21 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Just wanted to say how helpful those of you who responded to my request for
information on Bennington. I really appreciate your insights, both those
posted here and also those sent via email. We added Hemmings to our list,
by the way, as we do own three collectible cars. So, we will enjoy both
places.
I'm looking forward to our trip today and I hope we have an enjoyable few
days. We love "new material" to look at and often take rides to a place
we've never seen before just for "entertainment" we find the most
interesting things and places on our little trips. So, even if my husband
might not enjoy the museum (though I think he will enjoy lots of it) we will
always "enjoy the ride".
Thanks so much,
Linda Heminway
Plaistow, NH



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilter's Newsletter issue from 1976
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>
Date: Thu, 26 Sep 2013 09:06:57 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2


Thank you to Rose Alboum who will be sending me a copy of the page I need.
And thank you to others who also responded. I am so lucky to h
ave access to this list!Judy SchwenderFrom: Judy Schwende
r <sister3603yahoo.com>To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.c
om> Sent: Wednesday, September 25, 2013 11:35 AMSubject: [qhl] Quilte
r's Newsletter issue from 1976

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Antique Quilts for Auction in Texas
From: "Lonnie" <lonnie8comcast.net>
Date: Thu, 26 Sep 2013 11:52:16 -0500
X-Message-Number: 3


QHL members,
If you are in The Woodlands/Spring Texas area next week please drop by
our
quilt guild auction. Info is below but let me tell you about a
collection of 10 antique
quilts that were graciously given to us by members.

They date from late 1800's to 1930's. One still has a first place ribbon
on it
from a Texas guild show in 1930!!! The hand quilting on these quilts
will make you cry!!

One is wool, one is a Cigar Ribbon quilt. All are Fabulous !! and there
are 10 more just as fab!!

Go to our site....http://waqg.org or www.waqg.org for pix of the old
and new quilts
listed for auction.
(Some are not pictured yet so check back.)

Ladies, this auction is WORTH driving here for!!
and there are lot's of overnight accommodations available close by.

A portion of our proceeds goes to breast cancer research....The Rose.

tks
Lonnie Schlough


The Woodlands Area Quilt Guild Presents

A HOMECOMING OF QUILTS 2013-Auction
Saturday, October 5, 2013
6pm Preview 7pm Auction
The Grand Palace 314A Pruitt Road, Spring, 77380
http://thegrand-palace.com
http://waqg.org or call 281-298-1966.

The Woodlands Area Quilt Guild invites you to our Fall Quilt Auction
October 5 at
The Grand Palace, 314A Pruitt Road.

Featuring silent auctions, new quilts and quilted items,
a rare grouping of donated antique quilts and donations from local
merchants.

Don't miss this opportunity to bring home your own handmade treasure!

A portion of our proceeds will go to 'The Rose' a non-profit Quality
Breast Health Care Org.
$5 Admission includes 2 drink tickets at our wine bar and a chance for
door prizes


------_NextPart_000_0097_01CEBAAE.D8C26F20--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilter's Newsletter pattern requested by Judy
From: " Barb Vlack" <cptvdeosbcglobal.net>
Date: Thu, 26 Sep 2013 11:55:38 -0500
X-Message-Number: 4

I just sent Judy a scan of the page she requested.

For anyone's interest, I have all the Quilter's Newsletters magazines
from
#1 to at least 400. I'm happy to scan and share for research purposes!

Barb

Barb Vlack
barbbarbvlack.com
I have fulfilled a $1000 fund raising promise for Alzheimer's research
and
am working on a second $1000 pledge. Cheer me on at:
www.AlzQuilts.org




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: On the Same Page Literary Festival
From: Karen Musgrave <karenmusgravesbcglobal.net>
Date: Thu, 26 Sep 2013 12:21:24 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5


--Apple-Mail-7-329442487
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain;
charsetus-ascii

I was a featured writer at On the Same Page Literary Festival in West
Jefferson, N.C., Sept. 18-21. The woman at the arts council was really
concerned about returning books that would not sell. Well, it was such a
wonderful vindication when my book, "Quilts in the Attic," sold out
after my lecture and people were upset that they could not own a copy. I
was told I was the only author to sell out. There were 60 books.

Ken Burrows did a fabulous job moderating the panel discussion. I am
pleased that I was able to hold my own with the other writers-Emily
Colin, Kevin Duffus, Georgann Eubanks, Amy Greene and Janet Pittard.
Kevin and I were the only nonfiction writers and I was the only one
without a N.C. connection. I was somewhat surprised that it was men who
sought me out afterwards and told me that they had not planned on
reading my book but now they would! Another victory!

Maybe one day people will not underestimate the power of quilts.

Karen Musgrave
http://connectionbykaren.blogspot.com


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Bennington
From: YAK1953aol.com
Date: Thu, 26 Sep 2013 21:51:44 -0400 (EDT)


Hi Pam and qhl,
Is there any chance that we can actually read the article found regarding
Jane Stickle and the exhibition of her quilt at the Bennington County Fair
in 1863? And your article written for the Bennington's publication too? I
am so glad to see more information about Jane as I have been a part of the
Janiac movement even before it actually began!
Theresa Arnold
Indianapolis, IN


In a message dated 9/25/2013 7:16:25 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
pamela.weeksgmail.com writes:

Hi Linda,

We were in Bennington a couple of weeks ago. Your husband may find himself
pleasantly entertained by the rest of the museum, even if he chooses to
skip the quilt. It's full of Revolutionary War artifacts, Grandma Moses
paintings, and a good Civil War exhibit. Do check the website for what else
may be on display.

The quilt is diplayed a bit differently than usual, and as it's been
installed on a steeper slant than usual, you can get closer to parts of it.

I wrote an article for their publication, having done further research on
Jane Stickle, which is included in the labeling. BUT, after we published,
the curator, Jamie, found another interesting tidbit. An article about her
was written in the Bennington Banner just after she won a ribbon for that
quilt at the Bennington County Fair in 1863. The article described her as
an invalid woman who pieced the quilt to keep busy, and that she went to
some effort to use a different fabric for each block.

Also on display is a painting done by Jane. I'm continuing to research her,
and think we'll eventually find out more about her.

AND, Bennington is the home of Hemmings, the company that publishes all the
vintage car stuff. It's right down the hill, less than half a mile from the
Museum. I toured their offices a few years ago--it should keep him busy for
at least an hour, I think, if not more.

Best,

Pam Weeks
PO Box 123, Durham, NH 03824
603-661-2245

www.pamweeksquilts.com


---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: quilts with old fabrics
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603yahoo.com>

A lady called me this morning. She has 3 antique quilts that are in fair
condition (fabric loss mainly). She doesn't know where they were made.
One has fringe all around the edge and she thinks it is from the early
1800s. She wants to donate the quilts to someone or a place that would s
tudy the fabrics in the quilts. I told her most museums prefer artifacts
that are in better condition and/or with known provenance. If you or yo
ur quilt study group are interested, please contact her. Her email addre
ss is hartleyrdembarqmail.com.Judy Schwender





---

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: 2014 Quilters Hall of Fame Honoree announced
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Fri, 27 Sep 2013 21:36:43 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1



Such beautiful quilts this woman makes!

Karen in the Islands


Ruth B. McDowell Selected for Induction - July 17-19, 2014


The Quilters Hall of Fame is pleased to announce the selection of Ruth B.
McDowell, of Colrain, Massachusetts, as the 45th Honoree to be inducted int
o
the Quilters Hall of Fame, July 17-19, 2014. Ruth McDowell, a fulltime
professional quilt artist, graduated from Massachusetts Institute of
Technology in 1967 with a B.S. in Art and Design.

Her work has been exhibited in juried, invitational, and solo shows
nationally and in Canada, Europe, Australia and Asia.

The inspiration for most of McDowellB9s 520 quilts to date has come from
nature. Her artistic style has shown consistent development and her unique
approach to pieced quilts has inspired ten books. McDowellB9s 1982 B3Twelve
Dancing Princesses (Or The Shoes That Danced Themselves To Pieces)B2 and B3Th
e
Yellow MapleB2 (1988) were included in the 20th CenturyB9s Best American
Quilts, selected by a Blue Ribbon panel of the top foremost quilting expert
s
of the late 20th century from many different fields of quilting expertise.

Since that first quilt in 1972, McDowell has shared her exceptional design
and teaching skills all over the world and her award winning quilts are
highly sought by collectors.

McDowell wrote her first book, Pattern on Pattern (Quilt Digest Press) in
1991. Her 1996 book Art and Inspirations: Ruth B. McDowell (C&T Publishing)
was a retrospective of RuthB9s career at that point and features full-color
illustrations of 97 of her quilts, many color details and drawings, and a
fascinating text. As Ruth refined her understanding of both the designing
and teaching of pieced quilts, she rewrote and further expanded her
best-selling book Ruth B. McDowell's Piecing Workshop and now offers on her
web site www.ruthbmcdowell.com several of her titles as print-on-demand and
e-books. Visit her site to see many of her more recent quilts and some that
are for sale.

Please join us in Marion, Indiana, July 17-19, 2014 to celebrate and honor
the art and career of Ruth B. McDowell.



CONTACT: Deb Geyser
TQHF OFFICE PHONE: (765) 664-9333
E-MAIL: quiltershalloffamesbcglobal.net
TQHF WEBSITE: www.quiltershalloffame.net
TQHF Blog: thequiltershalloffame.blogspot.com
LOCATION: 926 South Washington Street, Marion, IN
ADDRESS: P.O. Box 681, Marion, IN 46952-0681


The mission of The Quilters Hall of Fame is to celebrate quilting as an art
form by honoring the lives and accomplishments of those people who have mad
e
outstanding contributions to the world of quilting; by restoration and
preservation of the National Landmark home of quilt designer Marie D.
Webster in Marion, Indiana; by promoting programs, exhibitions, publication
s
and research; and by collecting and preserving and documenting materials
related to the honorees of The Quilters Hall of Fame.


--B_3463162603_2799081--


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Subject: Bennington
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net>
Date: Sat, 28 Sep 2013 07:50:29 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

To the person who asked about the article that is part of the Jane Stickle
quilt exhibit, I actually purchased a booklet on the present exhibits in the
museum right now for something like $5.00. I think the article is quoted in
that booklet. When I unpack my bags and find the booklet, I will let you
know. I have not had time to read it yet, myself. The story about Jane in
the booklet is quite lengthy and goes about 4 or 5 pages and shows an 1800s
map of Shaftsbury where Jane was from in it.
If the booklet does have that article in it, I suppose one could call or
email the museum and purchase a copy of it?
I had to buy a copy of that.
I'm going to write my own "Dear Jane" letter in the style of the book about
her quilt about my visit to her quilt and how I tried to find her house and
could not and how I went to her grave to visit, out of respect. I shall put
that booklet, my own letter, as well as photos from my own visit to
Bennington and Shaftsbury inside the front cover of my personal copy of the
Dear Jane book.
Incidentally, I own two copies of the Dear Jane Book, one is a working copy
used to reproduce the quilt and another is a pristine copy that is a
keepsake. In case a few of you might not be familiar with the book, here is
a link to it:
http://www.amazon.com/Dear-Jane-Hundred-Twenty-five-Patterns/dp/1881588157/r
efsr_1_1?ieUTF8&qid1380368723&sr8-1&keywordsdear+jane+book
I find it hard to imagine that there would be members of this group not
familiar with this book, but you never know. Also, perhaps this discussion
will have inspired a few of you to buy the book and try your hand at
actually reproducing this masterpiece? I've been working on a reproduction
of this quilt for about 15 years now and I must say that I am more committed
to finally finishing this quilt now that I have seen it.
And, Pam, my husband really enjoyed Hemmings and I think some of the
exhibits at the museum from the industrial revolution were of great interest
to him. I enjoyed those things as well. It was a bonus to see the Grandma
Moses paintings that are on display there, they are fabulous.
Linda Heminway
Plaistow, NH



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Subject: Tenn Quilt Study Meeting Oct. 9, Athens, TN
From: nedjanaol.com
Date: Fri, 27 Sep 2013 21:42:50 -0400
X-Message-Number: 3

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Tennessee Regional Quilt Study Group Meeting

When: Wednesday, Oct 9 from 10:00 am to about 3:00 pm (Eastern Time)
Where: McMinn County Living Heritage Museum, 522 W. Madison Avenue, Athens, TN 37303 423-745-0329
www.livingheritagemuseum.com

10:00 - Introductions, etc.

10:30 Presenters: Suzanne McDowell, Mary Alton, Jan Wass & Merikay Waldvogel.

Workshop: Documenting Quilts: We'll have two tables with 10 museum quilts on each. Watch actual documentation of the museum's quilts by
our presenters. Bring your own quilt to share. If we have a large crowd we'll start another table with the quilts that are brought in.
This is meant to be a "hands on" meeting.

12:00 - Lunch 96 Bring a brown bag lunch or order a box lunch (See Info Below). Drinks will be provided

1:00 - .Show & Tell (or a continuation of the morning's documentations).

2:00 - View the museum's 2013 exhibit: Year of the Art Quilt - Sept 28 - Oct 19

Lunch: A box lunch may be ordered for $7.00 by contacting Mary Alton, Coordinator of Visitors Services, at maltonlivingheritagemuseum.com or
423-745-0329.

There is no charge for the day. We will pass a hat at the end to donate to the Museum for their assistance providing the venue and the program.

Please publicize the event through guild newsletters, web pages, and Facebook. Spread the word. Bring a friend. Bring a carload of friends!

Directions to the Museum: 46rom South off I-75: Take Exit 49, and bear right on Decatur Pike. Go 3.2 miles until you come to the 6th light (in downtown Athens), and turn right onto Washington Avenue. The Museum will be five blocks on the right.

46rom North off I-75: Take Exit 52 (Mt.Verd Road), and turn left. Travel through four traffic lights to downtown Athens, where the street becomes Washington Avenue. The Museum will be five blocks on the right.

If you have questions, contact:

Jan Wass at nedjanaol.com, Merikay Waldvogel at quiltaliveaol.com, Mary Alton at maltonlivingheritagemuseum.com. .


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Subject: Hershey feed
From: ag32040 <ag3204ol.com>
Date: Sat, 28 Sep 2013 20:40:46 -0400
X-Message-Number: 4

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I had a c-1940 cotton crazy quilt top that wa
s all backed with Hershey feed bags .I live in the Miami area where t
here is a very large Cuban population.The top was loaned to a quilt show
, and there was a lovely Cuban lady that called me and asked me if she c
ould buy it.She told me that there was a city named Hershey,Cuba .Her hu
sband was born there near the factory where Hershey products were made .

Her husband would love it for their 50th- anniversary.He missed his fami
ly that still lived there and this would bring him happy memories.
Of course I sold it to her at a very,very low price [she insisted in pay
ing] I was happy that it had found a good home and was well loved
Amy Goodhart in Miami

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Subject: MOKA Quilt Study Group - mext mtg
From: "Martha Spark" <msparkfrii.com>
Date: Mon, 30 Sep 2013 08:25:13 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

Our upcoming MOKA Quilt Study Group meeting will be on October 18 & 19,
2013 in Edmond and Oklahoma City, OK. On Saturday, Jan Thomas from
Colorado Springs, CO will be sharing her “obsession” and findings about
Margaret Culp Blosser and her unique story quilts.
On Friday evening, Janet Abercrombie Fisher from Edmond, OK (assisted by
Martha Spark from Edmond) will give a presentation on her mother’s quilt
collection titled “Quilts in the Closet: Rediscovered and Renewed” and the
amazing progression of events that propelled Janet’s newfound interest in
researching her own family legacy. Many of her quilts will be brought for
sharing, including a unique WCTU sampler quilt dated 1936 that was
presumably created by her grandmother’s quilt group in Oklahoma.

Fee for the meeting is $25.00, which includes a catered lunch. Deadline to
Register is October 11, 2013.
There are still spaces available.

For more information, please email:
Martha Spark, MOKA Quilt Study Group - Oklahoma
msparkfrii.com
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Subject: Silica desiccant packets
From: Sue Reich <suereichcharter.net>
Date: Mon, 30 Sep 2013 08:30:02 -0400
X-Message-Number: 2

Does anyone have experience using silica desiccant packets with their antiqu
e quilts? If there is a hint of humidity in the air, an antique textile wil
l absorb it. Tucking a silica packets in a box, bag or pillowcase with a qu
ilt might be a good preventative measure. I would appreciate your thoughts.
Thanks, sue reich

Sent from my iPad


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Subject: RE: Silica desiccant packets
From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooneymoonware.net>
Date: Mon, 30 Sep 2013 12:04:14 -0700
X-Message-Number: 3

Good Monday, QHLers - Unless the quilt and (enough) silica desiccant packets
are placed in to an air-tight space/box, it won't be of any assistance. It's
the process of osmosis - lower humidity/higher humidity will even out unless
the space is air-tight. Clear as mud?

You also have to calculate the amount of silica desiccant packets
(conditioned to a certain relative humidity % first) for the given
(air-tight) space to buffer that amount of space to a certain relative
humidity. Here is a link that explains a bit more about it:
http://www.apsnyc.com/uploads/Demystifying%20Silica%20Gel.pdf

The silica desiccant packets also have to be re-conditioned periodically.

Please don't hesitate to contact me off-list for further clarification or if
you have additional questions.
Regards,
Meg
. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________
Margaret E. Geiss-Mooney
Textile/Costume Conservator &
Collections Management Consultant
Professional Associate - AIC
707-763-8694
mgmooneymoonware.net
-------------------------------------------------------
CONFIDENTIALITY NOTICE
This message is intended only for the individual or entity to which it is
addressed and may contain information that is privileged, confidential and
exempt from disclosure under applicable law. If you are not the intended
recipient, or the employee or agent responsible for delivering the message
to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination,
distribution or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited, and
you are requested to please notify me immediately by telephone or email, and
delete this message forthwith. Thank you for your cooperation.

...using silica desiccant packets with their antique quilts? If there is a
hint of humidity in the air, an antique textile will absorb it. Tucking a
silica packets in a box, bag or pillowcase with a quilt might be a good
preventative measure. I would appreciate your thoughts. ...







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Subject: Re: Silica desiccant packets
From: "Dr. Elizabeth A Richards" <elizabeth.richardsualberta.ca>
Date: Mon, 30 Sep 2013 09:44:12 -0600
X-Message-Number: 4

Dear Sue,

The Canadian Conservation Institute has a bulletin on the use of silica
gel. Anyone can get the bulletins on line. Go though Google or another
search engine to find the site for CCI.

When you use silica gel correctly you have to take into account the
storage space, i.e. volume of the space and the mass of the material,
i.e. weight of the quilt, you want to have at constant humidity. You
need an air tight space for the silica gel to work well. It's not as
easy to do as one might expect. You can dry out the silica gel in an
oven to get it to the humidity you want to prepare it for the storage
space. If I remember correctly in the Bulletin there is an example of
how to do the calculations. I do remember for mould to grow the
temperature has to be 65 degrees F or higher and the humidity at least 65%.

I'm sorry I'm not in Edmonton right now where my conservation references
are or I could be of more help. I have some of my quilts stored in
museum acid free boxes and others in polypropylene (5 recycling symbol
on the bottom) storage containers because the acid free boxes are so
expensive. I don't have problems with humidity as Edmonton is on the
Canadian prairies and is relatively dry.

Elizabeth Richards who is in the Eastern Townships in Quebec province
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Subject: RE: Silica desiccant packets
From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net>
Date: Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:48:21 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

I read somewhere to throw them into my container of safety pins that I use
for basting quilts. Living in MN...we do have humidity. I have no idea if
they are doing any good because I buy pins that are supposedly rust proof
but rather than throw them away I did that. If it has to be 'air-tight' etc.
I suspect I can just toss them.
jean



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Subject: Valerie White Quilts
From: Jo Major Ciolino <joanniemajgmail.com>
Date: Mon, 30 Sep 2013 14:59:21 -0400
X-Message-Number: 6

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My latest Q&A with my favorite quilt artists is up today. Valerie White has
always amazed me with her vibrant use of color (I'm a coward) and frankly,
I could stare at these "Roots" quilts all day. They are hypnotic, spiritual
and so beautiful!
http://www.whyquiltsmatter.org/welcome/discussion-guide-qa-with/why-quilts-matter-question-and-answer-with-valerie-white/

--047d7b8747ca1f73ae04e79e6f61--


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Subject: Blog Address
From: Karen Musgrave <karenmusgravesbcglobal.net>



I try to look at the bright side. When I posted about the literary
festival in North Carolina, I left off the s in my blog address. That's
what I get for doing something when I am dead tired. It did, however,
allow me to make some new connections and I appreciate everyone who
called my mistake to my attention. So if you're still interested, here
is the correct address-http://connectionsbykaren.blogspot.com. I got a
wonderful email today from the moderator of the panel discussion. It
seems I was considered the "lively" one on the panel and the one who
shared the best stories. I'll take it!

With gratitude,
Karen S. Musgrave





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Subject: RE: humidity dontrol
From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>
Date: Mon, 30 Sep 2013 19:26:59 -0700
X-Message-Number: 8

Speaking of humidity control, what is the ideal humidity in a 23x23 quilt
storage space. This is a one year old building, well insulated, off the
ground with a air convection heater that I am keeping at 62 degrees until I
hear otherwise. Advise is appreciated.

Karen Alexander in the Islands