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Subject: RE: humidity dontrol From: Judy Schwender <sister3603@yahoo.com>

Recommended Rh (relative humidity) for textile storage is under 50% or - 5% and temperature of 70 degrees F+ or - 5 degrees F. Good air circ ulation is important.Constant temperature and humidity is importan t. That way you don't have cycling, with fluctuating climate.Spike s in Rhand temp cause fibers to lose their resiliency.Sounds li ke what you have is actually pretty good. You could increase the tempera ture to 65 and be fine. Remember, colder storage is OK, but then when yo u bring the textile out of storage you could have condensation, especially where you live (it's so humid there). And that would not be good. Judy SchwenderFrom:

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Subject: RE: humidity dontrol From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Tue, 1 Oct 2013 15:37:00 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Odd note, but this is about how we keep or gut strung musical intruments, lutes and harps, as well as other assorted strung instruments! Guess being organic, they would react like textiles, although I never heard a quilt"snap a string" during a thunderstorm! An amazing sound, especially if it is a bass string!

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Subject: Mid-Atlantic quilt Study Group met 9/24/13 From: <judy.growcomcast.net> MAQSG 9/24/13 (94 photos)

Mid-Atlantic Quilt Study Group met in September. 94 photos taken at our meeting are posted on our Facebook page.

Thanks to those who helped out by sending me photos after I lost mine on the way from the camera to the computer. in Flemington.

Judy Grow

https://www.facebook.com/pages/MId-Atlantic-Quilt-Study-Group/24659651213 9995

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Subject: Att: Midwesterners - Has anyone ever seen this quilt? From: suereichcharter.net

Decatur Review Decatur, Illinois July 2, 1918 93 Page 9 RAMSEY SALE IS BIG SUCCESS Red Cross Quilt Brings $275. Ramsey, June 7The Red Cross quilt sold at Ramsey Thursday brought in nearly $275 for the Red Cross. This quilt had been made by the Red Cross women, and it was of unusual interest. It contained the president signature, the governor signature besides the names of about 1,000 people, including those of the soldier boys from that place. Tickets had been sold and the quilt went to the holder of the lucky number 140. The block with the president signa- ture was recently on display in The Review window.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut web sites: suereichquilts.com go to http://tinyurl.com/7ustpd8 www.coveringquilthistory go to http://tinyurl.com/878berh www.majorreichaward go to http://tinyurl.com/6wc66p5

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Subject: Has anyone from MOKA seenn this quilt? From: suereichcharter.net

Fayetteville Democrat Fayetteville, Arkansas July 17, 1918 93 Page 6 BROUGH CONTRIBUTES TO PERSHING QUILT LITTLE ROCK, July 17Governor Brough yesterday contributed to the Pershing Quilt which is to be pre- sented to Gen. Pershing with the re- quest that he allow the proceeds from the contributions to be used by the convalescent patients among our sol- dier boys in France. Every govern- or in the Union has been asked to take a square in the quilt, giving his state and the state he represents. President Wilson, ex-president Taft, ex-president, Roosevelt and Mrs. Gresham Dodd, the first. American mother to sacrifice her boy in the European war, will have their names embroidered on the quilt.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut web sites: suereichquilts.com go to http://tinyurl.com/7ustpd8 www.coveringquilthistory go to http://tinyurl.com/878berh www.majorreichaward go to http://tinyurl.com/6wc66p5

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Subject: Re: Att: Midwesterners - Has anyone ever seen this quilt? From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Thu, 3 Oct 2013 16:41:26 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 3

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p.s. I marvel at your research ability and great discoveries. I hope you un earth those quilts you just posted about.C2Laura Fisher atFISH ER HERITAGE305 East 61st Street5th floorNew York, NY ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: link to book From: erwerner3104yahoo.com

Barbara,I thought I had answered this email, but the "reply sent" icon isn't there. So, pardon me if this is a repeat. I'd be happy to sign the book if we are ever in the same place, or if you want to mail it to me at 3136 Millersburg Blvd E, Dundas MN. Are you a member of the Iowa-Illinois Quilt Study Group? I usually make their meetings. The other option would be to buy a book from me (14.99 + 2.92 postage) and I'll send you a signed copy. You could use the other copy as a gift. Let me know what works. Rosie ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: link to book From: Barbara Burnham <barbaraburnhamyahoo.com> Content-Type: text/plain; charsetus-ascii

Thanks Rose, I did purchase your book on amazon; was not sure how to purchase on the link you send. It arrived day before yesterday, and I flipped quickly through it. So glad to have this reference. Of all the state bird patterns I've collected, there is one I could never identify, but it is not in your book either. If I can get some free time during this furlough, I'll send you a photo or two. (DH keeps adding to the honey do list.) Maybe someday our paths will cross. Barbara M. Burnham

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Subject: Cheddar & Red Quilt Exhibit From: Patricia Lyons <patricialyonscableone.net> Date: Wed, 09 Oct 2013 19:05:59 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

FYI for those of you on the East Coast: > http://www.rosemont.edu/calendars/item/index.aspx?linkid1983&moduleid27

I can't believe my alma mater would do this to me: I head to the Mid-Atlantic region on October 17th!

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Subject: RE: qhl digest: October 08, 2013 From: gailkesslerhotmail.com

Hi Everyone - I'm looking for someone who has knowledge regarding the history of the Double Wedding Ring pattern and perhaps some pictures of favorite DWR quilts to share. Please contact me privately gailkessler11gmail.com Thanks!! Gail Kessler www.ladyfingerssewing.com

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Subject: RE: qhl digest: October 08, 2013 From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>

Dr Robert Bishop when head of the American Folk Art Museum wrote a book cal led the Romance of the Double Wedding Ring Quilt, you'll probably find a go od amount of info you need in there.Laura Fisher atFISHER HE RITAGE305 East 61st Street5th floorNew York, NY 10065t el: 212/ 838-2596;cell:917/ 797-1260web: www.laurafisherquilts. comemail: fisherheritageyahoo.comfacebook: Laura Fisher Quilts On Friday, October 11, 2013 10:32 AM, Gail Kessler <gailkesslerhotma il.com> wrote: Hi Everyone ->I'm looking for someone who has knowl edge regarding the history of the Double Wedding Ring pattern, and perhaps some pictures of favorite DWR quilts to share. Please contact me privately gailkessler11gmail.com>Thanks!!>Gail Kessler>www.ladyfingerssewin

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Subject: Genealogy Site you may not know about From: Mary Persyn <mary.persynvalpo.edu>

I've used this site a little bit. I'm not sure how well known it is, but I have found the information they have to be free. They are now offering a pay version also which gives easier search ability.

I thought those of you who dig around in the genealogy area might find it of interest if you didn't know about it.

Something to add to ancestry.com.

http://us7.campaign-archive2.com/?u952c099c101b4a6eb04bdc42a&id5c4d47bcc8&ea1397f0808

Mary

-- Mary G. Persyn Associate Professor of Law Emerita Valparaiso University Law School Valparaiso, IN 46383

mary.persynvalpo.edu

--047d7bdc9a5c6125da04e879f0de--

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Subject: Double Wedding Ring From: "Janet O'Dell" <janet6139gmail.com> Date: Sat, 12 Oct 2013 08:08:32 +1100 X-Message-Number: 4

This is most opportune as I had a query this morning - has anyone come across a DWR where the rings are appliquE9d?

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia

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Subject: Re: Double Wedding Ring From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Fri, 11 Oct 2013 18:55:14 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Janet wrote -- .....has anyone come across a DWR where the rings are appliquéd?

Yes, Janet. I've seen the rings appliqued onto one large sheet of fabric, and appliqued onto one block, and onto a set of blocks which were joined into a top.

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: Re: Double Wedding Ring From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Fri, 11 Oct 2013 19:53:04 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Janet, some American DWR kit quilts called for applique, including those from Virginia Snow Studios in Elgin, Illinois. The maker got stamped fabric blocks, with the outlines l and suggested sizes of the pieces to form each ring printed on the fabric in blue. The colored fabric for making the design was not included!

Xenia

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Subject: Re: Double Wedding Ring From: "Marcia's Mail" <marciarkearthlink.net> Date: Fri, 11 Oct 2013 18:42:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

I have seen appliqued wedding rings as well. Marcia Kaylakie, Austin, TX

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Subject: Re: Double Wedding Ring From: Julie Silber <silber.julieellengmail.com>

Yes, Barb,

I have a weird (of course!) appliqued Double Wedding Ring.

Very small scale, great border. I will try to post on the eBoard, if I can find the photos.

JS

Julie Silber

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Subject: Re: Double Wedding Ring From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com> Date: Fri, 11 Oct 2013 19:59:15 -0700 X-Message-Number: 9

I held a swap of circles to be appliqued for DWR quilts in 2007. See some samples at: http://www.winnowing.com/circle.html

Janet wrote -- .....has anyone come across a DWR where the rings are appliquéd?

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Subject: Re: Double Wedding Ring From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Fri, 11 Oct 2013 21:32:56 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Very clever, Christine. I had not seen such circles before.

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Syncronicity-design similarities From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>

Two design streams converged yesterday while browsing; first stream came as a result of browsing of old family photos from 1950s; 2nd stream emerged while on a new fabric website I had not explored before. A blog post was born.

http://karenquilt.blogspot.com/2013/10/old-connections-wallpaper-and-fabric. html

Enjoy,

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: Double Wedding Ring appliqued From: Pepper Cory <pepcoryclis.com>

Didn't Ruby McKim suggest in her 101 Patchwork Patterns that her DWR be appliqued? That was published the same year (or maybe one year earlier)than the Moutain Mist pattern. McKim's DWR makes real circles but the MM one has the slightly flattened circles with true squares at the intersection. The MM one became the most popular since it was drafted right and there was noguessing as to placement. Pepper i NC

-- Pepper Cory Teacher, author, designer, and quiltmaker 203 First Street Beaufort, NC 28516 (252) 726-4117

Website: www.peppercory.com and look me up on www.FindAQuiltTeacher.com

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Subject: Double wedding ring kit From: Virginia Berger <va_bergerhotmail.com>

I've uploaded pictures to the e-board of a vintage kit and contents that I purchased a while back. As you can tell the "rings" are one piece of fa bric rather than many pieces and the backing is marked to show you where to applique the parts.

Virginia Berger

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Subject: Burgoyne Surrounded From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>

Came across an interesting note: the pattern all (guess I can't really s ay that) of us call Burgoyne Surrounded may actually originally have been c alled Beauregard's Surroundings. I noted when looking at the pattern in Brackman that she attributes the name Burgoyne Surrounded to Household Maga zine, ca. 1930; and Beauregard's Surroundings to Ohio Farmer, ca. 1890. Does anyone out there have these publications that could let us know what they say regarding the pattern names?p.s. LAC lists it as #28 5 "An Odd Patchwork".thanks, and best, Don Beld ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: New England Regional Study Day From: Anita Loscalzo <aloscalzyahoo.com>

[Sorry if this duplicates another message]AQSG New England Regiona l DayWhen: Nov. 9, 2013Where: New England Quilt Museum, 18 Shattuc k St., Lowell, MATopic: Celebrating the Old and the NewLunch: On your own - enjoy one of the local restaurants or bring your own.Fees: $25.00 for AQSG Members, $35.00 for Non-MembersRegistration: 9:00-9:30am Our day will include a curator' s tour of the exhibit, "Roots of Modern Qui lting: Fresh Eyes on Old Quilts" , and a collection manager' s discussion o f The Dorothy Bosselman Collection of Miniature Amish quilts. The main focu s of the day will be a sharing session of members' quilts. Bring one of you r oldest quilts to share and discuss with the group.Maximum capacity for the day is 40 participants.To join us, please send us your name, address, email, phone number, and indicate whether you are an AQSG member a nd if you are a member of the New England Quilt Museum. The checks should b e made out to Laura Lane.Laura Lanec/o New England Quilt Museum 18 Shattuck StreetLowell, MA 01852Questions:Marge Farquharson mfarquharson dcds.netWe hope to see you then!Regional Repre sentatives - Anita Loscalzo, Pam Weeks, Marge Farquharson

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Subject: error in book From: erwerner3104yahoo.com

For those of you who purchased my book, STATE BIRD AND STATE FLOWER QUILTS on the CreateSpace site or on Amazon, there is a significant omission - no information on Missouri in Appendix 1 and Appendix 2. So here it is so you can print it off and put it in the book or write it in. In 1923 Missouri chose the hawthorne blossom of the tree commonly called "red haw" or "wild haw" as their state flower. In 1955 Missouri changed to the flowering dogwood.In 1927 Missouri chose the bluebird as their official state bird.

Rosie Werner ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Error in Book From: "Carol Berry" <cberryelite.net> Date: Tue, 15 Oct 2013 23:26:21 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Rose, I purchased your State Bird and State Flower Quilts book, which I have enjoyed reading. Thanks for the additional information. It has been printed off and I'll place the page in your book.

I was born and raised in Indiana (now living in California), and was surprised to learn that Indiana had several state flowers before finally settling on the peony, which I love. The cardinal has always been my favorite bird and it means a lot to me that it is the Indiana state bird.

Carol Berry

Subject: error in book From: erwerner3104yahoo.com Date: Sun, 13 Oct 2013 17:33:27 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 2

For those of you who purchased my book, STATE BIRD AND STATE FLOWER QUILTS on the CreateSpace site or on Amazon, there is a significant omission - no information on Missouri in Appendix 1 and Appendix 2. So here it is so you can print it off and put it in the book or write it in.

In 1923 Missouri chose the hawthorne blossom of the tree commonly called "red haw" or "wild haw" as their state flower. In 1955 Missouri changed to the flowering dogwood. In 1927 Missouri chose the bluebird as their official state bird.

Rosie Werner

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Subject: Re: Bennington From: YAK1953aol.com

Thanks for the tip. I ordered an issue of each of the Bennington's publications where the 2 articles were published. I just called the Bennington Museum, they charged my credit card and are sending the magazines soon. Yippee! Theresa Arnold Indianapolis

And thanks to the authors, Pam Weeks and the Bennington curator.

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Subject: Hagerstown, MD, Quilt Exhibit From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Thu, 17 Oct 2013 09:13:32 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

Good Morning All -

I have just learned of an upcoming exhibit at the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts, in Hagerstown, MD. I know nothing about the exhibit except what is mentioned in this listing. Scroll to the bottom of the page for information about the quilt exhibit from November 16 to April 13 --

http://www.wcmfa.org/exhibits.cfm

Looking forward to visiting, Barb in southeastern PA

ps -- please excuse the cross posting as I will be sending this to several lists.

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Subject: RE: Double Wedding Ring appliqued From: Stephanie Whitson Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com>

This delights me because if I were going to attempt a DWR I'd want to ap plique it in place.I enjoy applique and I'm not a very good piecer. This wo uld suit me beautifully.I love knowing that similar "stitch sisters" long a go felt the same way. I have a green and white crib quilt with a lovely diamond border created by appliqueing green diamonds in rows. No piecing.Noticing that was one of th e reasons I bought it ... because it made me smile and realize that "she wo uld have allowed me intoher quilting group." Ha. Stephanie Whitson

--_2bbd1330-6afc-4c41-a451-ceb0f7a6a244_--

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Subject: RE: Double Wedding Ring appliqued From: Vivien Sayre <vsayrenesa.com> Date: Thu, 17 Oct 2013 19:13:29 +0000 X-Message-Number: 3

Janet and all,

This weekend while I was appraising a show, I came across a DWR quilt that was slightly different. Subtly incorporated into two rings were pieces of c rocheted lace from a favorite grandmother's handkerchief and a piece of wed ding dress from the gown of the new owner's sister. The remainder of the qu ilt was traditional in nature and, if not told, the additions could have be en missed.

Vivien in MA

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Subject: RE: Double Wedding Ring appliqued From: "Janet O'Dell" <janet6139gmail.com> Date: Fri, 18 Oct 2013 08:27:09 +1100 X-Message-Number: 4

Many thanks to list members for the information about appliquE9d DWR quilts. An example is winging its way to me from the US ;-)

Recently here in Melbourne The Applique Guild of Australia www.theappliqueguildofaustralia.org.au was successfully launched and so this example will be duly examined.

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia

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Subject: RE: Double Wedding Ring appliqued From: Stephanie Whitson Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Fri, 18 Oct 2013 16:18:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

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We did that for my step-son. His Mom (my best friend) made her 1970s weddin g gown out of satin-ish polyester. I removed a bit of the inside of the hem (thankfully it had a wide hem) and we used it in a very modern design piec ed wedding quilt the bride and groom cherish. The rest is cotton but I w ashed the bit of the wedding gown to make sure it would hold up ... I actua lly think that fabric will outlast the cotton! Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: quilt auction From: erwerner3104yahoo.com Date: Fri, 18 Oct 2013 19:40:17 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 1

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In case anyone is interested:The School Sisters of Notre Dame are sponsoring a quilt auction, Women Hanging by a Thread, to raise funds for their work with needy women and their families struggling with poverty, violence, homelessness, or illiteracy.50 wonderful quilts will be auctioned on Saturday, Oct. 26 at 1:00 p.m. at St. Edward's Church in Bloomington MN. The quilts can be viewed on-line at http://www.faheysales.com/. On-line bidding has already started and on-line bidders can bid in real time during the live auction. Among the beautiful quilts is a Hmong quilt made by one of the groups that benefit from the auction and an applique quilt from Lancaster County PA. You can read about the work of the Sisters at http://www.ssndcentralpacific.org/. A very worthy cause! Rosie Werner ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt History Books for Sale From: Helene Kusnitz <helenekusnitzgmail.com> Date: Sun, 20 Oct 2013 17:56:12 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

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I am still downsizing my books. If you're interested in any of these please contact me off list. They are from a smoke free pet, free home. Shipping, confirmation and insurance are extra. I'll accept money order or personal check (will wait for it to clear). Please send me your zip code for shipping costs, only US mailing. Thanks, Helene Kusnitz helenekusnitzgmail.com

Fabric of Society- A Century of People and their Clothes 1770-1870 by Jane Tozer and Sarah Levitt, a Laura Ashley Publication. Hard bound. $5

What92s American about American Quilts A research Forum on Regional Characteristics, Proceedings March 18 and 19 1995 Sponsored by the Smithsonium. Spiral bound, paper. $5

Mosaic Quilts -Paper Template Piecing in the South Carolina Lowcountry. The Charleston Museum, paperback $15

Patchwork by Averil Colby, paperback. 1982. $5

The Belles of New England by William Moran. Hardback. $10

For Purpose and Pleasure by Sandi Fox 1995. Paper back. $15.

Quilting Traditions by Patricia Herr $15

Quilts-The Fabric of Friendship The York county Quilt Documentation Project and the York County Heritage Trust. $15

Treasures in the Trunk by Mary Bywater Cross 1993 paperback $10

Quilts and the Women of the Mormon Migrations by Cross 1996 paperback $10

Chintz Applique from Imitation to Icon by Carolyn Ducy 2008 paperback $10

Chintz Quilts Unfading Glory by Bullard and Shiell 1983 paperback $15

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Subject: Quilt History books sold From: Helene Kusnitz <helenekusnitzgmail.com> Date: Mon, 21 Oct 2013 06:44:51 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

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Thank you to all who inquired. Helene Kusnitz

-- Helene Kusnitz helenekusnitz.com

--089e0111c09a4674bd04e93df937--

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Subject: I need help finding an old magazine date From: "Kathy Moore" <kmoore81austin.rr.com> Date: Mon, 21 Oct 2013 21:38:37 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

This is a multipart message in MIME format.

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I need help finding a date for an old issue of Quilting Today magazine. Can any of you tell me if there is an index accessible by the internet?

Thanks,

Kathy Moore

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Subject: New England Quilt Museum Library From: Pam Weeks <curatornequiltmuseum.org> Date: Tue, 22 Oct 2013 08:14:29 -0400 X-Message-Number: 1

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Hi all, THe library at the New England Quilt Museum is a wonderful resource for anything quilt related. Folks inquire about a wide range of things, from patterns to research topics. Members can borrow just about anything as long as we have two copies, and members can receive their loans by mail. Just wanted to make sure you all know about this wonderful resource.

Pam

Pamela Weeks Binney Family Curator New England Quilt Museum 603.661.2245 (cell is always best!)

www.nequiltmuseum.org

--047d7bb0435cb0067604e953578d--

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Subject: New York Beauties and Tech From: Jo Major Ciolino <joanniemajgmail.com> Date: Tue, 22 Oct 2013 12:22:04 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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Bill Volckening's collection of New York Beauty quilts is eye candy personified! His thoughts on how technology are well worth a read - and for cat lovers, well..... http://www.whyquiltsmatter.org/welcome/discussion-guide-qa-with/quilts-matter-question-answer-bill-volckening/

Give it a look! Joan

--001a1132e5201a2a2904e956cd67--

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Subject: List of textile museums for a fiction book From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com> Date: Wed, 23 Oct 2013 12:39:53 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

I want to help a favorite author assemble a list of textile museums in the United States.

The author, Monica Ferris, posted on a blog -- Killer Hobbies -- that she and her agent want the books' heroine to visit a textile museum. The series features a needlework store owner named Betsy Devonshire.

Here is what Ferris said in her post: "In this note my fan suggested I send Betsy to a textile museum. My agent leaped on this idea and asked me about it. I told her I’d thought about sending Betsy on a bus tour of England, visiting textile museums, but my editor doesn’t like Betsy leaving town, much less the country. But my agent loves the idea of a textile museum. . ."

Betsy's fictional needlework store is located in Excelsior, MN. I love the mystery series. I've read them all. The first book is called Crewel World.

So, if members of this list can supply the names and locations of textile museums it would be a great help. I can send them on to Ms. Ferris (or you can visit her web pages and/or the Killer Hobbies blog and give her some direction). The author is accurate when she describes needlework techniques. She is not a quilter, but a few quilts have appeared in her books.

Thanks,

Christine Thresh on an Island in the California Delta http://www.winnowing.com/ <--- quilting http://winnowings.blogspot.com/ <--- blog http://www.threshpublications.com/ <--- fibers

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Subject: RE: List of textile museums for a fiction book From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Wed, 23 Oct 2013 16:41:17 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

The Textile Museum of Canada is located in Toronto. That's not too far for fictional Betsy to travel from Minnesota. It has a good collection which includes the native peoples of Canada. The galleries there aren't large but there are several, on more than one floor of the building. The gift shop is wonderful, varied and exciting.

Toronto has the advantage of being North American and foreign at the same time. They speak English there, but plenty of other languages can be heard, if desired! And. . .side trips to the Royal Ontario Museum and the Bata Shoe Museum are easy via subway.

Monica could visit there to get background for a fictional museum.

In Minneapolis there is a textile section at the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, and of course, the Textile Center of Minnesota, which is not a museum, but does have an exhibit gallery, library and gift shop.

https://www.textilemuseum.ca/ http://www.textilecentermn.org/ http://new.artsmia.org/

Kim -----Original Message----- From: Christine Thresh [mailto:christinewinnowing.com] Sent: Wednesday, October 23, 2013 2:40 PM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] List of textile museums for a fiction book

I want to help a favorite author assemble a list of textile museums in the United States.

The author, Monica Ferris, posted on a blog -- Killer Hobbies -- that she and her agent want the books' heroine to visit a textile museum. The series features a needlework store owner named Betsy Devonshire.

Here is what Ferris said in her post: "In this note my fan suggested I send Betsy to a textile museum. My agent leaped on this idea and asked me about it. I told her I99d thought about sending Betsy on a bus tour of England, visiting textile museums, but my editor doesn99t like Betsy leaving town, much less the country. But my agent loves the idea of a textile museum. . ."

Betsy's fictional needlework store is located in Excelsior, MN. I love the mystery series. I've read them all. The first book is called Crewel World.

So, if members of this list can supply the names and locations of textile museums it would be a great help. I can send them on to Ms. Ferris (or you can visit her web pages and/or the Killer Hobbies blog and give her some direction). The author is accurate when she describes needlework techniques. She is not a quilter, but a few quilts have appeared in her books.

Thanks,

Christine Thresh on an Island in the California Delta

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Subject: Marghab linen collection in South Dakota From: "Mary Waller" <mwallervyn.midco.net> Date: Thu, 24 Oct 2013 07:36:25 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

The South Dakota Art Museum holds the Marghab linen collection. The Museum is on the campus of South Dakota State University, in Brookings. That's about a five-hour drive from Minneapolis, MN.

Here's the description from their website, "The Museum has the largest, most comprehensive collection of Marghab Linens in the world. This collection is one of the founding collections of the museum. The linens were produced on the Island of Madeira from 1932-1978 by native embroidresses employed by Marghab Ltd. South Dakota native Vera Way Marghab and her husband Emile established the company in 1932. After his death in 1947, Vera continued to supervise the linen design and operation of the company for nearly 30 years. The Collection was given to the Museum by Vera Way Marghab in 1970 with subsequent additions to the collection over the next 26 years. The linen collection serves to illustrate the creative and determined spirit of South Dakota people." From: http://www.sdstate.edu/southdakotaartmuseum/collections/Marghab/index.cfm

Mary Waller Vermillion, South Dakota, USA

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Subject: MN Textile Museum From: linda laird <clproductsgmail.com> Date: Thu, 24 Oct 2013 07:39:37 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

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Perhaps Betsy visits this museum in Minneapolis and then studies www.HmongEmbroidery.org, the first virtual Hmong textile museum. She'll learn about the most meticulous stitching I know of and gain an understanding of these fascinating immigrants.

HMONG CULTURAL CENTER 995 University Avenue West-Suite 214 (Chatsworth and University Avenue (1 1/2 blocks east of Lexington) in Sunrise Market Building), Saint Paul, MN 55104-4796 (USA). View a map of our location in St. Paul, MN.

Phone: (651) 917-9937 (Office) Fax: (651) 917-9978

Executive Director: Txongpao Lee

E-Mail: txonghmongcc.org

Linda Laird

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Subject: Re: List of textile museums for a fiction book From: Sally Ward <sallytattersfastmail.co.uk> Date: Thu, 24 Oct 2013 17:08:06 +0100 X-Message-Number: 3

Christine, I had to smile. If she wanted a bus (as in Miss Marple type public bus) tour of England I think she would also need a time machine back to the 50s!

Sally Ward

> sending Betsy on a bus tour of England, visiting textile museums,

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Subject: Fwd: News from Quilts of Valor Foundation - Requests for QOV's From: textiqueaol.com Date: Thu, 24 Oct 2013 14:26:51 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 4

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0909

Quilts of Valor Foundation

2013

0909 09

To the Quilts of Valor Community of Volunteers,

We need your help! The QOVF story on NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams M onday evening has brought impressive national attention, new Facebook frien ds, website visitors, interested volunteers, many new groups registered AND over 251 requests for Quilts of Valor since the broadcast.

Each month we have standing requests for over 240 quilts from medical facil ities in Afghanistan and Germany, as well as stateside programs working wit h both active military and veterans. With the additional 251 requests, we a re short of Quilts of Valor needed for presentations in the next couple of months. If you have a quilt under way, please get it finished and get it to your State Coordinator or to our Destinations Coordinator. If you have not started your next Quilt of Valor, would you try to get another one complet ed and to the long armer before the holiday season is upon us?

Here a just a few of the comments that we have received with the requests f or our comforting and healing Quilts of Valor.

--This request is for my dad. He has Type 2 Diabetes from Agent Orange, and has been sick for several months. Out of six boys in his family five of th em served in the military. Thank you for all that you ladies are doing.

--My father served in the 93rd evac hospital in Saigon (1964-1965). He is a n anesthetist (RN) and spent day after day in the operating room helping pa tch up the injured men. He's never received any kind of honor or award for his service. This would be the perfect recognition.

--Yvonne was an Army surgical nurse stationed in harm's way in each deploym ent. Severely wounded In January 2010 by a mortar that blew up outside her tent, she has been struggling to recover fr om nerve damage, TBI, and PTSD. She deserves a Quilt of Valor more than any one I know. Please consider her as a recipient.

--My husband was severely injured while serving in Vietnam. He still has hi s Purple Heart, tattered as it is, hanging from his rear view mirror. When he saw the news about your quilts, he commented, "I would love to have one. " This is the first thing he has asked for in 43 years.

--Spent 8 months in Afghanistan last year working as aircrew. Will be deplo ying again in a few months during the winter. Having a quilt from you would be an honor. If it's not I understand. My roommate had a quilt that had be en given to him through QOVF and has had me interested ever since.

--I was wounded on Nov.5, 1969. After several weeks of surgery in Vietnam a nd Japan, I recuperated enough to be shipped back to the U.S.A. I arrived a t St. Albans Naval Hospital in New York on a freezing winter day. We were t ransferred to an unheated school bus dressed only in our hospital pajamas a nd a thin robe. I could have used one of your quilts to ease my shivering a s we rode for an hour before arriving at he hospital. Tears came to my eyes when I heard about Quilts of Valor on the nightly news.

Thank you so much for showing our troops someone cares.

Thank you for all you have done and thank you in advance for helping us hon or these men and women who have given so much for us.

Susan Gordon, Executive Director

Have YOU Read the QOVF BLOG Lately?

New Stories On the Blog

A Day to Remember

Take A Moment

We Are On FACEBOOK and are many of you..

LIKE our Facebook Page

Share your stories and photos on our Facebook Page

Stay CONNECTED

CONNECT WITH US

CONTACT US

Phone: (916) 776-6219

Email Address: infoQOVF.org

Please do NOT mail quilts/QOVs to this address. If you need a destination, fill out destination form. Mailing Address: Quilts of Valor Foundation P.O. Box 728 Lebanon, NH 03766

Website

09

Contact Information

Sincerely,

Susan Gordon Executive Director Quilts of Valor Foundation susan.gordonqovf.org

Thank you for putting service above self. Your efforts make a difference.

0909

Forward this email

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Subject: Re: List of textile museums for a fiction book From: Arden Shelton <junkoramacomcast.net> Date: Thu, 24 Oct 2013 11:38:03 -0700 (PDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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We have a nice textile museum here in Oregon, though I doubt Betsy would ge t this far:C2 http://latimerquiltandtextile.com/C2....arden (Ms) Arden Shelton Portland, OR>____________________________ ____> From: Christine Thresh <christinewinnowing.com>>To: Quilt Hist ory List <qhllyris.quiltropolis.com> >Sent: Wednesday, October 23, 2013 12:39 PM>Subject: [qhl] List of textile museums for a fiction book> >>I want to help a favorite author assemble a list of textile museums in the >United States.>>The author, Monica Ferris, posted on a bl og -- Killer Hobbies -- that she >and her agent want the books' heroine to visit a textile museum. The series >features a needlework store owner named Betsy Devonshire.>>Here is what Ferris said in her post:C2 "In this note my fan suggested I send >Betsy to a textile museum.C2 My agent leaped on this idea and asked me about >it.C2 I told her I 99d thought about sending Betsy on a bus tour of England, >visiti ng textile museums, but my editor doesn99t like Betsy leaving town, >much less the country.C2 But my agent loves the idea of a textile m useum. . >.">>Betsy's fictional needlework store is located in Exc elsior, MN. I love the >mystery series. I've read them all. The first bo ok is called Crewel World.>>So, if members of this list can supply th e names and locations of textile >museums it would be a great help. I ca n send them on to Ms. Ferris (or you >can visit her web pages and/or the Killer Hobbies blog and give her some >direction). The author is accura te when she describes needlework techniques. >She is not a quilter, but a few quilts have appeared in her books.>>Thanks,>>Christine Th resh>on an Island in the California Delta>http://www.winnowing.com/ < --- quilting>http://winnowings.blogspot.com/ <--- blog>http://www.thr eshpublications.com/ <--- fibers>>>>>>--->You are curr ently subscribed to qhl as: junkoramacomcast.net.>To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1813068Slyris.quiltropolis.com>>> --547783885-1069624362-1382639883:18241--

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Subject: Textile museums From: vfreudenthalyahoo.com Date: Wed, 23 Oct 2013 17:30:45 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

Kristine, in Oregon we have the Latimer Quilt and Textile Center in Tillamook.

Velma Freudenthal Newport, OR

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 23, 2013 From: <gebelearthlink.net> Date: Thu, 24 Oct 2013 17:32:16 -0700 X-Message-Number: 7

Cedarburg, WI, has te Wisconsin Museum of Quilts and Fiber Arts.

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Subject: Textile Museum From: "Carol Berry" <cberryelite.net> Date: Fri, 25 Oct 2013 07:41:00 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

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The San Jose Museum of Quilts & Textiles is the oldest quilt museum in the country, 36 years old. We do 4 major exhibitions a year with our fiber space exhibition changing more frequently. We have an on-going fiber talk series featuring regional fiber and quilt artists. We also offer classes, a community gallery where people can sit and make art either to take home or to display in the gallery, and other activities. The museum has a permanent collection of 850 objects; one of my favorites is a hexagon quilt made by the wife of Francis Scott Key. She formed the hexagons over shapes cut from his letters.

More information can be found at www.sjquiltmuseum.org <http://www.sjquiltmuseum.org/> .

The above synopsis was sent to me by Marie Strait of the San Jose Museum of Quilts and Textiles, which is located in San Jose, CA.

Carol Berry

Merced, CA

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Subject: List of Textile Museums From: Laura Lane <collectionsnequiltmuseum.org> Date: Fri, 25 Oct 2013 10:09:40 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

Christine,

Consider the "Textile City" of Lowell, Massachusetts! Not only do we have the American Textile History Museum (www.athm.org) and the New England Quilt Museum (www.nequiltmuseum.org), we also have the Lowell National Park (http://www.nps.gov/lowe/index.htm) which preserves and interprets the history of textile manufacturing in Lowell and other New England towns.

Laura Lane

-- Laura P. Lane Collections Manager New England Quilt Museum collectionsNEQuiltMuseum.org 978-452-4207 Ext.11

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Subject: Textile Museum From: glslagcox.net Date: Fri, 25 Oct 2013 13:45:18 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

I just went to the Textile Museum in Lowell MA. The New England Quilt Museum is a few blocks away. I enjoyed the textile museum. The museum seems like it would be a good location as the mill exhibits are nearby, too. The museum is organized historically.

There is also suppose to be a quilt museum in Oregon. I haven't been there, but might go w/ the Traveling Quilters next summer.

http://latimerquiltandtextile.com/

Sounds like it will be a fun book to read. cheers Gale

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Subject: New terminology for me-Picot binding on quilt From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Sat, 26 Oct 2013 13:25:10 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

I saw a reference in the 1999 book "Magnificent Harvest: Quilts from the Heart" today using the term "picot" for a binding I have always known as "prairie points'. Have any of you seen the interchange of these two terms as well? It's a first for me. Or maybe I have just read it before unconsciously in other books and didn't question it. But I had to stop and look up the term to see what others meant by it within "general" textile use. I found the most references to knitting as well as what I would call "lace edging" but very few references to it in conjunction with quilts. Maybe it is a regionalized usage of the term within quilting?

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Re: New terminology for me-Picot binding on quilt From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Sat, 26 Oct 2013 16:57:35 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Just musing, but if "picotage" refers to a dotted design on chintz ground, made with the tips of nails driven into a print plate, maybe "picot " means point? (origin 17th century from the French: a small peak or point, diminutive of pic)

But is this a case of making a common term more elegant, like "broderie perse"?

Xenia, playing devil's advocate -

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Subject: Re: New terminology for me-Picot binding on quilt From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Sat, 26 Oct 2013 14:31:18 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

<Just musing, but if "picotage" refers to a dotted design on chintz ground, made with the tips of nails driven into a print plate, maybe "picot " means point? (origin 17th century from the French: a small peak or point, diminutive of pic)>

This makes a lot of sense, Xenia.

Karen A.

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Subject: 1851 quilt and article mentioning Carol Poitras From: textiqueaol.com Date: Sat, 26 Oct 2013 20:41:20 -0400 (EDT) X-Message-Number: 5

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Great story....

http://www.reformer.com/localnews/ci_24391388/cloaked-mystery-quilt-gifted- intriguing-spofford-man-1851

Jan Thomas

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Subject: Picot From: linda laird <clproductsgmail.com> Date: Sat, 26 Oct 2013 22:30:33 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

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picot |CB88pC493kC58D| noun [often as adj. ] a small loop or series of small loops of twisted thread in lace or embroidery, typically decorating the border of a fabric. ORIGIN early 17th cent.: from French, literally 98small peak or point,99diminutive of pic.

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Subject: Re: New terminology for me-Picot binding on quil From: Ady Hirsch <adamroninetvision.net.il> Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2013 07:45:07 +0200 X-Message-Number: 2

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My guess would be it is derived from crochet, where it is used to describe a 'peaked' edging, reminiscent in function and look to prairie points:

http://www.woolcrafting.com/crochet-picot-edging.html

The term is commonly used in in Victorian crochet handbooks:

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/20776/20776-h/chapter_9.html

Best,

Ady in Israel

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Subject: Re: 1851 quilt and article mentioning Carol Poitras From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Sat, 26 Oct 2013 23:33:51 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

Wouldn't you love to see close-ups of the fabrics and sayings! Really fun story! Anyone on this list actually see the quilt?

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Re: [AQSG2] Re: what's in a name From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>

The most famous American who wore feathered plumes was Dolley Madison. It's strange that none of the names honored her and her unique style. She loved to wear turbans with a large ostrich feather stuck in them . She did this until her death in 1849. I have a ca. 1845 Star Spangled Banner quilt that has the blocks with their 760 pieces each, an ur n with tulips and vines border and Princess Feathers in the blank spots in the blocks. Quite a tour-de-force by the quilt maker. One of my home guilds and I are making a reproduction of it for an Opportunity quilt . best, Don Beld ________________________________ From: " most f amous American who wore feathered plumes was Dolley Madison.&nbsp; It's str ange that none of the names honored her and her unique style.&nbsp; She lov ed to wear <span id"misspell-0"><span>turbans with a large ostrich feath er stuck in them.&nbsp; She did this until her death in 1849.&nbsp; I have a ca. 1845 Star Spangled Banner quilt that has the blocks with their 760 pi eces each, an urn with tulips and vines border and Princess Feathers in the blank spots in the blocks.&nbsp; Quite a tour-de-force by the quilt maker. &nbsp; One of my home guilds and I are making a reproduction of it for an O pportunity quilt.&nbsp; best, Don

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Subject: Re: [AQSG2] Re: what's in a name From: quiltnsharroncharter.net

Donald will we be able to purchase tickets for this quilt repro?

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 713-594-6876 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

On Tue, Oct 29, 2013 at 10:28 AM, Donald Beld wrote:

"One of my home guilds and I are making a reproduction of it for an Opportunity quilt."

-

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Subject: the quilting columnists of the 20s & 30s From: "Peg Bingham" <peg.binghamyahoo.com> Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2013 16:23:15 -0400 X-Message-Number: 3

Question - during the 20s & 30s, were the quilting columns, eg. Kansas City Star, published internationally? How widely geographically were the columns published?

Any help/direction would be appreciated!

Peg

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Subject: Re: [AQSG2] Re: what's in a name From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net>

sure, but it won't be done for about six months. I have one of the four blocks done--it's a very simple template pattern; but lots of one inch tria ngles. We are doing it all by hand, using early 19th Century Reproductio ns--red, green and a little brown.I'll post when it is done. best, Do n ________________________________ From: "quiltnsharroncharter .net" <quiltnsharroncharter.net>To: Quilt History List <qhllyris.quilt ropolis.com> Sent: Tuesday, October 29, 2013 9:17 AMSubject: [qhl] Re : [AQSG2] Re: what's in a name Donald will we be able to purch ase tickets for this quilt repro?~~~~~~~~~~~Sharron K. Evanshtt p://www.treetopquilting.com/Phone: 713-594-6876Spring, TX~~~~~~ ~~~~~On Tue, Oct 29, 2013 at 10:28 AM, Donald Beld wrote:"On e of my home guilds and I are making a reproduction of it for an Opportunit y quilt."---You are currently subscribed to qhl as: donbeldpac bell.net.To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1870667Wlyris.q uiltropolis.com ---1576899772-571382516-1383069361:64992--

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Subject: Re: [AQSG2] Re: what's in a name From: quiltnsharroncharter.net

Great! Thank you.

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 713-594-6876 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

On Tue, Oct 29, 2013 at 12:56 PM, Donald Beld wrote:

> sure, but it won't be done for about six months. I have one of th e four blocks done--it's a very simple template pattern; but lots of one inch triangles. We are doing it all by hand, using early 19th Century

Reproductions--red, green and a little brown. I'll post when it is done. best, Don

________________________________

Sent: Tuesday, October 29, 2013 9:17 AM Subject: [qhl] Re: [AQSG2] Re: what's in a name

Donald will we be able to purchase tickets for this quilt repro?

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans

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Subject: Very exciting find - 1912 quilting machine From: suereichcharter.net

While researching for my WWI quilts book, I found this article from 1912 referencing a quilting machine. I have quilts from this time period with continuous line, machine quilting. To my knowledge, this is the earliest reference to a quilting machine. Very exciting.

Plaindealer Topeka, Kansas August 16, 1912, page 2

NEWTON, KANSAS The C.M.E. ladies of the sewing circle pieced a quilt and sent it to Wichita to a gentleman, who has a quilting machine, who did the quilt- ing free. The quilt was beautiful and to dispose of it the circle selected the following ladies to enter a contest to see who could raise the largest amount to receive the quilt: Mrs. G. C. Granbury 0; Mrs. C. Riley 15c; Mrs. A.J. Tandy 85c; Mrs. Wm. Slaughter $1.40; Mrs. U.S. Rickman.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut web sites: suereichquilts.com go to http://tinyurl.com/7ustpd8 www.coveringquilthistory go to http://tinyurl.com/878berh www.majorreichaward go to http://tinyurl.com/6wc66p5

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Subject: RE: Very exciting find - 1912 quilting machine From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Wed, 30 Oct 2013 09:46:18 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

That IS exciting. I have an interest in that too and have quite a few examples; one a bed quilt, the rest are cribs. I have done some half-hearted looking for photos showing the so called 'jig' that people talk about. Odd that there is not more info out there since once you are aware of this type of machine quilting you do see it quite often. Thanks for that reference. Esp. nice that it is dated. I'm talking at our study grp meeting Saturday on that period of quilt history. BTW, Material Culture, Barbara's blog, this week is interesting - about the styles of quilts that appear to be obvious use of factory cut left-overs. Jean

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Subject: National Museum of American History video - OT From: textiqueaol.com

Thought this might interest you all. Jan Thomas

National Museum of American History has uploaded Founding Fragments - Star- Spangled Souvenirs

Founding Fragments - Star-Spangled Souvenirs by National Museum of American History

The giant Star-Spangled Banner flag is one of our most popular artifacts, a nd a centerpiece of the Museum. Why then are pieces of it kept locked away in storage? Host Tory Altman talks with textile conservator Suzanne Thomass en-Krauss to find out. The "Founding Fragments" video series gets up close and personal with historical treasures in the collection of the National Mu seum of American History. Subscribe to our channel to learn about future ep isodes.

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Subject: Re: National Museum of American History video - OT From: textiqueaol.com Date: Wed, 30 Oct 2013 11:13:57 -0400 (EDT)

Sorry, it appears the video was stripped out. Try this link:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?vt5zfFDT-pNo&featureem-uploademail

Jan Thomas

National Museum of American History has uploaded Founding Fragments - Star-Spangled Souvenirs

Founding Fragments - Star-Spangled Souvenirs by National Museum of American History

The giant Star-Spangled Banner flag is one of our most popular artifacts, a nd a centerpiece of the Museum. Why then are pieces of it kept locked away in storage? Host Tory Altman talks with textile conservator Suzanne Thomassen-Krauss to find out. The "Founding Fragments" video series gets up

close and personal with historical treasures in the collection of the Natio nal Museum of American History. Subscribe to our channel to learn about future

episodes. You were sent this email because you chose to receive updates about new vid eos uploaded by National Museum of American History. If you don't want these up dates anymore, you can change your preferences by visiting the subscription manag er.

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Subject: RE: Very exciting find - 1912 quilting machine From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Wed, 30 Oct 2013 11:21:34 -0400 X-Message-Number: 5

Those interested in the history of quilting systems for home sewing machines might like to take a look at:

http://hartcottagequilts.com/his9.htm

There is a well-researched (with images) discussion of quilting with domestic machines available in the late 19th century. And Singer had a quilting foot and guide quite early, too.

Xenia

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Subject: Re: National Museum of American History video - OT From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Wed, 30 Oct 2013 11:36:43 -0400 X-Message-Number: 6

Back story: The flag that flew over Ft. McHenry was made by Mary Pickersgill, a widowed flag-maker from Baltimore. According to the Baltimore 1812 Bicentennial site, Pickersgill learned her craft from her mother, Philadelphian Rebecca Young, who made flags and standards for the Continental Army, the Pennsylvania Navy, and the First US Regiment during the Revolution.

Pickersgill was hired by the commander at Ft. McHenry, Major George Armistead, to make two flags. The larger flag, at 30 feet x 42 feet, was sewn by Mary, her daughter Caroline and a few others on the floor of a brewery, that being the only readily available indoor space large enough. The flag had 15 stripes and 15 stars, one for each existing state, and was made from 400 yards of English (!) wool bunting.

Pickersgill deserves more attention that Betsy Ross, but apparently lacked descendants intent on pointing out her place in American history!

Xenia

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Subject: Re: National Museum of American History video - OT From: textiqueaol.com

Thank you Xenia! This is why I love this group. There is always a way to tie history to the hard work of women. Seems Mary did have a rose named after her and what a beauty it is.

http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/l.php?l2.63762.0

Jan Thomas

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Subject: RE: Very exciting find - 1912 quilting machine From: Stephanie Whitson Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Wed, 30 Oct 2013 11:03:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 8

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Is the quilting design the one that is overall "swirls" ... is that what yo u ladies think this machine did?I've seen a lot of older quilts with that m achine quilting design over the face of the quilt and always wondered about it. Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Re: Top Teachers Club Lesson Plans From: Sheri Lesh <leshsherigmail.com>

I have a 3" stack of Top Teachers Club Lesson Plans for various books that were published by That Patchwork Place and Martingale Publishers. Before I dump them in the recycle bin....would anyone like them for the cost of shipping?

I would be glad to send them to the first one that responds to me PRIVATELY.

Sheri

-- Sheri R. Lesh leshsherigmail.com http://4andfifteen.blogspot.com/

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Subject: Re: the quilting columnists of the 20s & 30s From: erwerner3104yahoo.com

Arthur and Ruby McKim went to Europe in 1933. One of the purposes of their trip was to see if they could interest European newspapers in Ruby's syndicated series quilts. Whether they were successful or not, I do not know. It was on this same trip that they got interested in importing dolls, resulting in their Kimport Dolls business.Rosie Werner ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: early quilting machines From: Anita Loscalzo <aloscalzyahoo.com>

It depends on what they called "quilting machines" as to the earliest one. There is a quilting machine that was patented by J.J. Crall on August 7 , 1877 [patent 193,852] that had the machine move much as longarms of today . Other inventions were frames that did the moving, such as Clayton's of 1897.This information comes from:http://hartcottagequilts.com/his 9.htmAnita Loscalzo --700781406-305100707-1383249477:83871--

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: October 30, 2013 From: <gebelearthlink.net> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2013 14:17:05 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

The August/Sept 2012 Quilter's Newsletter (Magazine) had this notice from Aug/Sept 1871 reprinted: "1871, August 22 William John Tate was granted a patent by the U.S. Patent Office for an "improvement in Quilting Machines." Tate's industrial quilting machines used two parallel rows of needles with feeding devices that operated successively, not simultaneously. This innovaton allowed the machines to sew coinciding zigzag lines that created diamond-shaped patterns previously possible only by hand quilting."

Unfortunately, no reference source was provided but the existence of industrial quilting machines before 1871 is implied with the use of the word: improvement.

The Hart Cottage Quilts article provides many additional examples; seems a lot of improvements were required.

Carol Gebel

 

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Subject: A Quilter's Guide to Printed Fabric? From: "Sharron K. Evans" <quiltnsharroncharter.net> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2013 17:28:51 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

I just received my copy of Jeff Gutcheon's book. Regarding the photos of the swatches of fabric in the book: are they supposed to be in black and white? Just making sure my copy isn't just a photocopy of the real book.

Thanks for your help.

Warm regards, Sharron Evans Spring, TX ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: A Quilter's Guide to Printed Fabric? From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Thu, 31 Oct 2013 16:56:31 -0700 X-Message-Number: 6

> I just received my copy of Jeff Gutcheon's book. Regarding the photos of > the swatches of fabric in the book: are they supposed to be in black and > white? Just making sure my copy isn't just a photocopy of the real book.

Jeff Gutcheon's "A Quilter's Guide to Printed Fabric" is like a beginner's guide to understanding the process of printing cottons and is great at explaining textile production terms. But as I posted on AQSG, there are no color photos, unfortunately for it was self-published in 1990.

Karen Alexander