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Subject: Victorian Mourning & Quilt History From: Stephanie Whitson Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com>

Other than Uncoverings can anyone point me to a good resource to learn m ore? This is to give me background information for a lecture I'm preparing on Vi ctorian Mourning Customs.I just attended a "mourning event" at a historic m ansion in St. Louis and the topic has fascinated me for yearsso I'm goin g to add a lecture to my 2014 menu. I may even make "widow's weeds" ... we shall see. Thanks very much in advance for your insights. Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: RE: Victorian Mourning & Quilt History From: "Kathy Moore" <kmoore81austin.rr.com> Date: Fri, 1 Nov 2013 12:16:07 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Dahling, you'll look gorgeous in widow's weeds. Please send pictures!

Kath

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Subject: RE: Victorian Mourning & Quilt History From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com>

be sure to include info on mourning/memorial jewelry made of the deceased h air, as were hair pictures in shadow box frames. even without the deceased' s hair, there was plenty of memorial jewelry to honor the deceased and worn regularly.Laura Fisher's FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Stre et, New York NY 10065 cell: 917 /797-1260; ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Victorian Mourning From: Virginia Berger <va_bergerhotmail.com>

Not quilt related but I picked up a small book in Gettysburg PA called " Widow's Weeds and Weeping Veils: Mourning Rituals in 19th Century America" by Bernadette Loeffel-Atkins. Looks like it is self-published but seems to be well researched with a bibliography that might give you further leads. ISBN 978-1-57747-137-0 Virginia Berger

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Subject: Carol Ann Waugh From: Jo Major Ciolino <joanniemajgmail.com> Date: Sat, 2 Nov 2013 11:05:38 -0400 X-Message-Number: 2

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I never go to a quilt show without wondering what the judges were thinking when they decided on the award winners. I don't mean that in a snarky way, just in a "what criteria do they rank higher than others?" Sometimes you can tell by the award winners just what was highly prized - other times I am left in the dark. I know my own tastes and values of what I think makes a prize-winning entry have changed over the years, and I think anyone worth their salt (their fabric?) would grow in that direction.

I like what Carol Ann Waugh had to say on the topic: http://www.whyquiltsmatter.org/welcome/discussion-guide-qa-with/quilts-matter-question-answer-carol-ann-waugh/

Have any of you ever looked at an award winning quilt and your reaction was the opposite of that of the judges? Joan

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Subject: RE: Victorian Mourning & Quilt History From: Laura Lane <collectionsnequiltmuseum.org> Date: Tue, 05 Nov 2013 09:27:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

A recent post on Pam Buda's blog shows some great photos of Mourning Jewelry made from hair. Fascinating!

http://heartspunquilts.blogspot.com/

Laura Lane

Laura P. Lane Collections Manager New England Quilt Museum

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Subject: The Dressmaker From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Wed, 6 Nov 2013 12:47:25 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

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I have a 2nd edition, 1916 hardback copy of The Dressmaker by The Butterick Publishing Company book available.

If you are interested please email me privately at quiltsetccomcast.net for photos, condition and price info.

Jean

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Subject: selling quilts & how to From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com> Date: Wed, 6 Nov 2013 21:05:59 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

If you were going to sell some of your collection what do you folks think is the best way to do it? Ebay? Etsy? Personal webpage? This is for not perfect quilts, but quilts that would be great for teaching and learning. Thanks for your comments. I have many people who ask me this and I am also interested for some of my things. There are lots of folks out that who want to learn but don't have deep pockets. Lynn Lancaster Gorges, New Bern, NC (palamporeaol.com and llgorgesgmail.com)

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Subject: Selling NEWER quilts From: Jan Rodgers <rodgers.jtgmail.com> Date: Thu, 7 Nov 2013 09:14:24 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Through my work wearing many hats in the local quilt community around Pittsburgh, I see an issue looming on the horizon. As the senior members of our lively and active quilting community threads their last needles and completes their last quilts, there are going to be way more gorgeous quilts than even large extended families can accommodate in their hearts, beds, walls, and closets, maybe even in climate-controlled storage units in the case of the most prolific quilt makers!

They aren't "antique", they haven't become "vintage" yet, but they are beautiful and well-crafted and heartfelt . . . and numerous. It breaks my heart to say to a child of a recently deceased quilter, "Your mother's (or father's in one case) quilts are in very good condition and were very well made," but knowing they're just like 5,000 (or more) other quilts of that genre made in the 1980s or 1990s.

What outlets have you found across the country to help these families to de-accession the quilts of which they are less fond?? Ebay is one resource, for sure, but that can't be the only option. Please share any solutions that you may have found or created.

Jan Rodgers, the woman from Mars. (PA)

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Subject: Re: Selling NEWER quilts From: textiqueaol.com Date: Thu, 7 Nov 2013 13:22:14 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 2

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Jan,

I'd also suggest donating the quilts to organizations associated with the p arents' illnesses, hospices, hospital organizations, etc. - as fundraisers .

Jan Thomas

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Subject: RE: selling quilts & how to From: Stephanie Whitson Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Fri, 8 Nov 2013 15:07:37 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

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Lynn asked about selling some of her collection. I am contemplating doing t his as well and would be interested in advice. Ebay prices seem very depressed to me of late. Not the best environment for a seller. Great for buyers. Hard to know what to do frankly. Years ago I prepared a small list with photos and posted on this list that I was selling a few pieces and folks could e-mail me privately if intereste d. That found a lovely new home for a couple of quilts. My problem is I love all my stuff ... so I want it to have a good home. It' s like I'm seeking a home for a beloved pet. Steph Whitson

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Subject: RE: Selling NEWER quilts From: Stephanie Whitson Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Fri, 8 Nov 2013 15:13:14 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

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One wonderful quiltmaker in our church congregation donated a few of her pi eces to a silent auction a couple of years back. It provided money for a ca use she cared about and enabled her to downsize. Win-win. I suppose in an estate situation I would encourage people to do that. In the case of quilts that are well made but not "special" it seems to me that the estate might benefit more from writing off donation values than tr ying to sell the pieces. Offer wall hangings to family shelters pediatri c wards rescue missions the local quilt guild fundraiser assisted living facilities etc. Very small pieces could become "angel quilts" for preemies. Throw-size quilts would be welcomed by the wheel-chair bound (I would think). & so on. Steph Whitson

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Subject: selling/dispensing of quilts and such From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Sat, 09 Nov 2013 03:35:59 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

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I don't worry so much about how*I* could dispose of my quilts, but all my quiltmaking stuff is another matter. Also, if I don't get around to dealing with these matters in time, I'm sure my family won't have a clue how to go about it. Any ideas about these two issues?

Andi in Paducah

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Subject: Quilted accomplishments From: Xenia Cord <xenialegacyquilts.net> Date: Sat, 9 Nov 2013 08:43:23 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

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I haven't seen it mentioned here, but this year Ann Loveless of Michigan won "the world's largest monetary award" [$200K] for her "Sleeping Bear Dune Lakeshore" art quilt. The work was among more than 1500 multi-media entries from 47 countries and the US, in the 2013 Artprize competition underwritten by the Dick and Betsy DeVos Foundation in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Here's a description, and you can Google the title for an image:

<"Sleeping Bear Dune Lakeshore" is a landscape art quilt of the Lake Michigan shoreline. This large work consists of four individual panels depicting a beach scene which all connect into one large panoramic view. Working from a photograph Ann captures a beautiful Lake Michigan sunset, sparkling water, dune grass in the breeze, majestic birch trees with Sleeping Bear Dunes in the distance. The viewer is attracted and drawn into this art piece by the vivid color, warm textures and details of this favorite scene. Ann's collage technique incorporates traditional cotton and batik fabrics along with other fibers including linen, silk, yarns, polyester netting and angelina fiber for added texture. Techniques also include raw edge fusible applique and free-motion machine quilting.>

Ann deserves major congratulations from the quilt world, and aren't we all proud that a quilted piece of art is so highly regarded!

Xenia --Apple-Mail-3--177005333--

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Subject: Re: selling/dispensing of quilts and such From: michele mclaughlin <mickiemclaug58yahoo.com> Date: Sat, 9 Nov 2013 05:38:00 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 3

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One of my guilds has already dealt with this. Families have donated stas h to the guild to sell at our quilt show (not sure if the money was donated to the guild or to a non-profit of the family's choice). Our guild allo ws people to sell their own wares as part of the show. I do know that w hen we sold fabric at the show, we made a ton more money.Hope t hat helps,Michele in chilly PennsylvaniaOn Saturday, Novembe r 9, 2013 4:36 AM, Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> wrote: I don't wor ry so much about how*I* could dispose of my quilts, but allmy quiltma king stuff is another matter. Also, if I don't get around todealing with these matters in time, I'm sure my family won't have a cluehow to go ab out it. Any ideas about these two issues?Andi in Paducah- --You are currently subscribed to qhl as: mickiemclaug58yahoo.com.To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1839470Slyris.quiltropolis.co m --1379625891-848098636-1384004280:63413--

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Subject: RE: Quilted accomplishments From: "Kathy Moore" <kmoore81austin.rr.com> Date: Sat, 9 Nov 2013 08:38:13 -0600 X-Message-Number: 4

Thank you, Xenia, for sharing this information. I Googled the name of the quilt and went right to the site. It's gorgeous and the article is very interesting. That's a huge piece of work.

Something for all of us to celebrate! Thank goodness for people and organizations like the DeVos foundation. We need more forward thinking generosity such as theirs.

Kathy Moore

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Subject: Re: selling/dispensing of quilts and such From: "Brenda & Roger Applegate" <rbappleg1comcast.net> Date: Sat, 9 Nov 2013 07:03:16 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

My family consists of a husband and 2 sons who would not appreciate my stash nor my equipment. We joke about my "designated" younger friend who will not come to my funeral, but to my house instead, to take out all of my quilt related supplies before the boys burn the fabric and get rid of the tools and books.

Brenda in western Pa.

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Subject: Disposal of sewing tools & etc. From: Stephanie Whitson Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com>

My local quilt guild has a garage sale every once in a while to raise funds for various causes.When ready to get rid of tools etc. I think that would be a good way to do it. I would also check with local quilt shops and see who is teaching KIDS clas ses in beginning quiltingand offer to donate some of my tools as a way of e ncouraging the continuation of quiltmaking inthe younger generation. We have a girls group at our church and the women teach basic sewing skills and the girls makea doll quilt sometimes. That would be another worthy pla ce to offer tools ... as would VacationBible Schools in the area if they do crafts with their kids. Steph Whitson

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Subject: RE: selling/dispensing of quilts and such From: quiltnsharroncharter.net

I lie. I tell my son my books are worth a small fortune!

~~~~~~~~~~~ Sharron K. Evans www.treetopquilting.com Phone: 713-594-6876 Spring, TX ~~~~~~~~~~~

On Sat, Nov 9, 2013 at 3:35 AM, Andi wrote:

> I don't worry so much about how*I* could dispose of my quilts, bu t all my quiltmaking stuff is another matter. Also, if I don't get around to dealing with these matters in time, I'm sure my family won't have a clue how to go about it. Any ideas about these two issues?

Andi in Paducah

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Subject: Re: selling/dispensing of quilts and such From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com>

Another possibility if your have family is left with your quilts to sell is to suggest they contact one of the sellers listed on Kris Driessen's QHL website site to see if one of these businesses would possibly take quilts on consignment. (I personally have no idea if they do or not but at some point I am guessing that a new kind of dealer may get wise to the fact that there is a large market of beautifully made American quilts looking for new homes. Anyone want to start a new business? Just think of the marketing tool---"American made" --- but don't expect to make "boukoos" of money right off the bat. But at least they wouldn't be imports!)

http://quiltbug.com/links/quilts.htm

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Subject: Selling quilts From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzerhotmail.com>

As an appraiser many of the quilts that come to me for evaluation are fo r sale. No one comes to me to buy quilts so the "table" is tilted heavi ly to one side. We have a statewide quilt related e-newsletter in FL written and distrib uted by a wonderful young woman at http://www.floridaquiltnetwork.com/news letters/news182.html I once had her run a blurb for me asking if not begging for a quilt s hop that might consider taking quilts on consignment. I received no respon ses not one. I do understand that space is an issue as well as perha ps liability. But I can't help but think that there is also a stream of in come for the shop owner. Clients ask a lot of hard questions and I'm pretty quick with good answe rs. However when they ask "Where can I sell this quilt?" I just dumb ou t. I give them a half-hearted rundown of the normal avenues.

Teddy Pruett www.teddypruett.com I'm sure I have the smartest pillow in the world. At night when I lie down everything in my head drops right into it.

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Subject: Ann Loveless From: caryl schuetz <carylschuetzyahoo.com>

I had the good fortune to take a workshop with Ann Loveless last Spring. She told us that she had entered that art competition several times bef ore and that she was entering this year making a much larger piece than she had in the past, because she had noticed large art pieces won.Shedid it ! Quite an accomplishment! She makes the quilt world proud.Caryl >________________________________>>Caryl Schuetz>Profe ssional Association of Appraisers - Quilted Textiles>Certified by the American Quilter's Society>www.quiltvalues.com>Home of Fabulous Tee Shirt Quilts>Blogs: http://aboutquilts.wordpress.com > http://woodhavenstudio.wordpress.co m>>________________________________>> --1082104826-944764430-1384105838:38056--

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Subject: RE: Selling quilts From: Stephanie Whitson Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com>

A shop owner could provide a digital album of quilts for sale in a given ar ea on an ipad ... with contact information for anyone interested in buying. That would answer the liability and space issues. I also wonder if most quilt owners dont' think their quilts are worth a lot more than they really are? What I mean is people watch Antiques Roadsho w and see "for insurance purposes" ... and they don't understand they can't expect to turn around and sell something for that amount of money. Still I agree that it would be a wonderful service to area quilters for a shop to find a way to help ... and as teddy said make a little mone y for their trouble. I have also wondered if museums might earn a bit if they took pieces in on consignment for their gift shop ... but again the issue of liability and sp ace comes up I'm sure ... Steph Whitson

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Subject: encouraging new textile historians From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com> Date: Mon, 11 Nov 2013 09:51:42 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

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I am hoping there are younger people than I am out there who are wanting to learn about antique quilts/textiles. I bet lots of us have "teaching" things we would love to pass on at a good deal to others. Are you seeing an interest in antique quilts/textiles from women/men in their 40's and early 50's? It seems that the age at AQSG is 55+ most of the time. I am sure much of that has to do with income and the kids are now out of the nest. Maybe this is where speaking to guilds will help. Now to have time to do that. Later, Lynn Gorges in New Bern, NC

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Subject: Re: encouraging new textile historians From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamoyahoo.com> Date: Mon, 11 Nov 2013 07:16:20 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 2

Hi Lynn,I am 42 and have been studying quilts and their history for abou t 10 years. I always seem to be one of the younger ladies in the group. I also hope younger people will be inspired to quilt and study quilt hi story. I think this Modern Quilt interest will get more young quilting.. .but I am not sure if it will move them to study the history of quilts.I was always a traditional quilter, and loved the repros...it made me think. ..what are they reproductions of? And so started my journey. I try to plant the seeds into the younger generation: my daughters, their friend s, and any young person coming through my booth at shows. The quilt show in Somerset used to have busses come from a highschool with a scavenger hu nt list. That list included quilt history questions. So I was always interviewed by the students. I loved it! I think they cut the trip la st show because of funding. Such a shame. My best,Dana Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android --902471806-1853843116-1384182980:57665--

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Subject: Re: encouraging new textile historians From: Jan Masenthin <quiltsrmeicloud.com> Date: Mon, 11 Nov 2013 09:51:06 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

Sorry to hear about the funding cut but what a great idea.

Jan Masenthin

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Subject: PowerPoint projectors From: Laurel Horton <laurelkalmiaresearch.net> Date: Sat, 9 Nov 2013 09:58:51 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

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When I started my current research on early white bedcovers in 2006, I made the switch from slides to digital. I've done a number of conference presentations in PowerPoint, but I had not done a program for a quilt guild until recently. For that one, a member had to bring in her own projector for my presentation. I've heard that some guilds are able to make use of equipment owned by the churches or other meeting sites, but members of another guild told me that their visiting quilt teachers are expected to bring their own projectors for their lectures.

I'd like to know about the presentation experiences and expectations of other lecturers, particularly those who do programs for quilt guilds. Have any of you had to purchase your own projector? If so, what specs work best?

I have done enough reading to know that there are various performance standards, measured in lumens, throw ratios, and such. And your projector needs to be a good match for your laptop. If I end up buying something, it would need to accommodate a range of presentation environments--day/night, room size, etc. If anyone has figured out a good balance of these attributes, or has discovered a particular brand/model of projector that is reasonably priced and seems to work well in a variety of conditions, that would be helpful to know.

I don't remember seeing a discussion on this topic, but I may not be the only one with questions.

(By the way, the borrowed equipment worked just fine, even though it arrived at the last minute. And the program was well received, so keep this in mind to suggest for your local guild or regional study group!)

Laurel Horton

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Subject: Re: Disposal of sewing tools & etc. From: Julie Silber <silber.julieellengmail.com> Date: Sat, 9 Nov 2013 12:30:55 -0800 X-Message-Number: 2

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Lynn Gorges et al,

How about offering the quilts for sale at local Quilt Guild meetings? Some Guilds might allow non-members to sell, or the seller might know someone in the Guild. I think there are some Guilds that offer advertising in their newsletters. In my "lecturer" hat, I have seen quilts offered for sale sometimes at Guild meetings. Just a thought...

Julie Silber

> > --- > You are currently subscribed to qhl as: silber.julieellengmail.com. > To unsubscribe send a blank email to > leave-qhl-1873964Dlyris.quiltropolis.com >

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Subject: Re: selling/dispensing of quilts and such From: YAK1953aol.com Date: Sat, 9 Nov 2013 08:37:31 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 3

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Our Quilt Guild has a show every two years and has a Peony Shop where new items and books/magazines and assorted stuff are sold to benefit the guild and its projects including bringing in new speakers for educational purposes. This year one member who no longer needed her "stuff" donated (via her son) her collection of ephemera. There was a lot of interest and some discreet pushing and shoving to get at her items shortly after the shop opened. People were excited about her quilt blocks, old fabrics, templates, quilting stencils, tools and historical books. What a wonderful gift to the newer generation of quilters or for those who could not buy those things as new. I consider our quilt guild to be one of the best encouragements to keep quilt making and quilt study alive and well in Indianapolis!

Another great place to donate is to the AQSG (American Quilt Study Group) annual conference where there is a silent and live auction with spirited bidding on books relating to quilt history as well as vintage/antique collections of blocks, vintage tops and vintage quilts. In my experience, this is where you want your "best" ephemera to go.

Recently one of the Quilt Guild members had a "sale" at her house to help with downsizing her collection of "stuff". I didn't attend but I'm sure she got some money and others got great resources to continue on their quilt making path. This was advertised through the guild newsletter and e-mail list only about a week in advance of the sale.

I don't worry too much about that kind of thing. Our craft requires that we have many resources at our fingertips in order to do the work we do. I have sorted through things and given or sold some and then realize later that I needed that particular item and had to purchase it again. I have learned NOT to downsize unless I MUST! Good luck with your plan... Theresa Arnold

In a message dated 11/9/2013 4:36:14 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, areynolds220comcast.net writes:

I don't worry so much about how*I* could dispose of my quilts, but all my quiltmaking stuff is another matter. Also, if I don't get around to dealing with these matters in time, I'm sure my family won't have a clue how to go about it. Any ideas about these two issues?

Andi in Paducah

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: yak1953aol.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1874076Hlyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: RE Getting Younger People Involved in Quilt History From: Jo Major Ciolino <joanniemajgmail.com> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2013 14:51:07 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

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Hi Lynn - I'm wondering the same thing, especially as I read about how Roderick Kiracoffe's exhibit of vintage quilts was such a hit at the MQG show a while back. So many quilts of the past inform and inspire what is happening today but how to reach that group and let them know what a remarkable resource quilt history can be? Is the term "history" that turns off younger quilters, or it is just something that will come to them later? (As it did for me - when I first started in my 30's I wasn't interested, but after I was quilting a few years I wanted better information and more inspiration). * Why Quilts Matte*r is offering streaming video episodes on Amazon (and the downloadable resource discussion guide is free) so that might be a way to reach digitally inclined quilters. It's all about the history and politics and goes up to current trends. Once you start listening (and seeing) and learning, the desire to learn more finally sinks in. Since this generation was raised on TV and videos, it might be a good way (or tool?) to draw them in to regional study groups or the AQSG. The tools are out there, the challenge is to bring them to the younger people! Joan

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Subject: Re: Selling quilts From: tquiltsmac.com Date: Sun, 10 Nov 2013 15:58:48 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

I am an appraiser also, and agree with Teddy - I am usually hard-pressed to be able to tell my clients how to sell their quilts. I wish it were easy! I also handle estate sales, and I can tell you that quilts usually do not sell for big bucks at these sales. Most of my buyers are only looking for bargains and don't want to pay what I think the quilts are worth. It's a real problem! Terri Ellis ISA CAPP mistletoesales.net tquiltsmac.com

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Subject: RE: Selling quilts From: Julie Silber <silber.julieellengmail.com> Date: Sun, 10 Nov 2013 15:49:05 -0800 X-Message-Number: 6

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Stephanie Whitson,

IMO, you are right on the money. Yes, space and liability are issues for us dealers, especially on consignment items. On small ticket items, a reasonable commission (30 - 40%) remains not much money. (1/3 of $300 is $100 for the dealer. 1/3 of $600 is $200 for the dealer. Not a lot, considering the cost of doing business.)

And yes, people frequently have inflated ideas about what their quilts are worth. We appreciate it when folks allow us to guide them in pricing. There are TONS of ordinary quilts out there. Unless yours is truly extraordinary, or priced very, very reasonably, your quilt will sit around for a very long time. Space, and liability right there.

We dealers also do not want to have "stale" inventory. Things should be priced to move within a few months; a year at the outside.

I think your idea, Stephanie, of having a catalog, online or otherwise, of quilts for sale is super, and could work. A "clearing house," so to speak.

The dealer could "host" the quilt, bringing both the customers and confidence (by reputation). The dealer could charge a percentage of the final sale price, based on having brought those two very critical factors to bear. What quilt owners need is A. an audience of buyers, and B. an audience of buyers who can trust the person who is "selling" the quilt. (The quilt owner can pack and ship after the sale is made.)

This sounds doable to me. It will be interesting to see if someone pick it up, and if it works. Keep us posted if any of you give it a try!

Julie

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Subject: Re: Disposal of sewing tools & etc. From: Dale Drake <ddrakeccrtc.com> Date: Sun, 10 Nov 2013 13:47:35 -0500 X-Message-Number: 7

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All:

My daughter knows to donate everything that she doesn't want to either the Quilters Hall of Fame or to AQSG, for their silent auctions. It's not in writing (yet), but she knows I'll haunt her if she doesn't do it. :-)

Dale Drake in Indiana

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Subject: RE: Selling quilts From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessenyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2013 12:53:55 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 8

Thanks for mentioning my site, Quiltbug.com. If anyone here has a website that sells quilts, I would be glad to link to it. I also put a t ab on the QuiltHistory.com gallery page for people to sell items, too, but so far no one has used it.Another resource might be http://www.quilts forsale.ca/. They sell finished quilts of any age, I believe.Kris

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Subject: RE: Selling quilts From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquiltsyahoo.com> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2013 14:21:34 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 9

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HI Kris I would appreciate it if you would add my site to your list. It's o nly antiques, no new quilts, no fabric or supplies. thanksLaura Fi sher's FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Street,New York NY 10065 cell: 917 /797-1260; tel: 212/ 838-2596 email: fisherheritageyaho o.com web: www.laurafisherquilts.com facebook: Laura Fisher Quilts >________________________________> F

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Subject: RE: Selling quilts From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Tue, 12 Nov 2013 20:07:57 -0600 X-Message-Number: 10

Kris, Thanks for mentioning the eboard gallery for Quilts for Sale. Great idea and I appreciate your doing that. I just posted one I am offering so maybe people will take a look and soon there will be more using the eboard for selling a quilt.... I have toyed with the idea of an Etsy shop but it seems too hard and I only have a few things I will part with! Jean ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: encouraging new textile historians From: kittencat3aol.com Date: Wed, 13 Nov 2013 06:13:14 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 1

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*raises hand*

I'm 53, and I definitely was one of the youngest people at Seminar a few ye ars back. It was a little odd, especially since in my other hobbies (SF fa ndom and medieval re-enactment) I'm usually one of the *older* people....:)

Lisa Evans

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Subject: RE: RE Getting Younger People Involved in Quilt History From: Stephanie Whitson Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com>

I don't know "the answer" but it seems to me that the visual nature of q uilts could be tapped to teach all kinds of things and thereby draw young p eople in to study quilt history. Cross-disciplinary lesson plans & etc. Sadly I think "history" as a discipline is a synonym for "boring" to too many kids today. I don't know how to "fix" that but I do believe in the power of artifacts and connecting those artifacts dates etc. to p eople. The personal aspect of the quiltmakers would appeal to many it se ems to me. Of course to use quilts to teach history (and thereby learn quilt history) one has to face the UGRR myth because that's what most teachers "kno w" about quilt history today. Sigh. Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Getting younger folks involved in quit history From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Sun, 17 Nov 2013 06:17:43 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I apologize if I am repeating someone else with a few thoughts. I haven't had time to read all my QHL digests in more than a week, but picked up on a current thread about trying to interest younger people in quilting and quilting history. I was wondering if a few of you who do own antique quilts and are educated historians might donate your time here and there for a few historical lectures at a local school? Schools couldn't afford to pay you, but if you went in even once a year and gave an interesting talk, it might help to get kids interested. I made a teacher's quilt with my daughter's class when she was in 2nd grade, it was an end of the year gift/project and the teacher knew it would be hers to start with. It had a large School House Quilt block in red and white in the center and squares all the way around it where the kids signed their names and I included hand appliqued apples around the outer edges and in a few arbitrary places to break up the signature squares. The teacher loved it and the kids truly enjoyed working on it. I gave a little talk to the kids about sewing machines and how quilts can become family heirlooms and collectible. I even went as far as to contact some kind of council (I can't recall the name) that was all about cotton. They sent me actual cotton as it is grown, I guess you would call is "raw" cotton that has yet to be made into anything. I passed that around for the kids to touch and showed them photos of how the cotton is processed into fabric. I passed around cotton batting and also cotton fabrics. I had photos of looms that are used to weave and told them how the cotton is made into other things a little bit. A talk like I gave didn't have to be tied to making a teacher's quilt, but it could be a preface to talking about the Civil War era and the importance of cotton and how essential it is in our lives and then the talk could be also about historical quilts and whatnot. If real quilts that were older and historical quilts/patterns were shown as part of a lecture, then it would be something the school might like to have happen. Kids need inspiration and their minds do soak up information well at certain ages. In a 2nd grade class setting, thy sat around me in a circle on the floor and they asked me tons of questions. I had a quilt in a hoop and demonstrated how I hand quilted to hold the layers together. I showed them what a quilt "sandwich" was and passed my hoop around for them to hold and touch. When we made the quilt, itself, I brought two of my Singer Featherweights in to the class and I had two other parents come in to help. I drew a light stitching line on the fabric (1/4") and the other parents as well as myself helped the kids sew. I had to put the foot pedals for the machines on a box to get them to be able to use the machines, but I was impressed as to how well they did it. The kids so enjoyed making the quilt and learning about cotton, fabrics and the sewing experience. That teacher said that it was the nicest teacher gift she had ever received and it hangs behind her sofa on her living room wall. She invited me back the next year to give a little lecture to the kids and I went and showed them the same things, but as it was not my daughter's class anymore, I did not go as far as making a quilt. We moved away from that town at the end of that year, but I would have gone back if asked to do it again. I am actually feeling a bit guilty that since we moved and my kids got older and I got busier that I have not tried to promote the art of quilting myself since them. I shall give thought to that. I think it would be a good idea for me to re-invent my lecture and offer it to a local school. I did this with 2nd graders, but I think it might be more impactful if it were done about 5th grade, perhaps? The kids that sat with me in 2nd grade probably don't remember much of what I said, but as kids get a bit older, I think they retain a bit more. I do not own any historical quilts, though, but I could show some of my own quilts and my grandmother's quilts (which are in bad shape and not pretty) and show pictures of a couple of truly historical quilts for them to see. Does anyone know where one can get raw cotton nowadays? : ) So, if a few people with older quilts were inclined to give a lecture to the kids and show them how cotton is made and talk about how important quits are from a historical as well as artistic sense, it could help greatly to bring forth a new generation of people interested in quilts. While I am here, I also want to share that if any of you are certified quilt appraisers or historians, or work at museums, you might think of offering an unpaid internship to a college student that would be a learning experience for the student and also give you some free help. That is also something to think about.

Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

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Subject: Re: Getting younger folks involved in quit history From: pollymellocomcast.net Date: Sun, 17 Nov 2013 15:54:58 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 2

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Linda,

I really enjoyed your post. You had many good suggestions for introdu cing quilts to school aged students.

Thank you,

Polly Mello

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Subject: Getting younger folks involved in quilt history From: "Carol Berry" <cberryelite.net> Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2013 06:30:04 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

Linda Hemingway:

I enjoyed reading about the things you have done to talk to students at school about quilting.

My daughter is an elementary teacher, and over the years I've worked with her classes with regards to quilts. We've made quilts together, talked about quilts together, had quilt airings (we strung clothesline between several trees located right outside the classroom to hang the quilts). I usually bring a quilting story to read to the students as well. It has always been a rewarding and entertaining day for me and, I think, for the students.

One of my favorite memories of these quilting days was when I was showing some of my own collection of quilts. I held up my log cabin quilt, purchased in Indiana years ago at an antique store. My comment to the class: "This quilt pattern is known as log cabin. This quilt over 100 years old."

A boy in the class raised his hand. "Did you make the quilt?"

Carol Berry Merced, CA

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Subject: Possible source for raw cotton From: "Dr. Elizabeth A Richards" <elizabeth.richardsualberta.ca> Date: Sun, 17 Nov 2013 14:34:14 -0700 X-Message-Number: 2

One possible source for a sample of raw cotton might be Cotton Incorporated. It is a research and marketing arm for cotton growers/manufacturers.

Elizabeth Richards

-- Dr Elizabeth A Richards elizabeth.richardsualberta.ca

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Subject: Re: Getting younger folks involved in quilt history From: YAK1953aol.com Date: Sun, 17 Nov 2013 22:53:20 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 3

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Just a reminder that many schools now require ANY volunteer, including parents, to get a security clearance from the police department before participating in any class activities. According to my daughter, the cost for that is over $30, even if you only visit once. Sad, isn't it.

Probably a better idea today is to work with 4-H ers and their sewing projects or Girl Scouts, where background checks may not be required. Our Guild used to have a time when children were invited with their parents, to come and learn something quilt related. It was always time consuming but rewarding. You could probably volunteer to teach children at the local quilt shop as well.

Some adults and children may never have the opportunity to get close to or study an antique quilt. So many of us see the quilts for the first time at local museums, never being allowed to touch them. Or we buy quilt history books and study the pictures. For some, it is a rare privilege to see, touch, and study an antique quilt. No one quilted in my family. It was a thrill for me (in my 50's) to find groups that studied old quilts and allowed them to be examined closely. Theresa Arnold Indianapolis

In a message dated 11/17/2013 6:32:54 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, ibquiltncomcast.net writes:

I apologize if I am repeating someone else with a few thoughts. I haven't had time to read all my QHL digests in more than a week, but picked up on a current thread about trying to interest younger people in quilting and quilting history. I was wondering if a few of you who do own antique quilts and are educated historians might donate your time here and there for a few historical lectures at a local school? Schools couldn't afford to pay you, but if you went in even once a year and gave an interesting talk, it might help to get kids interested. I made a teacher's quilt with my daughter's class when she was in 2nd grade, it was an end of the year gift/project and the teacher knew it would be hers to start with. It had a large School House Quilt block in red and white in the center and squares all the way around it where the kids signed their names and I included hand appliqued apples around the outer edges and in a few arbitrary places to break up the signature squares. The teacher loved it and the kids truly enjoyed working on it. I gave a little talk to the kids about sewing machines and how quilts can become family heirlooms and collectible. I even went as far as to contact some kind of council (I can't recall the name) that was all about cotton. They sent me actual cotton as it is grown, I guess you would call is "raw" cotton that has yet to be made into anything. I passed that around for the kids to touch and showed them photos of how the cotton is processed into fabric. I passed around cotton batting and also cotton fabrics. I had photos of looms that are used to weave and told them how the cotton is made into other things a little bit. A talk like I gave didn't have to be tied to making a teacher's quilt, but it could be a preface to talking about the Civil War era and the importance of cotton and how essential it is in our lives and then the talk could be also about historical quilts and whatnot. If real quilts that were older and historical quilts/patterns were shown as part of a lecture, then it would be something the school might like to have happen. Kids need inspiration and their minds do soak up information well at certain ages. In a 2nd grade class setting, thy sat around me in a circle on the floor and they asked me tons of questions. I had a quilt in a hoop and demonstrated how I hand quilted to hold the layers together. I showed them what a quilt "sandwich" was and passed my hoop around for them to hold and touch. When we made the quilt, itself, I brought two of my Singer Featherweights in to the class and I had two other parents come in to help. I drew a light stitching line on the fabric (1/4") and the other parents as well as myself helped the kids sew. I had to put the foot pedals for the machines on a box to get them to be able to use the machines, but I was impressed as to how well they did it. The kids so enjoyed making the quilt and learning about cotton, fabrics and the sewing experience. That teacher said that it was the nicest teacher gift she had ever received and it hangs behind her sofa on her living room wall. She invited me back the next year to give a little lecture to the kids and I went and showed them the same things, but as it was not my daughter's class anymore, I did not go as far as making a quilt. We moved away from that town at the end of that year, but I would have gone back if asked to do it again. I am actually feeling a bit guilty that since we moved and my kids got older and I got busier that I have not tried to promote the art of quilting myself since them. I shall give thought to that. I think it would be a good idea for me to re-invent my lecture and offer it to a local school. I did this with 2nd graders, but I think it might be more impactful if it were done about 5th grade, perhaps? The kids that sat with me in 2nd grade probably don't remember much of what I said, but as kids get a bit older, I think they retain a bit more. I do not own any historical quilts, though, but I could show some of my own quilts and my grandmother's quilts (which are in bad shape and not pretty) and show pictures of a couple of truly historical quilts for them to see. Does anyone know where one can get raw cotton nowadays? : ) So, if a few people with older quilts were inclined to give a lecture to the kids and show them how cotton is made and talk about how important quits are from a historical as well as artistic sense, it could help greatly to bring forth a new generation of people interested in quilts. While I am here, I also want to share that if any of you are certified quilt appraisers or historians, or work at museums, you might think of offering an unpaid internship to a college student that would be a learning experience for the student and also give you some free help. That is also something to think about.

Linda Heminway Plaistow, NH

--- You are currently subscribed to qhl as: yak1953aol.com. To unsubscribe send a blank email to leave-qhl-1874076Hlyris.quiltropolis.com

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Subject: Re: Getting younger folks involved in quilt history From: kittencat3aol.com Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2013 12:53:24 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 4

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Depends on the area. In Massachusetts all you need to do is pass a CORI, w hich is mandatory but free if you want to work with young people. My churc h requires it for Sunday School teachers, but I've never heard of it being necessary for a guest speaker.

One thing that I think we *do* need to do: work not with children but with people who are just learning to quilt. That would be a great way not only to pass along the skills (particularly hand piecing and hand quilting, whi ch are in serious trouble if the quilt shows I've been to lately are any gu ide) but also the history of the blocks and techniques. It also - dare I s ay it? - would be a GREAT way to head off the HIPV nonsense before it even begins.

Lisa Evans Easthampton, MA

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Subject: RE Getting Younger Folks Involved in History From: Jo Major Ciolino <joanniemajgmail.com> Date: Mon, 18 Nov 2013 15:18:21 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

So interesting to read the ideas about how to engage the younger generation in quilt history. I loved what Joan Schulze said in a recent interview: "Quilt patterns can be used as a jumping of point for creating unique new designs. Using patterns would only limit creativity if they were presented as an end and not a beginning. Lessons in how patterns are created, color in all its complexity and how women have used patterns to talk about their contemporary concerns can be inspiring. The win-win here is *putting stories and messages into new designs that will continue refreshing women 92s history* as illustrated through their quilts."

Read more here: http://www.whyquiltsmatter.org/welcome/discussion-guide-qa-with/quilts-matt er-question-answer-joan-schulze/

I love the idea about putting stories and messages in to new designs - but they need to learn how it has been done to get started. I think to get the attention of "younger" people you need to have a movie or video that gets them visually (and then mentally) engaged. The Kentucky Quilt Project has a multi-episode DVD that explores just that, and while I'm not a youngster (!) I watch it from time to time to see all the visually stunning quilts that get me inspired again. I've made friends watch it so they will finally "get" what quilting is all about - "Why Quilts Matter: Art, History and Politics" is a tremendous starting off point. Eye candy appeals to all generations! Joan

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Subject: Younger quilters From: linda laird <clproductsgmail.com> Date: Tue, 19 Nov 2013 07:59:44 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Prairie Quilt Guild in Wichita KS sets aside money from their quilt show as a scholarship fund for teachers who may apply regionally for small grants that must show how the funds will be used to promote quilting while teaching classroom skills. The students sometimes bring their work to quilt guild to show and tell. PQG also sponsors a summer program through extension to bring quilters and grandchildren or young friends together for a few days of quilting retreat. Maybe someone reading QHL from Wichita could post some contacts for those of you who are interested in getting something started. It would be nice to learn about what teachers have been inspired to accomplish through quilting with just a little financial incentive.

Linda Laird

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Subject: Quilts in pa From: Dee Dadik <deedadikatt.net> Date: Tue, 19 Nov 2013 15:42:09 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Hi all, I am going to be in doylestown, Lancaster and Bethlehem pa over than ksgiving. What must I see? Thanks, dee

Dee Dadik, Certified Appraiser I Have A Quilt 5689 Concord Hill Dr. Columbus, Ohio 43213 614-861-0478 Thequiltappraiser.com

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Subject: Re Linda Laird Younger Quilters/Hearts & Hands From: Gaye Ingram <gingramsuddenlink.net> Date: Tue, 19 Nov 2013 16:15:01 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

Seeing Linda Laird's mention of way to encourage interest in quilts among young, I thought of the "Hearts and Hands" productions.

I just sent a CD of the film "Hearts and Hands" to a third-grade teacher for use in curriculum for Women's History Month, and I plan to send another to a high school history teacher I know.

I had planned to send the book of the same name by Pat Ferraro and Elaine Hedges, not realizing the film was available on CD, but when I contacted Julie Silber to buy it, I learned the film was, in fact, available on CD----from her, as is the book. "Quilts in Women's Lives" is also available.

I'm hoping the teachers to whom I'm giving these will share the materials with others and that the books and cd will perhaps even encourage an early interest in quiltmaking---or at least an awareness that women also participated in American history. For schools that are history-starved, I can't think of a better gift.

I'm sure most on this list own or at least know the book, which presents American history through the nineteenth-century through the eyes and works of women and their quilts. Very entertaining and also substantive. But I thought some might be like me and not realize the film was available on CD.

This is what one reviewer said about it: "When I was watching it at home, one by one my family sat down and joined me. The panoramic view of American history through the quilts the women made from the Revolutionary War up through the 1800s was fascinating and touching. An excellent video and an excellent book."

Julie told me the film had been used successfully in school curricula as early as second grade. Of course, the older the person, the more they will get from it. It could be used in Guild meetings or shared among members.

As most of you know, the film (that is now on CD) was made by Pat Ferrero and co-produced by Julie Silber.

I might be the only person who was not aware of the cd. If so, I apologize for taking up space here. But maybe mention will suggest a good Christmas gift. And coming up on HIPV season, it might provide a worthy deterrent to that foolishness.

The CD as well as the two books may be purchased from Julie Silber. Her email address is silber.julieellengmail.com

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Re: Quilts in pa From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Tue, 19 Nov 2013 19:34:37 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Hi Dee -

While I don't know of any quilt viewing opportunities in the area you mention (sad, but true), if you can travel route 70 in Maryland, there is an exhibit at the Washington County Fine Arts Museum in Hagerstown, MD. I haven't seen the quilts, and only know what is written in the listing --

http://www.wcmfa.org/exhibits.cfm

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: cute! From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltncomcast.net> Date: Wed, 20 Nov 2013 06:51:15 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Carol said:

My comment to the

class: "This quilt pattern is known as log cabin. This quilt over 100 years old."

A boy in the class raised his hand. "Did you make the quilt?"

That made me laugh out loud. Thanks.

Linda Heminway

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Subject: Getting young people interested in quilts and quilting is our mission! From: Shelly Zegart <zegartquiltgmail.com> Date: Wed, 20 Nov 2013 09:57:33 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

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I have always been an admirer of both" Hearts and Hands" and "Quilts in Womens' Lives"

However, from the posts on this topic it appears that many of you are not aware of the 9 part documentary Why Quilts Matter: History, Art & Politics- . (http://www.whyquiltsmatter.org)

It was envisioned to do just what you are wanting.. and has been aired by more than 200 PBS stations so far. iIs in 300 or more university and public libraries and we have sold thousands of the dvds all over the world. Carolyn Mazloomi was recently quoted as saying

" This series is the most important thing that has happened in quilt history in the past 40 years"

It is perfect for the classroom. It was designed for your group use and classroom use...Each episode is 26 ish minutes long- just right to have a discussion and stay under one hour for a class or presentation

The icing on the cake is that we have created a Discussion Guide for the entire series with questions created for general audiences,the quilting community,Artists and arts organizations, academics and college students, middle and high school students, and museums that will get you or any teacher started

and the whipped cream is that anyone can download the guide electronically at no cost( or purchase a hard copy)

All of this is brought to you (produced and funded) by the non profit The Kentucky Quilt Project Inc that began the quilt project movement, began the Quilt Index, the Alliance and more( with partners of course)The guides were created with money from dvd sales profits!!!

viisit our website www.whyquiltsmatter.org to learn more and you can click the link in this post to see the trailer.

This series was created for you and what you want to do..! How many of you have used the series? How many do not know about it? Lets get going everyone. You do not need to re-invent the wheel. Its there on a silver platter for you.

-- Shelly Zegart 300 Penruth Avenue Louisville, Kentucky 40207 502-897-3819 Executive Producer and Host President, The Kentucky Quilt Project, Inc. www.shellyzegart.com

Why Quilts Matter: History, Art & Politics documentary Below is the series trailer for you to see http://www.youtube.com/watch?vwl05JDMyXmI contactwhyquiltsmatter.org www.whyquiltsmatter.org

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Subject: Two exhibits I just learned about From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Wed, 20 Nov 2013 13:01:54 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3

Cross-posting:

QUILT EXHIBIT AT NATIONAL MUSEUM OF WOMEN IN THE ARTS DEC. 20, 2013 8B APR. 27, 2014

The National Museum of Women in the Arts presents Workt by Hand: Hidden Labor and Historical Quilts, on view Dec. 20, 2013ADApril 27, 2014.

This exhibition showcases 35 18thAD20th-century quilts from the Brooklyn MuseumB9s renowned decorative arts collection. Revealing this mediumB9s shifting cultural status, Workt by Hand explores issues specific to quilting practices such as anonymity, authorship and collectivity as well a s questions the conventional view of quilts as craft rather than fine art, al l through a contemporary feminist lens. The exhibition presents examples of iconic quilt designs and techniques while providing new insights into the different interpretive methods used to understand historical quilts. Spanning two centuries of quilt making, patterns in Workt by Hand include the Barn Raising or Log Cabin style, the Garden Basket style, Double Wedding Band designs, the Rose of Sharon pattern, and the Amish Sunshin e and Shadow style as well as album quilts and crazy quilts. The term workt featured in the exhibition title is an archaic spelling of worked,  and the phrase workt by hand is common in historical quilting literature, indicating the distinctive and personal nature of an object produced by a skilled craftsperson. Hidden labor references the considerable creative energy women have used to create quilts. The labor often went unrecognized by a society that valued individually creative activities undertaken by men . Over time, quilts have been alternately revered as nostalgic emblems of the past, dismissed as womenB9s work or hailed as examples of American ingenuity ; quilts are intertwined with American womenB9s history. Visit the museum website at http://www.nmwa.org/ for more information.

TEXTILE MUSEUM EXHIBIT RECOMMENDATION AD The Textile Museum's special display of Advocacy Quilts: A Voice for the Voiceless from November 16-December 1, 2013. This showing of eight narrative quilts offers vivid windows into the lives of women in marginalized communities across the globe, from Congo and Kosovo, to Belize and Bangladesh. The individual panels created worldwide were assembled into finished works by quilters in the U.S. as an act of solidarity. The quilts are on loan from The Advocacy Project, a non-profit based in Washington, DC which sends graduate students to volunteer in marginalized communities around the world. The Textile Museum is open Fridays - Sundays from 9 Am AD 5 PM. The address is 2320 S Street, NW, Washington, DC 20008. There is on street parking in the area around the museum. On Saturdays and Sundays it is easy to find spaces. RuthB9s email address is ruthnnvagmail.com

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Subject: Interns From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com> Date: Wed, 20 Nov 2013 23:35:45 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

I tried desperately last year to get an intern out of the local community college. The dept. chair for the history dept. was elated when I called to ask if I could work with someone from the college. It was when I was putting together the power point for the study center for AQSG. I need someone to help me with the computer part of it and I thought it would be a great experience for a person to put on applications for jobs. I didn't have one taker. The dept. chair was very disappointed as well. I also offered my help to a student getting a masters in history. No interest..... I am going to keep trying. I have found that most teachers really aren't interested. They seem to think our topic is too narrow for their curriculum and they don't have much time for "extras" since they are teaching to the test so much. I have offered several times to talk about women and children during the CW and was turned down. Not to be negative...just honest. It is very sad.... I tossed out a bag of cotton last week that I had picked on our farm. Sorry... If I get back there do you want some Linda? They are picking right now. Lynn Gorges in New Bern, NC

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Subject: RAW cotton From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com> Date: Wed, 20 Nov 2013 23:44:07 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

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I am being a smarty pants....I just had to chuckle at the term "raw cotton"....Is it COOKED when it is fabric??? Probably so..... My first sewing project (age 6) was making 2 pin cushions for my mother and grandmother. I picked the cotton on our farm. Cut out 2 circles of muslin. Did a running stitch around the circles. Wrote --- I love you ---- in red ink. Stuffed it with the cotton that I had left the seeds in. I still have one of them. That is what got me started. Little did my grandmother and mother know what a big part of my life would revolve around sewing. Lynn Lancaster Gorges, New Bern, NC

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Subject: Re: Quilts in pa From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2013 07:51:05 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi Dee -

I don't know if antiques malls are of interest -- sometimes there are old quilts, sometimes not -- but here's a list of some in the Lancaster area -

1 -- Used to have more older stuff, but now leaning toward collectibles, but worth a walk through Cackleberry Farm Antique Mall (717) 442-8805 3371 Lincoln Hwy E Lancaster, PA http://cackleberryfarmantiquemall.com/

2 -- One of my favorites -- usually has several antique quilts on display -- Nancy Hahn (AQSG seminar vendor) has a case there Paradise Village Antiques (717) 687-8089 3044 Lincoln Hwy E Lancaster, PA

North of Lancaster there is a strip of road north of Ephrata called Antiques Row -- there are many antique malls, some better than others. I found this joint website and learned of some I've never visited -- http://www.antiquescapital.com/antiques.htm

Ones I like from that website -- General Heath's and Heritage Antique Center are next to each other and are very nice Stoudt's Black Angus Antique Mall is very nice on a Sunday and has a nice covered outdoor vendor area Lancaster County Antique Center -- small, but there were textiles there the last time I visited Renninger's -- the outside market on Sunday has gotten smaller over the years, but one never knows who will be there Shupp's Grove -- another outside market, can be nice or sparse

I hope you have a great and safe trip.

Barb in southeastern PA----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Quilts in pa From: Julie Silber <silber.julieellengmail.com> Date: Tue, 19 Nov 2013 17:28:48 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

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Hi Dee and Barb,

After reading Barb's reference to the quilt show in Hagerstown, I found a nice photo of a few of the quilts hanging on display on the Museum's Facebook page.

If you are on Facebook, go to Washington County Museum of Fine Arts and see.

Julie Silber

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Subject: Re: Quilts in pa From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421comcast.net> Date: Fri, 22 Nov 2013 19:31:46 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Thanks, Julie, for the tip about Washington County Art Museum's facebook page -- beautiful quilts.

Barb in southeastern PA

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Subject: Re: selling quilts & how to From: silber.julieellengmail.com Date: Wed, 6 Nov 2013 21:00:00 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3

Lynn,

How about offering the quilts for sale at local Quilt Guild meetings? Some Guilds might allow non-members to sell, or the seller might know someone in the Guild. I think there are some Guilds that offer advertising in their newsletters. In my "lecturer" hat, I have seen quilts offered for sale sometimes at Guild meetings. Just a thought...

Julie Silber

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Subject: RE: Getting young people interested in quilts and quilting is our mission! From: nlo1cornell.edu Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2013 01:41:07 +0000 X-Message-Number: 4

Aafke, See below. This was a discussion on getting kids quilting. But it seems there is a study guide to go with the DVD for middle school kids. Did you know that? Nancy ________________________________________ From: Shelly Zegart [zegartquiltgmail.com] Sent: Wednesday, November 20, 2013 9:57 AM To: Quilt History List Subject: [qhl] Getting young people interested in quilts and quilting is our mission!

I have always been an admirer of both" Hearts and Hands" and "Quilts in Womens' Lives"

However, from the posts on this topic it appears that many of you are not aware of the 9 part documentary Why Quilts Matter: History, Art & Politics- . (http://www.whyquiltsmatter.org)

It was envisioned to do just what you are wanting.. and has been aired by more than 200 PBS stations so far. iIs in 300 or more university and public libraries and we have sold thousands of the dvds all over the world. Carolyn Mazloomi was recently quoted as saying

" This series is the most important thing that has happened in quilt history in the past 40 years" It is perfect for the classroom. It was designed for your group use and classroom use...Each episode is 26 ish minutes long- just right to have a discussion and stay under one hour for a class or presentation

The icing on the cake is that we have created a Discussion Guide for the entire series with questions created for general audiences,the quilting community,Artists and arts organizations, academics and college students, middle and high school students, and museums that will get you or any teacher started and the whipped cream is that anyone can download the guide electronically at no cost( or purchase a hard copy) All of this is brought to you (produced and funded) by the non profit The Kentucky Quilt Project Inc that began the quilt project movement, began the Quilt Index, the Alliance and more( with partners of course)The guides were created with money from dvd sales profits!!! viisit our website www.whyquiltsmatter.org to learn more and you can click the link in this post to see the trailer.

This series was created for you and what you want to do..! How many of you have used the series? How many do not know about it? Lets get going everyone. You do not need to re-invent the wheel. Its there on a silver platter for you. Shelly Zegart ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Interns From: "Candace Perry" <candaceschwenkfelder.com> Date: Thu, 21 Nov 2013 10:13:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

You speak the truth, Lynn. Candace Perry

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Subject: Neat newspaper article - Women's Wear in Wartime From: Sue Reich <suereichcharter.net> Date: Sat, 23 Nov 2013 08:44:06 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I think this article refers to women in the Civil War. The article was orig inally published in the North Carolina Observer, in 1905 in the Delta Herald and Times; the Austin Daily Herald, Austin, Minnesota on September 15, 190 5; the Indiana Messenger, Indiana, Pennsylvania and the Reno Evening Gazett e, reno, Nevada on Feb. 8, 1906. Any ideas? Thanks, Sue

46rom the Delta Herald and Times Delta, Pennsylvania September 22, 1905, page 4 WOMEN'S WEAR IN WARTIME Homemade Cloth of Many Kinds, Scraped Horn for Hats. We had one cotton mill to spin the warp. The people stood in line to get a bunch of cotton for warp. The filling was yarn, cotton, flax and tow. We got our dyestuff from the forest. It was almost as bad on timber as the tanbark trade is now. There was great rivalry among the women to see who could have the prettiest dress. I have a quilt made of cotton and linen called a "Confederate" quilt. The clothing for every member of the family was made from the raw ma- terial, carded, spun, woven, dyed and made with homespun thread. The tow linen cloth had one peculiar- ity. It was a great stretcher. It was often exchanged for other things. A man and his wife started to town with cloth sufficient to get some articles. On the way he remembered he needed a gimlet also. He told his wife. They decided to tie the ends of the cloth to two saplings, he to stretch a gim- let out of it. I took great interest in the silk in- dustry. We fed the worms on mul- berry leaves, and beautiful silk we did have. A bright stripe in a cot- ton dress made it very fine. A family made gloves, beautiful silk mitts with bees embroidered on the back. Noth- ing went to waste. The thorn trees furnished us pins and hairpins. Our millinery was our crowning effort. Hats were made of cotton thread cro- cheated, put on a block, stretched very stiff and ironed, then wired. We had homemade flowers and all kinds of ma- terial for trimming. A cloth frame made stiff and covered with scraped cow's born was much admired. If it did look like a cocoanut cake.--Char- lotte (N.C.) Observer.

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: RE: Neat newspaper article - Women's Wear in Wartime From: Stephanie Whitson Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Sat, 23 Nov 2013 11:01:25 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

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It seems logical because of the term "Confederate cloth" that someone is re miniscing about how they "made do" during that war. I've just been reading the diary of a woman who lived in Tennessee during the war and some of the passing armies of both sides literally impoverished the people who lived in her area ... including her. It sounds like they were fairly well off when the war started (I think the diary mentions four slaves by name and the size of the house etc. leads me to believe that as well as the fact t hat her husband doesn't seem to work at a trade) but by the end of it th ey were huddled in a room trying to keep from starving and just wanting the thing to be over. A real eye-opener in regards to what it was like for the "middling" folk and very different from Mary Chestnut's diary. At any rate I would think this is about the Civil War. And re-reading it I think perhaps the term "Confederate quilt" was given in pride of how they were able to sacrifice for the cause. The women took pride in doing th eir part. But that's me reading between the lines. Stephanie Whitson

 

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Subject: U.S. Sanitary Commission From: "Christine Thresh" <christinewinnowing.com> Date: Sat, 23 Nov 2013 08:34:04 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3

I ran across a lot of information about the United States Sanitary Commission in Anne L. Macdonald's book, *No Idle Hands: The Social History of American Knitting.* The focus is primarily on knitted goods for the soldiers, but quilting is mentioned often in the chapter called "Knitting for the Blue."

I've been delving into knitting history for a new venture of mine, but the information should be of great interest to quilt historians.

Christine Thresh http://threshpublications.com

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Subject: quilt storage From: linda laird <clproductsgmail.com> Date: Sat, 23 Nov 2013 18:20:14 -0700 X-Message-Number: 4

I'm creating a storage system for my quilt block collection using cardboard shoe boxes. Will the non archival shoe boxes matter? Would it help to wrap them in muslin or tissue paper? Most are from the 1930s+ but a few sets are from 1880-1920.

Thanks for any advice.

Linda Laird

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Subject: RE: quilt storage From: "Kim Baird" <kbairdcableone.net> Date: Sat, 23 Nov 2013 20:00:49 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

Linda- You have to keep them from touching the cardboard, unless you buy acid-free boxes. Wrapping them in acid free paper will help, or line the boxes with aluminum foil. You could use clean muslin to wrap instead of paper.

The acids in the cardboard WILL deteriorate over time, leaving marks on your quilt blocks.

Kim

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Subject: Trying to track down this quilt From: Sue Reich <suereichcharter.net> Date: Sun, 24 Nov 2013 10:57:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

 

"The Hoon Quilt" traveled widely during WWI. It was exhibited in Department stores across the nation to raise money for the Red Cross. In your quilt t ravels, have you ever seen it? Thanks, Sue Reich

Here's the transcribed article from the Oregonian Portland, Oregon May 19, 1918, page 52 Grandma's Quilt Brings $5000. Pendleton, Or.,May 18, -- Special word has been received here that the red, white and blue satin quilt made by Grandma Hoon of Umapine 13 years ago for the St. Louis World's Fair, has been sold by the Red Cross in Washington, D.C. for $5000. It won an award at the fair and again at the Seattle Exposition. The buyers plan to return it to the Red Cross to be sold again. It will probably be sent to all the states in the country to be auctioned.

Sent from my iPad

--Apple-Mail-01C290A8-512D-4742-9B08-7ABBD4FC8828--

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Subject: Quilt history documentary From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com> Date: Sun, 24 Nov 2013 20:32:34 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

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I have the quilt history documentary and it is wonderful. Unfortunately it would be difficult in my area to find 5 people who would sit down and watch it in its entirety. Definitely couldn't get high school/college students to do it. It is however a WONDERFUL documentary on quilting and I will keep trying to find an audience to share it with. I am also "dreaming" of doing a weekend class on quilt history within the next year here in New Bern. New Bern is a lovely historic town to visit and I have lots of quilts I would love to talk about. Would definitely draft folks from out of the area. Hmmm.....actually might talk to the library and see if they would be interested in showing the documentary as part of a film series. Would that have to be paid for for them to use it??? Regional study groups are a wonderful outreach tool as well. Lynn Lancaster Gorges in very cold NC...way too early in the year for this!

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Subject: RE: quilt storage From: "Dr. Elizabeth A Richards" <elizabeth.richardsualberta.ca> Date: Sun, 24 Nov 2013 13:25:00 -0700 X-Message-Number: 1

Hello Linda,

Yes, the non archival shoe boxes do matter to storage of textiles over a long period of time. Why not look for polypropylene (5 in the recycling triangle) storage boxes? They come in so many different sizes that you should be able to find one that suits your collection. I found some that were about 13 inches square in the scrap booking section of a craft store. If you can stack them you may find that they don't take too much space.

I wouldn't separate them with tissue because again you are dealing with the acidity of paper. I think it's more convenient to handle them by separating them with a stiffer fabric, like a non-woven fabric. Just make sure the non-woven doesn't have rayon in it, so you don't have an adhesive holding the non-woven fibers together. We have used a stiffer non-woven as "trays" for quilt blocks, handkerchiefs, and small doilies in the Clothing and Textile Collection at the University of Alberta (Edmonton)

Elizabeth Richards, in Edmonton, Alberta where the cross country skiing was wonderful today.

-- Dr Elizabeth A Richards elizabeth.richardsualberta.ca

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Subject: I just love it when this happens! From: Sue Reich <suereichcharter.net> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2013 08:56:34 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Connecticut historical societies and museums frequently call upon me when th ey are planning exhibits involving quilts. I love to be able to help them an d enlighten them about the Quilt Index. Just last week, I was called to my l ocal Gunn Museum to help plan their World War I exhibit beginning this sprin g. The current curator confided that he was not that well acquainted with t he quilt collection. I showed him how to access the entire collection of the Gunn Museum, documented by the Connecticut Quilt Search Project in 1994 and uploaded on the Quilt Index for all to see. Now he and his assistant can l et their fingers do the research without opening a single box. Unfortunatel y, this info was not passed down from the previous curator. Sue Reich

Sent from my iPad

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Subject: Re: Quilt history documentary From: Julie Silber <silber.julieellengmail.com> Date: Sun, 24 Nov 2013 18:36:24 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3

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Hi Lynn,

I am not clear on which "quilt documentary" you mean in your post..

If it is Pat Ferrero's "Hearts and Hands," I am certain that the documentary can be show in a library -- without any fee for showing it. This is presuming that the library would screen it for free.

If the library charges admission, then there is a different fee arrangement.

To reach Pat for more information, please use her e-mail: pfcineearthlink.net

Thanks, Julie Silber

--001a11c228d2eb18ce04ebf73a77--

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Subject: showing Why Quilts Matter one episode at a time in no particular order is how it is designed! From: Shelly Zegart <zegartquiltgmail.com> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2013 09:07:17 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

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In response to Lynn George's post about the documentary "Why Quilts Matter" Thank you for your praise of it. WE are very pleased with its reception everywhere. Quiltmakers are saying it makes them proud and scholars are using it every which way.

No one has to watch it in its entirety. It is designed to watch what ever episodes you wish, one at a time whenever you wish . It is not sequential like a TV series. Our Discussion Guide is for each episode separately. You can get an electronic download of the Discussion Guide at no cost on our site www.whyquiltsmatter.org

Also 4 episodes are now available to purchase or rent streaming on Amazon . Check it out. There are many ways to use each episode.

If the series is shown publicly at a library as part of a film series the library would have to purchase a Public Performance License along with the DVD. It is available on our website as well..

Many thanks for your interest and everybody have a thankful Thanksgiving and keep us your great quilt work! Shelly Zegart

Subject: Quilt history documentary From: Lynn Gorges <llgorgesgmail.com> Date: Sun, 24 Nov 2013 20:32:34 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

--e89a8f3bafef991ed604ebf656c4 Content-Type: text/plain; charsetISO-8859-1

I have the quilt history documentary and it is wonderful. Unfortunately it would be difficult in my area to find 5 people who would sit down and watch it in its entirety. Definitely couldn't get high school/college students to do it. It is however a WONDERFUL documentary on quilting and I will keep trying to find an audience to share it with. I am also "dreaming" of doing a weekend class on quilt history within the next year here in New Bern. New Bern is a lovely historic town to visit and I have lots of quilts I would love to talk about. Would definitely draft folks from out of the area. Hmmm.....actually might talk to the library and see if they would be interested in showing the documentary as part of a film series. Would that have to be paid for for them to use it??? Regional study groups are a wonderful outreach tool as well. Lynn Lancaster Gorges in very cold NC...way too early in the year for this!

-- Shelly Zegart 300 Penruth Avenue Louisville, Kentucky 40207 502-897-3819 Executive Producer and Host President, The Kentucky Quilt Project, Inc. www.shellyzegart.com

*Why Quilts Matter: History, Art & Politics* documentary Below is the series trailer for you to see http://www.youtube.com/watch?vwl05JDMyXmI contactwhyquiltsmatter.org www.whyquiltsmatter.org

--48597dd259b924a904ec00e1cb--

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Subject: RE: quilt block storage From: Stephanie Whitson Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2013 10:27:31 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

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Every time Joann Fabrics has a coupon for 40% off an item I try to use i t on an Art Bin. There are dividers as part of the Bin and I find that m y quilt blocks fit perfectly. They stack and I currently have a stack ha lf as tall as the filing cabinet in my walk-in closet. Art Bins are acid fr ee polypropylene so I'm assuming that's the best I can do for preserving /protecting my antique quilt blocks. I believe Michael's carries them too but Michael's isn't on my "beaten path" in my home town so I don't shop there. Stephanie Whitson

-- ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: JoAnn's Art Bins From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarltoncomcast.net> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2013 12:31:04 -0600 X-Message-Number: 6

Wonderful idea, Stephanie. thanks. - go on-line today and type in 'art bin' - some drastic price cuts on them TODAY only. (I am on their email list and quite often they have free shipping, no minimum too so it's worth signing up for that email.) jean

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Subject: "found" quilt looking for owner From: ikwlt <ikwltyahoo.com>

since so many of us see quilts all the time, i'm hoping that maybe someone might recognize the owner of this one. http://quiltville.blogspot.com/2013/11/lost-and-found-in-illinois.html patti

--975601228-320393572-1385408818:72380--

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Subject: Needing an example of Hexagon Paper Piecing for an exhibition From: Shelly Zegart <zegartquiltgmail.com> Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2013 19:24:15 -0500

For a March 2015 exhibition at the Frazier History Museum in Louisville,Ky. based on the American Index of Design

I am looking for a good example of 19th century hexagon paper piecing to hang in the exhibition to illustrate the technique . Newspapers need to be visible in at least one third of the hexagons . The piece has to be at least three feet by five feet and will have to be able to hang from a sleeve or be backed. It cannot lay flat or on a slantboard. We will be showing only the back in the exhibition. It can be a top, a remnant or a quilt. The museum will pay for all shipping and photography and will give full credit to the lender in both the exhibition and the catalogue.The catalogue will be a University of Kentucky Press publication. Please send me a jpeg to zegartquiltgmail.com

Thanks so much for considering my request. I look forward to receiving some great examples. Any questions email me at zegartquiltgmail.com Many thanks, Shelly

-- Shelly Zegart 300 Penruth Avenue Louisville, Kentucky 40207 502-897-3819 Executive Producer and Host President, The Kentucky Quilt Project, Inc. www.shellyzegart.com

*Why Quilts Matter: History, Art & Politics* documentary Below is the series trailer for you to see http://www.youtube.com/watch?vwl05JDMyXmI contactwhyquiltsmatter.org www.whyquiltsmatter.org

--047d7bf1608420ca2e04ec098016--

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Subject: Re: Trying to track down this quilt From: lv2qwltfrontiernet.net Date: Mon, 25 Nov 2013 14:39:04 -0500 X-Message-Number: 9

I would like to piggy-back on Sue's "have you seen this quilt" post. But as a first-timer I'd like to introduce myself. My name is Carolyn Maruggi. With my husband Edward we live on Lake Ontario, just outside Rochester New York. We judge our daily weather by the moods of a very expressive lake. My love for quilts began in 1979 when I learned how to make them. My passion for antique quilts started shortly after when my mom gave me a c1940s "Crossed Tulips" quilt, made by my grandmother, that she92d been keeping under her bed. I certified as an

AQS quilt appraiser in 1991 and retired 9 years later. I am a member of AQSG and am active in my local Genesee Valley Quilt Club. I discovered signature quilts in 1992 when I found a Delaware County Ohio quilt photo (the subject of this post). My desire to give voice to orphaned signature quilts has grown and I now have several quilts waiting to be heard. When I am not busy with quilts you can find me in my flower garden, or my quilt room or our cottage in the Finger Lakes.

The abbreviated article that follows is from the "Westerville Public Opinion," 1 May 1919, Westerville, Ohio: Railroad school or district number nine, let by the enterprising teacher, Miss Leona Donaldson, distinguished itself by it's zealous war activities. -- It has just now completed a quilt, designed by Miss Donaldson, which contains the names of all the soldiers and sailors of Genoa township. Most of the blocks were made by the children. Mrs. Emma Ingalls made one block which contains the names of four civil war veterans. The company and service of each soldier is given making it a very valuable and accurate record. The school will give a play soon at which time the quilt will be auctioned off by Col. O'Roark.

The article contained all the names on the quilt, 48 from WW1, 8 from

the Civil War and 2 from the Spanish American War, plus 13 students. And, what still amazes me, I have a studio portrait of the quilt, 12" x 14". But I would love to know what happened to it. There were additional articles in local newspapers about the auction, but I have not found anything as yet, about the results or what happened to the quilt. Proceeds were to benefit the Red Cross. I have posted a picture of the quilt. The Big Walnut Area Historical Society has a lot more information. Under Local History - Wars - World War I.

Sorry for the length. Happy Thanksgiving one and all! Carolyn Maruggi : )

On Nov 24, 2013, at 10:57 AM, Sue Reich wrote:

"The Hoon Quilt" traveled widely during WWI. It was exhibited in Department stores across the nation to raise money for the Red Cross.

In your quilt travels, have you ever seen it? Thanks, Sue Reich

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Subject: Re: Trying to track down this quilt From: Karen Alexander <karenquiltrockisland.com> Date: Tue, 26 Nov 2013 14:08:26 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

Welcome, Carolyn to the QHL List! It's great to see you here and at AQSG (as well as at jazz events)!

What a fabulous Signature Quilt that would be to track down!!! Where did you discover the photo of the quilt?

Karen in the Islands

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Subject: RE: Needing an example of Hexagon Paper Piecing for an exhibition From: candaceschwenkfelder.com Date: Tue, 26 Nov 2013 08:44:37 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Shelly -- Does it have to be newspapers? The Filson has one, as I recall -- but I'm not sure if it's newspaper or old bits of manuscript. Candace Perry

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Subject: Exciting collaboration between NMWA and the "Why Quilts Matter" documentary From: Shelly Zegart <zegartquiltgmail.com>

The quilt exhibition Work'd by Hand coming to the National Museum of Women in the Arts in December will have a 30 minute edited version loop of WQM that will run in a designated gallery within the exhibition continuously throughout opening hours ( 10am-5 pm) and during select private , after- hours tours

We are pleased to accomodate this wonderful request and work with Virginia Treanor, Associate Curator on the edits that are most appropriate for the exhibition. This is certainly a win-win for both the museum and the series and another example of how the series can serve to provide context for mutlitple venues and purposes. We would love to collaborate in this fashion with other upcoming exhibitions. Please contact us at : contactwhyquiltsmatter.org.

Shelly Zegart Executive Producer and Host

DEC 20 201396APR 27 2014 93Workt by Hand94: Hidden Labor and Historical Quilts

Over time, quilts have been revered as nostalgic emblems of the past, dismissed as women92s work, and hailed as examples of American ingenuity. This exhibition breaks new ground by examining quilts through the lens of contemporary feminist theory. Revealing this medium92s shifting cultural status, the exhibition explores issues of anonymity versus authorship and fine art versus craft. The display showcases 35 18th9620th-century quilts from the Brooklyn Museum92s renowned decorative arts collection.

- See more at: http://www.nmwa.org/explore/exhibitions/upcoming-exhibitions#sthash.FfHj1c4 H.dpuf

-- Shelly Zegart 300 Penruth Avenue Louisville, Kentucky 40207 502-897-3819 Executive Producer and Host President, The Kentucky Quilt Project, Inc. www.shellyzegart.com

*Why Quilts Matter: History, Art & Politics* documentary Below is the series trailer for you to see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v3Dwl05JDMyXmI contactwhyquiltsmatter.org www.whyquiltsmatter.org

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Subject: MESDA Textile Seminar From: Andi <areynolds220comcast.net> Date: Thu, 28 Nov 2013 03:40:54 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

My only affiliation with MESDA, the Museum of Early and Decorative Arts, is that it is in my hometown of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. My mom, ever hopeful of enticing me to visit, sent me this link to an upcoming seminar that might be of interest to members on this list:

http://www.mesda.org/programs_sprite/prog_calendar_sprite/mesda_2014-mesda-textile-seminar-charleston.html

For those traveling through the area, MESDA is always a great stop. They have a wonderful quilt collection available to researchers by request. If memory serves, everything in their various interior deign collections predates 1850. MESDA is co-located with Old Salem, a living history museum that is fascinating year round.

Andi in Paducah

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Subject: Textiles on History Detectives From: Stephanie Whitson Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com>

http://video.pbs.org/video/2261437792/ I enjoyed this episode so much I wanted to share it with someone ... but no one else would "get it" except this group. So. This episode is textile-hea vy. A WW II patch a pair of Osage leggings possibly worn at the Washita and a fragment purporting to be part of the Confederate flag that Ellsw orth took down from a hotel in Alexandria VA (and lost his life in the e ffort). The textile conservator who looked at the one inch square talks abo ut the fibers looking through a special microscope etc. Fascinating. Stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Re: Textiles on History Detectives From: mpersyn <mary.persynvalpo.edu> Date: Sat, 30 Nov 2013 15:37:05 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

I haven't had a chance to watch the whole episode yet, but the expert consul ted in the second segment (on a Lincoln signature) showed MFSG the Museum's L incoln textiles when we met in Springfield IL last spring.

He was very interesting and informative.

Mary

Sent from my iPad

Mary Persyn Mary.persynvalpo.edu