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Subject: churn dash/monkey wrench From: Donald Beld <donbeld@pacbell.net>

Speaking of patterns. I have, after all these years, finally figured = out what is different between the two Churn Dash/Monkey Wrench patterns.= One is based upon a five line grid; the other on a six line grid. In short, the five line grid has squares in the side centers, while the si= x line grid has rectangles in the side centers.It makes the center b= lock a different size in each pattern.AAMy question is this:= I have seen many, many late 19th Century ChurnDash/Monkey Wrench = quilts--and all of them are the five line grids (squares).Don't see = any of the six line grid (rectangles) until the Twentieth Century--although= it seems to be the more popular pattern today.AACan anyone refer= ence me to a 19th Century six line grid (rectangles) Churn Dash/Monkey Wren= ch; or is this, indeed, a Twentieth Century pattern?A= AP.S. the rectangle one is also called Sherman's March and Lincoln's Plat= form, while the 19th Century pattern (squares) isn't.best, Don =

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Subject: churn dash/monkey wrench From: "Mary Waller" <mwaller@vyn.midco.net> Date: Tue, 3 Dec 2013 11:09:37 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

A friend has c. 1880 Churn Dash that's more of a 6-1/2 x 6-1/2 or 7 x 7 grid. It's similar to the 6 x 6 version, but the center square is slightly larger, the rectangles are slightly thinner, and the triangles are slightly smaller. I love the proportions of it.

Barbara Brackman has the 6 x 6 version, colored in the Greek Cross version, as Ladies Art Company #152 and named "Grecian Designs", likely from 1895. It's 1646b in her Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns.

Brackman also shows a Churn Dash based on a 10 x 10 grid with a very large center square and small triangles in the corners as a Ladies Art Company #112, likely from 1895. It's Brackman 2116.

Are they earlier references to the Churn Dash or Monkey Wrench names than the Ladies Art Company patterns in 1895?

Mary Waller Vermillion, South Dakota, USA

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Subject: Re: churn dash/monkey wrench From: Donald Beld <donbeld@pacbell.net> Date: Tue, 3 Dec 2013 12:16:13 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 2

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Yes, I have seen the odd LAC #112, Brackman 2116; but only seen it in a ver= y few very late 1890's early 1900's sampler quilts.I am referencin= g the Brackman 1646a, which appears to be the one in 20th century quilts; a= nd Brackman 1850, which is the one seen in so many 1880's and 1890's churn = dash quilts. I am concluding these two patterns are from different eras = and popularity--that's why I wonder if the 20th Century version was even ar= ound in the 1800's. I have yet to see a quilt with it.It's an i= nteresting question.I am finding subtle differences in patterns to= be very interesting. For example, those of you who are interested--look= at the subtle differences between Hearts and Gizzards, Martha's Choice, an= d Square and Compass--all slightly different from each other.best,= Don BeldA ________________________________=

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Subject: Inscribed Fundraiser Quilt from Omaha From: Mary Persyn <mary.persyn@valpo.edu> Date: Wed, 4 Dec 2013 09:55:11 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

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For anyone interested

http://www.omaha.com/article/20131204/LIVING/131209669/1696#quilt-found-in-church-basement-going-to-museum-at-unl

-- Mary G. Persyn Associate Professor of Law Emerita Valparaiso University Law School Valparaiso, IN 46383

mary.persyn@valpo.edu

--001a11c24dc01e93cd04ecb770f1--

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Subject: RE: Inscribed Fundraiser Quilt from Omaha From: Stephanie Whitson Higgins <authorsgw@msn.com> Date: Wed, 4 Dec 2013 10:09:17 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

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I'm so glad it's staying at "home" in the state of Nebraska. Reminds me of = the Palladian Quilt that came "home" via a rummage sale in California. Than= ks for sharing this.Stephanie Whitson =

--_07e31417-5b8d-4011-98d0-573114e219bf_--

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Subject: 18th-19th century toiles based on pop lit From: Gaye Ingram <gingram40@gmail.com> Date: Wed, 4 Dec 2013 15:34:05 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

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Pique Trouver had a toile bed cover English print based on the popular "Dr. Syntax" picaresque novels of the late 18th-early 19th century. Later, I discovered the good Doctor's story in transferware of the time. (e.g., http://www.ebay.com/itm/ADAMS-LARGE-BOWL-DR-SYNTAX-BOUND-TO-A-TREE-/231108914344?ssPageNameDME:B:WNARL:US:1123 )

The thought of Dr. Syntax in a bedcover amuses me, but I wonder if other popular fictional characters were used in fabric and transferware. I know Robinson Crusoe appears in china.

Anyone know?

Gaye Ingram

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Subject: Re: 18th-19th century toiles based on pop lit From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamo@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 4 Dec 2013 14:45:07 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 4

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Hi Gaye,A"Toile - The Storied Fabrics of Europe and America" by Michele P= almer has a chapter on toiles with themes from novels, poems, songs, and fa= bles. I have had (and sold) Jeanne D' Arc and L'Histoire de Joseph. = AShe also lists Le Meunier, Son Fils et l'Ane (The Miller, His Son, and T= he Ass), Les Fables de la Fontaine (La Fontaine's Fables), Don Quixote, Rob= inson Crusoe (as you noted), La Dame du Lac (Lady of the Lake), Mariage de = Figaro (Marriage of Figaro). Not listed, but in my possession, is also a= toile with Marie, Daughter of the Revolution, which was an opera. AMy= best,ADanAOn Wednesday, December 4, 2013 5:05 PM, G= aye Ingram <gingram40@gmail.com> wrote:A APique Trouver had a toile be= d cover English print based on the popular "Dr.ASyntax" picaresque novels= of the late 18th-early 19th century. Later, IAdiscovered the good Doctor= 's story in transferware of the time. (e.g.,Ahttp://www.ebay.com/itm/ADAM= S-LARGE-BOWL-DR-SYNTAX-BOUND-TO-A-TREE-/231108914344?ssPageName=3DADME:B:WN= ARL:US:1123A)The thought of Dr. Syntax in a bedcover amuses me, but= I wonder if otherApopular fictional characters were used in fabric and t= ransferware. I knowARobinson Crusoe appears in china.Anyone know?= Gaye Ingram ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: 18th-19th century toiles based on pop lit From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com> Date: Thu, 5 Dec 2013 08:42:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

There's a line of later transferware that's Shakespeare! Probably late 19th --early 20. Candace Perry

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Subject: Quilt exhibit in Hagerstown, MD From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421@comcast.net> Date: Thu, 05 Dec 2013 08:55:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Good Morning All, and I apologize if you receive this several times as I'm posting to several lists --

I was fortunate to visit the quilt exhibit at the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts in Hagerstown, MD. The quilts are wonderful and I heartily recommend a visit to view them.

Sadly, I had 2 disappointment/frustrations. The first I half expected -- no photography allowed. I always figure there's a 50% chance of being allowed to take photos for personal use, and since the last 3 museum quilt exhibits I've attended -- NYC Folk Art Museum, Richmond's VA Historical Society, and Mercer Museum in Doylestown, PA all allowed photos, I was due for one that didn't allow them. But it's still very disappointing -- mostly because my brain can't remember all the new designs and color combinations.

Which brings me to my other larger disappointment/frustration -- the way the quilts were displayed. They were hung so high that you couldn't study them. I am used to quilts being exhibited at "eye level", as they were in the wonderful exhibits at the above listed museums, where one can look at the stitching, and the fabric, and study the quilting, and signatures. The lower edge of between 1/3 and 1/2 of the quilts was above my head. Of the others, "eye level" was the bottom border. It was impossible to look at the quilts closely, or to find the signatures mentioned on several. I was constantly looking "up", trying to see the quilts. However, I was only able to study the lower 10 to 20% of any quilt -- the rest of the quilt was too high up the wall. I was quickly reminded of how quickly a "crick in my neck" can develop.

The bars holding the quilts were all hung at the same distance from the ceiling -- without regard to the length of the quilt. I've never seen quilts exhibited in this manner, and wondered if, being an Art Museum, this was how they hung all their exhibits. So I ventured to other galleries to see the paintings -- and they were hung at eye level so they could be viewed and studied by the visitors. I don't understand the reasoning behind this manner of display for the quilts. It certainly lessened the value of the experience for me.

If you scroll down the museum's facebook page, you will see several pictures of the exhibit. https://www.facebook.com/pages/Washington-County-Museum-of-Fine-Arts/89160781895

There are 26 quilts plus a pair of Victorian pieced and embroidered pillow shams in the exhibit. With no photos, I had to go old school and take notes --

1. Turkey Red Signature Sampler -- c1850 with 7 signatures (would love to have seen how they were done) 2. PA Ocean Waves 3. 4 block Whig Rose 4. 9 patch pieced strippie with unviewable signature 5. 9 block Whig Rose with interesting rose in pot motif

6. Mariner's Compass with pineapples 7. 4 block Tulip with Cactus leaves 8. North Carolina Lily -- unusual setting 9. Silk Star of Bethlehem 10. Mariner's Compass

11. Log Cabin Barn Raising 12. PA Ocean Waves 13. Pair Crazy type pillow shams 14. 1884 Signed Crazy -- elegant 15. Pieced Sampler -- 16 incredible mini quilts joined and framed

16. Blazing Star/Touching Star 17. c1850 Rose Applique 18. 4 block Whig Rose 19 4 block Floral Burst -- soft curved edges on flower points 20. c1850 Rose Wreath with unusual chain border

21. 9 block Rose of Sharon quilted bars fashion with no regard to applique design 22. Red/Gr/Cheddar/Yellow sample with the skinniest pointed 4" compass blocks 23. Album applique but could not see the signatures Laura Hile May 5, 1850 and Louisa Hile May 6, 1850 24. Printed Wools Courthouse Steps 25. PA Star of Bethlehem, signed Annie Landis Groff 1855 in the lower border (which I could see because that was eye level)

26. c1850 Princess Feather 27. pieced Harvest Sun with unviewable initials

Most of the quilts were maker unknown and appear to be collected for visual impact. The quilts are gorgeous. Predominate theme was red and green applique on white, but enough other styles to balance that.

If you are able, I do recommend a visit to see the quilts. When I described the hanging arrangement to a quilt history friend, her reaction was to ask "So is it worth going?" Yes -- the quilts are worth viewing. I wish I could have studied them.

In the exhibit of Folk Art Toys, there was a quote from Eleanor Lakin that I thought fit with any medium (including quilts) -- "...artists live to create and they create to satisfy the soul." She was explaining why she felt people continued to make dolls and toys by hand after manufacturing came on the scene. I believe the thinking holds true for quilts also -- why quilts were/are made when there are more efficient ways to acquire a bed covering.

Barb in southeastern PA Feeling blessed by her quiltie adventures

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Subject: Dr. Syntax quilt From: Bunnie Jordan <bunjorda@aol.com> Date: Thu, 5 Dec 2013 09:55:35 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 3

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A wholecloth quilt in the collection of the DAR features the Dr. Syntax toi= le and is pictured in the Quilts of Va book (p 143.)

Also: Just got back from seeing the Interwoven exhibit in NY. Just fabul= ous! Happy Holidays all Bunnie Jordan

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Subject: Inscribed Fundraiser Quilt from Omaha From: lynnquilt@aol.com Date: Thu, 5 Dec 2013 11:01:11 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 1

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I returned a redwork signature quilt, dated 1896 by the Ladies Aid Society, I found in Oregon to a church in a small town in Kansas. If was a very gratifying experience. It was shown and displayed all over town and in the church. Written and talked about for months.

Lynn Miller http://quilts-vintageandantique.blogspot.com https://www.facebook.com/groups/quiltsvintageandantique

For anyone interested

http://www.omaha.com/article/20131204/LIVING/131209669/1696#quilt-found-in-= church-basement-going-to-museum-at-unl

--=20 Mary G. Persyn Associate Professor of Law Emerita Valparaiso University Law School Valparaiso, IN 46383

mary.persyn@valpo.edu

--001a11c24dc01e93cd04ecb770f1--

=20

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Subject: Hagerstown quilt exhibition From: "Debby/Marc" <resmar@comcast.net> Date: Fri, 6 Dec 2013 11:43:52 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

The quilts at the Washington County MoFA are definitely worth visiting. While the quiltmakers are largely anonymous, the quilts production, largely in the local area, is assured. The owners of the collection live in the Hagerstown area, are very knowledgeable on local history, and buy from local auctions and dealers. Their quilts show the "abundance" of western Maryland and nearby Pennsylvania during the time the quilts were made-mid-19 to early-20th centuries-in skilled sewing, fabric availability, and pattern design. The mention of "scarcity" in the title has me scratching my head. These are all best quilts--no recycled fabrics--made in a prosperous agricultural & commercial area. Merikay Waldvogel will be at the museum on January 9 for a "Quilt Sharing & Authentication Day" in which she analyzes quilts brought in by visitors and does a galley tour of the exhibition. Should be a great day. Debby Cooney

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Subject: Colouring the Nation From: Lynne Bassett <lynne@lynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Sat, 07 Dec 2013 15:54:26 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

I just received word from Sally Tuckett that her book, "Colouring the Nation: The Turkey Red Printed Cotton Industry in Scotland" is now available! Here's the link to amazon: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Colouring-Nation-Industry-Scotland-C-1840-1940/dp/1905267800/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1386332447&sr=8-1&keywords=colouring+the+nation

Enjoy!

All best, Lynne Bassett

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Subject: RE: Colouring the Nation From: Stephanie Whitson Higgins <authorsgw@msn.com> Date: Sat, 7 Dec 2013 20:01:28 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

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Oh=2C my goodness. The cover alone makes me want it =3B-)Stephanie Whitson =20 =

--_c39694c9-5e82-439f-89f5-764b37a18d4c_--

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Subject: American Folk Art Museum magazines now online From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooney@moonware.net> Date: Sat, 7 Dec 2013 18:45:53 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3

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Good evening, QHLers - Just came across the following press release from the American Folk Art Museum (in New York). Woo hoo! the access is free:

A fully-accessible, digital archive of 117 issues of magazines published by the American Folk Art Museum from 1971 through 2008 will go online and be available to all beginning December 6, 2013. More than 10,000 pages of Folk Art and The Clarion-including scholarly articles and texts, photographs, illustrations, advertisements, calendars, and more-have been digitized and can be reached via the Museum's website at www.folkartmuseum.org <http://www.folkartmuseum.org/> and following links to "Publications" and "Magazines." The archive is organized chronologically.

Dr. Anne-Imelda Radice, Ph.D., Executive Director of the Museum, commented: "This invaluable archive is but one way in which the American Folk Art Museum continues to provide education and leadership in the extraordinary fields of both traditional folk art and the creative expressions of the self-taught. Making the issues available online further extends the reach of the Museum and advances our mission."

The digitization and launch of the archive has been made possible by a generous grant from Museum Trustee Karin Fielding and her husband, Dr. Jonathan Fielding, which matched funding from the Friends of Heritage Preservation. These grants were spurred by a gift from the American Folk Art Society.

Published (on average) three times each year, The Clarion, later called Folk Art, was a preeminent forum for original research and new scholarship in the encompassing field of American folk art. Reflecting the mission of the museum, the articles embraced new perspectives on a wide variety of topics ranging from traditional arts such as portraiture, schoolgirl arts, painted furniture, and pottery, to original discourses on under-recognized artists. Features and articles were written not only by American Folk Art Museum curators, but also by scholars and experts in a variety of fields, with subject matter spanning three centuries. The publications were lavishly illustrated with meticulous care, and included news about the Museum as well as exhibitions around the country, illustrated advertisements from a stellar roster of dealers and auction houses, and other related information.

Tanya Heinrich, the Museum's Editor and Director of Publications, and a former publisher of the magazines prior to their cessation, directed the project with the assistance of Elena Terhune, a researcher from Smith College.

Currently, the magazines are searchable by issue; the complete index of all issues will be available in the summer of 2014.

Happy December to all!

Regards,

Meg

. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________

Margaret E. Geiss-Mooney

Textile/Costume Conservator &

Collections Management Consultant

Professional Associate - AIC

707-763-8694

mgmooney@moonware.net

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Subject: Re: Colouring the Nation From: <judy.grow@comcast.net> Date: Sat, 7 Dec 2013 23:13:09 -0500 X-Message-Number: 4

Does anyone know how to figure out what it costs American $ ?

Judy Grow

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Subject: Re: Colouring the Nation From: Stephanie Whitson Higgins <authorsgw@msn.com>

$29.41 according to this site: http://www.poundstodollars.co.uk/ stephanie Whitson

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Subject: Re: American Folk Art Museum magazines now online From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt@rockisland.com> Date: Sun, 08 Dec 2013 09:50:07 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

On 12/7/13 6:45 PM, "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooney@moonware.net> wrote:

> Good evening, QHLers - Just came across the following press release from the > American Folk Art Museum (in New York). Woo hoo! the access is free:

FANTASTIC! Thanks, Meg, for letting us know.

Karen Alexander

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Subject: Re: Colouring the Nation From: textique@aol.com Date: Sun, 8 Dec 2013 15:51:00 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 2

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It is also sold at The Book Depository with free shipping. =20

www.bookdepository.com

Jan Thomas

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Subject: Re: Colouring the Nation From: Lynne Bassett <lynne@lynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Sun, 08 Dec 2013 00:16:57 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

With shipping, it cost $42.41.

On 12/7/2013 11:13 PM, judy.grow@comcast.net wrote: > Does anyone know how to figure out what it costs American $ ? > > Judy Grow

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Subject: Re: Colouring the Nation From: modojandj@aol.com Date: Sun, 8 Dec 2013 00:58:45 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 4

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It's approximately $47.00 American including packaging and shipping. If you can wait til April it will be available for half that.on Amazon.

Jean Odom

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Subject: Re: Colouring the Nation From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt@rockisland.com> Date: Sun, 08 Dec 2013 22:41:30 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

Won't Amazon carry it eventually?

Karen Alexander

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Subject: 1898 Advertising Quilt From: Jo Major Ciolino <joanniemaj@gmail.com> Date: Mon, 9 Dec 2013 10:34:52 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

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Look what was found in a church's hunt for fundraising items - an 1898 quilt that had advertisements embroidered in blocks. It's wonderful! http://goo.gl/8DL7p0

Have a look - if the link gets scrubbed, just go to the KETV (Omaha) website and find the story (and film) there. It's killer! Joan

--f46d040f9dfeb403eb04ed1bbcee--

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Subject: Re: Colouring the Nation From: "Janet Finley" <jquilter@comcast.net> Date: Mon, 9 Dec 2013 07:30:07 -0700 X-Message-Number: 3

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I just ordered it on http://www.bookdepository.com <http://www.bookdepository.com/> . It is paperback ($32.00 US) discounted to $23.27 US plus free shipping. It is noted that it won't be available until April 7, 2014. - Janet Finley

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: December 09, 2013 From: <gebel@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 09:14:46 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

Amazon.com has Colouring the Nation available on pre-order.

> > 1. Re: Colouring the Nation > 2. 1898 Advertising Quilt > 3. Re: Colouring the Nation > >

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Subject: Lowell mass From: Leah Zieber <leah.zieber@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 12:11:02 -0500 X-Message-Number: 2

Hi all=20 Going to be in Lowell mass for a few hours if play time. Besides ATHM and t= he New England quilt museum... What else is there to see quilt related?=20

Sent from Leah's iPhone=

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: December 09, 2013 From: Julie Silber <silber.julieellen@gmail.com> Date: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 10:16:22 -0800 X-Message-Number: 3

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I received an email notice today from The Book Depository that my copy of "Colouring the Nation" has been "dispatched."

It was $23.27 with free shipping (maybe it was $27.23). I took the suggestion from our own Jan Thomas -- thank you!

We'll see if it really comes ~ but you might want to check it out.

Julie

--e89a8f2356df1a041d04ed321c49--

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: December 09, 2013 From: "Janet O'Dell" <janet6139@gmail.com> Date: Wed, 11 Dec 2013 08:44:39 +1100 X-Message-Number: 4

Same here Julie - it cost me AUD 26.73 from The Book Depository. According to the blurb it will not be released until 7th April 2014 ;-)

Janet O'Dell Melbourne Australia

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Subject: Fw: Re: qhl digest: December 09, 2013 From: <parsnips1@verizon.net> Date: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 20:35:27 -0500 X-Message-Number: 5

I've been buying from this store through ABE for awhile now. They have excellent prices and ship very quickly. Smaller items seem to be sent using the 1st class equivalent of Royal Mail (I love getting "Royal Mail", lol) and have received things in around 4 days. A very large, heavy book took 8 or 9 days, but there might have been a holiday in there. I also received a shipping notification shortly after I ordered Coloring the Nation.

Pat Roth in snowy, icy S. NJ > >>I received an email notice today from The Book Depository >> that my copy of "Colouring the Nation" has been "dispatched."

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Subject: Old Country Store closed From: Barb Garrett <bgarrett421@comcast.net> Date: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 22:28:19 -0500 X-Message-Number: 6

Good Evening All --

I thought those who like to do fabric shopping when they visit Lancaster county would want to know about the closing of Old Country Store in Intercourse, to make your trip planning easier.

I don't know any more than what this newspaper article says. The closing will be a huge loss to the community, as many cottage industries (quilts, etc) sold their products through the store. There has been no mention of how they will liquidate inventory.

http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/929944_Intercourse-based-Good-Enterprises-closes-to-pursue-bankruptcy-liquidation-.html

This was the first store in my area that carried quiltmaking information. They also used to mount fantastic exhibits of antique quilts each year. And they've published some excellent books featuring antique quilts.

Wishing you all a good eveing, From snowy southeastern PA, Barb Garrett

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Subject: Re: Old Country Store closed From: Lynne Bassett <lynne@lynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Tue, 10 Dec 2013 22:31:03 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Oh no, what a shame!!

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Subject: Advice on an oil on canvas painting? From: Stephanie Whitson Higgins <authorsgw@msn.com> Date: Wed, 11 Dec 2013 19:13:06 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

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A= A= A= Because we have a few museum curators on the loop=2C and because I'm comple= tely ignorant of what to do=2C I'm posting this here. Also because the things I have tried haven't resulted in anything but form = letters or nothing.

I have been sorting art that we own but don't currently have hung in our ho= me and doing some minimal research on the internet regarding signatures & e= tc. Estate planning and all that. One of the pieces is an oil on canvas by = an American impressionist named Edgar Payne. Apparently there may be some s= erious value to some of his work.=20 Can anyone on the loop guide me as to how to go about having it evaluated? = At the very least we should have it appraised as part of our estate plannin= g ... right? What guidelines do I use to locate a reliable appraiser? Does = anyone know anything about where to go to ask question regarding the fact t= hat I think the piece needs to be cleaned? I'm basing this on viewing other= Payne work on the internet. The subject is a common one for him (the Calif= ornia Sierras) so I see comparable works ... and I'm fairly certain ours ne= eds cleaning. My husband tells me that the original owners were smokers=2C = so that could explain it. This is such an august group I'm hoping someone can give me advice. I'm clu= eless about fine art and apparently Edgar Payne works are considered in tha= t category. Thanks in advance.Stephanie WhitsonA= =

--_c70b4fe2-dcee-47bb-9b81-1de27639949e_--

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Subject: Re: Advice on an oil on canvas painting? From: Dana Balsamo <danabalsamo@yahoo.com> Date: Wed, 11 Dec 2013 17:38:38 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 3

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Hi Stephanie,ADefinitely seek a fine artsappraiser. Many auction ho= uses will offer an appraisal day once a month. I could help you with ref= errals in NJ or PA. AMy best,ADan

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Subject: Re: Advice on an oil on canvas painting? From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts@yahoo.com>

The market for Edgar Payne is definitely in CA.Contact auction hou= ses there like Butterfield's I think is the name; google CA or Los Angeles = auction house names, contact also Christie's or Sotheby's to see if they if= they have west coast sales, also contact Heritage Auction.Could b= e worth many thousands.Don't do anything to it til they advise a cons= ervator to bring it to, if that. You don't want to skin it and devalue it.= Take many photos, including signature on front, and also the ba= ck to show if the stretcher, etc. is original, also will reveal any restora= tion.Congrats. Do make same presentation to several auction houses= to compare their responses, then go with the one that estimates it best fo= r you.ALaura Fisher's AFISHER HERITAGE A305 East 61st Street= , New York NY 10065 cell: 917 /797-1260; tel: 212/ 838-2596 Aemail:= fisherheritage@yahoo.com web: www.laurafisherquilts.com Afacebook:= Laura Fisher QuiltsA>________________________________A I ----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Advice on an oil on canvas painting? From: Judy Schwender <sister3603@yahoo.com>

Hi Stephanie,AYour best choice for selecting a conservator is AIC. Thi= s is the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Wo= rks. You can do a search. Here is the url: http://www.conservation-us= .org/.AJudy Schwender

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Subject: Edgar Payne From: Donald Beld <donbeld@pacbell.net>

There is an Edgar Payne gallery that will assist with authentication and ap= praisals. Go to http://www.edgarpaynegallery.com/nd fill out the app= ropriate information. Good luck. As I am sure you know, this could be= worth a lot of money.In California, the best Auction House is Sot= herby's. best, Don Beld --943787736-1191166377-1386870790=:88884--

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Subject: slightly off topic From: Andi <areynolds220@comcast.net> Date: Thu, 12 Dec 2013 13:00:29 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

At the end of an article on how some companies are giving their employees shopping sprees instead of year-end bonuses was this:

No matter how well shoppers prepare, odd items find their way into the cart. Ms. Caruthers accidentally picked up a cow tongue that she mistook for "some kind of pot roast" as she ran through Winn-Dixie. RetailMeNot's Ms. Ezadi also ended up with a white elephant. "Apparently, we got a sewing machine," she says. It is still sitting, unopened, in her closet.

As my husband and I would say to one another, yet another sign that the apocalypse is upon us.

Andi in Paducah

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Subject: Re: Advice on an oil on canvas painting? From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooney@moonware.net> Date: Thu, 12 Dec 2013 11:57:19 -0800 X-Message-Number: 4

Good morning, QHLers - A few tips for using the free online conservator referral webpage that Judy mentioned below: Click on "Find A = Conservator" on the home page. Then click on the =93Advance Search=94 button in order to = refine your initial search more closely, selecting "Paintings" under the 'Type = of Conservation'. You will get the largest number of responses when you = enter the zip code for the area of the painting location by entering the = largest number of miles. Depending on the size of the painting and the size of = your vehicle, it might be safer for the painting if the conservator comes to = the painting. Oh, and don't believe ANY estimates for conservation treatment from any appraisers you've seen on Antiques Roadshow - they are = appraisers, not conservators, and so should not be giving any estimates for = conservation treatment. <getting off her soapbox now> Regards, =20 Meg =20 . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________ =20 Margaret E. Geiss-Mooney =20 Textile/Costume Conservator & =20 Collections Management Consultant =20 Professional Associate - AIC =20 707-763-8694 =20 mgmooney@moonware.net =20

..best choice for selecting a conservator is AIC. This is the = American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works. You can do = a search. Here is the url: http://www.conservation-us.org/.

..oil on canvas by an American impressionist named Edgar Payne. = Apparently there may be some serious value to some of his work.=20 Can anyone on the loop guide me as to how to go about having it = evaluated? At the very least we should have it appraised as part of our estate = planning ... right? What guidelines do I use to locate a reliable appraiser? Does anyone know anything about where to go to ask question regarding the = fact that I think the piece needs to be cleaned? I'm basing this on viewing = other Payne work on the internet. The subject is a common one for him (the California Sierras) so I see comparable works ... and I'm fairly certain ours needs cleaning. My husband tells me that the original owners were smokers, so that could explain it....

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Subject: Art work advice ... thank you From: Stephanie Whitson Higgins <authorsgw@msn.com> Date: Thu, 12 Dec 2013 16:07:37 -0600 X-Message-Number: 5

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I've received an abundance of knowledgeable insight from several of you=2C = and I wantto express my heartfelt thanks. I feel much better prepared to ma= ke a thoughtful planas to how to proceed.=20 I know this was off topic and I truly do appreciate your patience and advic= e. For those who responded to me privately=2C I'll let you know what happens= =2C but I won'tclutter the quilt history loop with further news regarding E= dgar Payne and Stephanie Whitson. =

--_98537bb2-962f-43c7-9263-bee375039c1c_--

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Subject: Re: Art work advice ... thank you From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts@yahoo.com> Date: Thu, 12 Dec 2013 14:49:39 -0800 (PST) X-Message-Number: 6

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just let us know the follow up -- where you auction, and what it sells for!= LaurALaura Fisher's AFISHER HERITAGE A305 East 61st Stre= et, New York NY 10065 cell: 917 /797-1260; tel: 212/ 838-2596 Aemai= l: fisherheritage@yahoo.com web: www.laurafisherquilts.com Afaceboo= k: Laura Fisher QuiltsA>________________________________

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: December 11, 2013 From: caryl schuetz <carylschuetz@yahoo.com>

We have had our oil canvases appraised by the appraiser at the art museum i= n our city. That way we are able to insure them as well as include them = in our estate--

------------------------------------------------------------------= ----A>A>Subject: Re: Advice on an oil on canvas painting?A>From: Laur= a Fisher <laurafisherquilts@yahoo.com>A>Date: Wed, 11 Dec 2013 18:16:57 -= 0800 (PST)A>X-Message-Number: 4A>A>--1389141485-561529414-1386814617= =3D:6312A>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=3Diso-8859-1A>Content-Trans= fer-Encoding: quoted-printableA>A>The market for Edgar Payne is definit= ely in CA.Contact auction houses there like Butterfie= ld's I think is the name; google CA or Los Angeles auction house nam= es, contact also Christie's or Sotheby's to see if they ifthey have = west coast sales, also contact Heritage Auction.Could b=3D= A>e worth many thousands.Don't do anything to it til they advis= e a conservator to bring it to, if that. You don't want to skin it a= nd devalue it.Take many photos, including signature = on front, and also the back to show if the stretcher, etc. is o= riginal, also will reveal any restoration.Congrats. D= o make same presentation to several auction housesto compare their r= esponses, then go with the one that estimates it best for you.= Laura Fisher's FISHER HERITAGE 305 East 61st Stree= t, New York NY 10065 cell: 917 /797-1260; tel: 212/ 838-25= 96 email:fisherheritage@yahoo.com web: www.laurafishe= rquilts.com facebook:Laura Fisher Quilts>_______= _________________________> From: Stephanie Whitson Higgins <aut= horsgw@msn.com>>To: Quilt History List <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.= com> >Sent: Wednesday, December 11, 2013 8:13 PM>Subject: = [qhl] Advice on an oil on canvas painting?> >>>>= >Because we have a few museum curators on the loop, and because= I'm completely ignorant of what to do, I'm posting this here.>= Also because the things I have tried haven't resulted in anything bu= t form letters or nothing.>>I have been sorting art that w= e own but don't currently have hung in our home and doing some minim= al research on the internet regarding signatures & etc. Estate plann= ing and all that. One of the pieces is an oil on canvas by an Americ= an impressionist named Edgar Payne. Apparently there may be some ser= ious value to some of his work. >Can anyone on the loop guide me =3D= A>as to how to go about having it evaluated? At the very least we should = haveit appraised as part of our estate planning ... right? What guid= elines do I use to locate a reliable appraiser? Does anyone know any= thing about whereto go to ask question regarding the fact that I thi= nk the piece needs to be cleaned? I'm basing this on viewing other P= ayne work on the internet. Thesubject is a common one for him (the C= alifornia Sierras) so I see comparable works ... and I'm fairly cert= ain ours needs cleaning. My husband tells me that the original owner= s were smokers, so that could explain it.>This is such an augus= t group I'm hoping someone can give me advice. I'm cluelessabout fin= e art and apparently Edgar Payne works are considered in that catego= ry.>Thanks in advance.Stephanie Whitson> =3DA=

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Subject: Re: Advice on an oil on canvas painting? From: tquilts@mac.com Date: Wed, 11 Dec 2013 19:23:44 -0600 X-Message-Number: 1

Hi Stephanie, There are 2 certified art appraisers in town:

Judy Nelson, ISA CAPP 817-763-5435

Pam Campbell, ISA CAPP 817-737-9566

Either one of these would be able to help you with your questions and appraise it if you need that. We are all members of the International Society of Appraisers, and you can also go to the website isa-appraisers.org, for more information. Sounds like a nice piece!

Terri Ellis ISA CAPP mistletoesales.net tquilts@mac.com

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Subject: Re: Advice on an oil on canvas painting? From: tquilts@mac.com Date: Wed, 11 Dec 2013 19:25:24 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

I just realized that this was from QHL - I thought it was from my neighborhood! So disregard the information about appraisers in town, and just look on the ISA website for a fine art appraiser in your area. Sorry! Terri Ellis ISA CAPP mistletoesales.net tquilts@mac.com

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Subject: Re: Advice on an oil on canvas painting? From: Lynne Bassett <lynne@lynnezwoolsey.com> Date: Wed, 11 Dec 2013 21:37:35 -0500 X-Message-Number: 3

Stephanie, I don't know where you are, but I suggest that you contact the nearest art museum for the name of a trained conservator and an appraiser. You can also contact the Appraisers Association of America for help: http://www.appraisersassoc.org/. Also the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works: http://www.conservation-us.org/

Good luck!

All best, Lynne Bassett

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Subject: Re: Fw: Re: qhl digest: December 09, 2013 From: JLHfw@aol.com " Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Colouring the Nation is available in the US on Amazon for $23.50. Janet H in Fort Worth

In a message dated 12/10/2013 7:36:03 P.M. Central Standard Time, parsnips1@verizon.net writes:

I've been buying from this store through ABE for awhile now. They have excellent prices and ship very quickly. Smaller items seem to be sent using the 1st class equivalent of Royal Mail (I love getting "Royal Mail", lol) and have received things in around 4 days. A very large, heavy book took 8 or 9 days, but there might have been a holiday in there. I also received a shipping notification shortly after I ordered Coloring the Nation.

Pat Roth in snowy, icy S. NJ > >>I received an email notice today from The Book Depository >> that my copy of "Colouring the Nation" has been "dispatched."

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Subject: Re: art appraisers From: Judy Schwender <sister3603@yahoo.com>

I confess that I am puzzled by this reply. It is unethical for museum st= aff to appraise a potential donation. Best practices are that museum sta= ff do not appraise at all. We hold an Appraisal Day here at our museum f= or the public where the appraisals are conducted by an AQS Certified Quilt = Appraiser who is not a museum staff member. Maybe this type of situation= is what Caryl meant?When I am asked to recommend a quiltapprai= ser, I provide a list of at least three, and I also refer the person to the= search section on the AQS website: http://www.americanquilter.com/quilt_wo= rld/appraisers.php. I should imagine there is a similar service for fine= art appraisers. An art museum should be able to provide you with guidan= ce.I should note that a good reason that curators are not the best= folks to appraise your art is that they don't keep up with the market. = Appraising demands a lot of research in market values.Staying on top = of all that takes more time than a curator has!Judy SchwenderA= From: caryl schuetz <carylschuetz@yahoo.com>ATo: Qui= lt History List <qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com> ASent: Thursday, December 12= , 2013 7:07 PMASubject: [qhl] Re: qhl digest: December 11, 2013AW= e have had our oil canvases appraised by the appraiser at the art museum in= our city. That way we are able to insure them as well as include them i= n our estate planning.ACarylA>________________________________A>A>C= aryl SchuetzA>Professional Association of Appraisers - Quilted Textiles= A>Certified by the American Quilter's SocietyA>www.quiltvalues.com= A>Home of Fabulous Tee Shirt QuiltsA>Blogs: http://aboutquilts.wordpres= s.com/ A> http://woodh= avenstudio.wordpress.com/A>A --1344379368-1135102104-1386950686=:57366--

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Subject: book that may be of interest From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com>

Passing this along in case you are not aware:

"Out of Whole Cloth" by Joyce Cauthen is a profile of quilter and National Heritage Fellow Bettye Kimbrell. The book, based on many interviews, is in first person and tells Bettye's story from her rural Fayette County beginnings to the national recognition of her amazing quilting skill. The book is enhanced with a website that presents more photos of her quilting.

From years of recorded interviews with Bettye Kimbrell, acclaimed Alabama quilter and National Heritage Fellow (2008), Cauthen shaped an absorbing narrative of a woman--abandoned by her mother when she was 8 years old, married when she was 13, a mother at 14--whose sole aim in life was to create "out of whole cloth" a good life for the five children she had with her charming but unfaithful husband. Bettye, born in 1936, describes in vivid detail her life on tenant farms in rural Fayette County and her move as a young mother to Mt. Olive in Jefferson County where she focused on creating a secure home for her children. In the second half of the book, she recounts her development as a quilter. Reviewer Alan Jabbour writes, "If quiet suffering while managing life's vicissitudes dominates her early decades, quiet achievement, growing self-confidence, and public acclaim come to dominate the later decades. As her life shaped her art, simultaneously her art reshaped her life."

Joyce Cauthen, Executive Director Emeritus of the Alabama Folklife Association, has recently published a book, "Out of Whole Cloth: The Life of Bettye Kimbrell," and a companion website at www.outofwholecloth.com. The book is available at Amazon.com as a paperback and e-book.

Candace KIntzer Perry

Curator of Collections

Schwenkfelder Library & Heritage Center

105 Seminary Street

Pennsburg, PA 18073

www.schwenkfelder.com

215-679-3103

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Subject: Re Cradles From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieber@verizon.net>

Hi to all - I wonder if anyone can recommend a reference for doll cradles. I picked up a small cradle and would like to be able to date it... It came with a quilt from c1830's and I am not sure if the cradle is of the same era... how does one tell? (The seller said the quilt was from the 1920s and said it came from the same PA estate as the cradle though they did not say what estate. They did not typically deal in antique textiles and were quite off in their dating of the doll quilt.) Any reference material would be appreciated.

Thank you

Leah A. Zieber

Zieber Quilts

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Subject: Western Washington Quilt Study Group From: Karen Alexander <karenquilt@rockisland.com> Date: Thu, 19 Dec 2013 14:08:05 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

What's in a name? Maybe it will simply become the Washington Quilt Study Group. However, we are using its original name for the time being.

Our first meeting was Oct 20 just south of Tacoma. We have just posted about 1/2 of the photos up on our new blog. Please stop by when you have a minute....maybe after Dec 25 when you are just dying for a quilt break!

http://wwqsg.blogspot.com/2013/12/bed-turning-eclectic-mix.html

At the end of the blog there are announcements about future meetings, including the Quilt History Retreat to be held on Lopez Island May 15-18.

If you are interested in attending the Retreat, please contact Karen at karenquilt@gmail.com.

Karen Alexander Susan Underwood Joy Neal

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Subject: Book on indigo From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <pnhahn01@comcast.net> Date: Fri, 20 Dec 2013 16:50:05 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 1

In today's Beaufort, SC's "Beaufort Gazette." my morning local paper, was an interesting article on "Red, White and Black Make Blue," by Andrea Feeser of Clemson Univ. I was not familiar with this before, I think it is a fairly recent release. It tells about the indigo importance as a dye and its place in South Carolina history. I see it is available on Amazon. I shall have to add it to my list of "got to order."

The title, according to the article, refers to the plantations owned by the white colonists and the use of both African American and Native American enslaved laborers to produce the crop. The article also describes the dying process that the author used where a garment came out of the dye vat a greenish-yellow and as oxygen made its way into the fibers, the color transformation took place.

I had thought that coming to the South Carolina Sea Islands, I would find indigo fabric stores on every corner of Main Street Beaufort to bulk up my quilt fabric supply stash. Ha! Little did I know the almost non-existence of current indigo dyers and the intricate process it entailed. The one dyer I did find, at the Penn Center Heritage site, a young man from western Africa, helped me understand a bit more of the process. The fabric he produced, he sold in a few local Gullah art shops for $45 a half yard. He has since left the area.

After our fabulous AQSG seminar in Charleston where many finally got to experience the South Carolina Lowcountry, and, Xenia's recent article in Blanket Statements about Eliza Pinckney and indigo production, I thought this book may be of interest. I'm going to try and check out our local bookshops today.

Nancy Hahn, Dataw Island, South Carolina

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Subject: Re: qhl digest: December 20, 2013 From: ThreadDog@aol.com

Jim Liles was a treasured member of the infamous Thursday Bee in Knoxville that met at Eve Earle Kent's Quilt Craft. Jim's avocation was traditionally dyed textiles, and he loved lecturing to the other members on that subject, and many other things. When we actually did some indigo dying with him, he passed this along to us.

I hope you blue lovers enjoy this, and have a Merry Christmas.

"Sky Fills the Heart" comes from a Liberian folk tale about the discovery of indigo.

"The sky did more for man in those days than to shade him and house the spirits. Bits of sky could be eaten. This was different than other food. Rice and palm oil filled the belly. Sky fills the heart. With a scrap of cloud inside him, a person can float and dream and find again the peaceful, joyous feelings that filled him before High God left the earth.

It is dangerous business, this eating of cloud. One had to come to cloud-food pure in thought and body. Even so, one could become cloud-drunk, sweetly drunk and unknowing..

Witnessing the human grief and tragedy brought on by imperfect cloud-eating "High God....let women have the secret of blue for their clothes (and) pulled sky up higher where no one could reach up to break off a piece for food. People look on the blue of fine cloth and have less need of near sky."

Esther Warner Dendel, "Blue goes for down: How indigo dye came to Liberia----a folk tale

Threaddog, aka Linda CLAUSsen

In a message dated 12/21/2013 2:06:36 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, qhl@lyris.quiltropolis.com writes:

QHL Digest for Friday, December 20, 2013.

1. Book on indigo

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Subject: Book on indigo From: Paul and Nancy Hahn <pnhahn01@comcast.net> Date: Fri, 20 Dec 2013 16:50:05 +0000 (UTC) X-Message-Number: 1

In today's Beaufort, SC's "Beaufort Gazette." my morning local paper, was an interesting article on "Red, White and Black Make Blue," by Andrea Feeser of Clemson Univ. I was not familiar with this before, I think it is a fairly recent release. It tells about the indigo importance as a dye and its place in South Carolina history. I see it is available on Amazon. I shall have to add it to my list of "got to order."

The title, according to the article, refers to the plantations owned by the white colonists and the use of both African American and Native American enslaved laborers to produce the crop. The article also describes the dying process that the author used where a garment came out of the dye vat a greenish-yellow and as oxygen made its way into the fibers, the color transformation took place.

I had thought that coming to the South Carolina Sea Islands, I would find indigo fabric stores on every corner of Main Street Beaufort to bulk up my quilt fabric supply stash. Ha! Little did I know the almost non-existence of current indigo dyers and the intricate process it entailed. The one dyer I did find, at the Penn Center Heritage site, a young man from western Africa, helped me understand a bit more of the process. The fabric he produced, he sold in a few local Gullah art shops for $45 a half yard. He has since left the area.

After our fabulous AQSG seminar in Charleston where many finally got to experience the South Carolina Lowcountry, and, Xenia's recent article in Blanket Statements about Eliza Pinckney and indigo production, I thought this book may be of interest. I'm going to try and check out our local bookshops today.

Nancy Hahn, Dataw Island, South Carolina

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Subject: Indigo From: "Gale Slagle" <glslag@cox.net> Date: Thu, 26 Dec 2013 19:55:47 -0800 X-Message-Number: 1

Last year while in Portland we went to Powell's book store. I picked up a book titled "Indigo: in search of the color that seduced the world" by Catherine E. McKinley (2011). I haven't read it... to many other books to read. But from the summary it looks interesting.

Also at one of the recent Repiecers (So. CA quilt history group) one of the members shared a book called "The Art of Dyeing: in the history of mankind" by Franco Brunello (1973). This is 400 pages plus prints of great information all packed in one book! I just found one on ebay that didn't cost as much as those on Amazon, very excited to have my own copy =)

If you are in the So. CA area Repiecers now meets every month on the second Saturday of the month at at The Quilt Cupboard 11891 Valley View Garden Grove, CA 92845

from 10 am - about 2 pm Our next meeting will be January 11, 2014

At the December Repiecers meeting we studied Red and Green quilts. Members shared some excellent examples of both pieced and appliqu├ęd red and green quilts.

The Repiecers website will be updated soon, after the holidays, when the house returns to a more normal state. http://www.repiecers.com/

Happy New Year! -- Gale

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Subject: Some Christmas Quilting News from December 27, 1897 From: suereich@charter.net Date: Fri, 27 Dec 2013 19:31:17 -0500 (EST) X-Message-Number: 1

------=_Part_1100856_193032690.1388190677196 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8; format=flowed Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Content-Disposition: inline

New Haven Register New Haven, Connecticut December 27, 1897, page 3

HER CHRISTMAS QUILT. Bedford, N.Y., Dec. 27--On Christmas Day, thirty years ago, Mrs. Thomas A. Mead, of the village, started to make a crazy quilt. Although she has devoted some time to it almost every day, the quilt was not completed till Christmas, 1897. This is not because the quilt is so large. It is of ordinary size. But the quilt represents the sewing together of 6,130 tiny pieces. Few of the pieces are of exactly the same shade of color and none of the same pattern. Mrs. Mead began the construction of the complicated piece of patchwork in her ante-matrimonial days. She has in it a bit of the gowns of almost every woman and girl in Bedford. The crazy quilt has long enjoyed public considera- tion, and now that it is completed, hun- dreds have come to the Mead home. Yielding to pressure, Mrs. Mead will al- low the quilt to be offered to the highest bidder at a fair soon to be held under the auspices of the Methodist Church here.

Sue Reich Washington Depot, Connecticut web sites: suereichquilts.com go to http://tinyurl.com/7ustpd8 www.coveringquilthistory go to http://tinyurl.com/878berh www.majorreichaward go to http://tinyurl.com/6wc66p5

------=_Part_1100856_193032690.1388190677196--

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Subject: Christmas Quilt news! From: Leah Zieber <leah.zieber@verizon.net> Date: Fri, 27 Dec 2013 22:07:27 -0800 X-Message-Number: 2

Golly Sue... No picture!!! Leaves a gal to wonder!!! Love the article... And so I wonder... Since no two pieces were the same cou= ld this be considered a "charm quilt?" And if so, do you suppose it may hav= e been a hexagon or other shape and not what we now think of as a "crazy" qu= ilt? Just imagining 30 years of piecing a single quilt with that many pieces. Ove= r 6k!!! Multitudinous to say the least! Thanks for sharing! Leah... who is off to read her new book on Turkey Red!!!!

Sent from Leah's iPhone=

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Subject: RE: Some Christmas Quilting News from December 27, 1897 From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton@comcast.net> Date: Sat, 28 Dec 2013 08:06:11 -0600 X-Message-Number: 3

Wow. Thirty years of work and she is pressured to donate it! I wish we = knew what it brought. Or maybe we don=E2=80=99t want to know! As Leah = said, wish we could see it. 1867 would be a bit early for what we think = of as 'crazy' quilts today but they did use that term. 'Pattern' could = mean print which means it could even be squares put together. Different = colors and different prints. I can't think how anyone could count pieces in what we consider a crazy = quilt. jean

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Subject: Christmas Quilting News from December 27, 1897 From: Neva Hart <nevahart@verizon.net> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2013 08:20:43 -0500 X-Message-Number: 1

Because I get QHL digest, I may be behind the responses on this topic - Jean/Leigh, the quilt from Sue=92s article (1897) was made during the = time period when silk was readily available =97 therefore, wonder if the = referenced =93gowns=94 would have been predominantly from silk rather = than cotton. Clothing styles at the end of the 19th century were getting = away from being the =93gowns=94 that come to mind. So if out of style, = the fabric could have been gladly given up for the very popular = quilt/parlor throw.

Sue=92s collection of news items probably would reveal when the use of = =93charm=94 was popular. Flattery is so persuasive =97 smile =97 she = succumbed.

Off to read more in =93Interwoven=94 which gives such excellent = background on why certain designs were used on fabrics through the = centuries. The scholarly exhibit/book put so much info into perspective.

Neva Hart in Virginia

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Subject: RE: Christmas Quilting News from December 27, 1897 From: "Jean Carlton" <jeancarlton@comcast.net> Date: Sun, 29 Dec 2013 13:01:58 -0600 X-Message-Number: 2

But wasn't the article a report on 30 yrs previous - hence 1860's? Jean

Sue's article (1897) was made during the time > period when silk was readily available - therefore, wonder if the referenced > "gowns" would have been predominantly from silk rather than cotton. > Clothing styles at the end of the 19th century were getting away from being > the "gowns" that come to mind.

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Subject: Re: Indigo From: JLHfw@aol.com

The Art of Dyeing is available on Alibris for $17.00 plus $4.00 shipping if=

you are interested in buying this book. Janet H in cold Fort Worth

In a message dated 12/27/2013 11:24:23 A.M. Central Standard Time, glslagcox.net writes:

Last year while in Portland we went to Powell's book store. I picked up a=

book titled "Indigo: in search of the color that seduced the world" by Catherine E. McKinley (2011). I haven't read it... to many other books to read. But=

from the summary it looks interesting.

Also at one of the recent Repiecers (So. CA quilt history group) one of the members shared a book called "The Art of Dyeing: in the history of mankind" by Franco Brunello (1973). This is 400 pages plus prints of great information all packed in one book! I just found one on ebay that didn't=

cost as much as those on Amazon, very excited to have my own copy =3D)

If you are in the So. CA area Repiecers now meets every month on the second Saturday of the month at at The Quilt Cupboard 11891 Valley View Garden Grove, CA 92845

from 10 am - about 2 pm Our next meeting will be January 11, 2014

At the December Repiecers meeting we studied Red and Green quilts. Members shared some excellent examples of both pieced and appliqu=E9d red and gree= n quilts.

The Repiecers website will be updated soon, after the holidays, when the=

house returns to a more normal state. http://www.repiecers.com/

Happy New Year! -- Gale

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Subject: RE: Some Christmas Quilting News from December 27, 1897 From: Stephanie Whitson Higgins <authorsgwmsn.com>

It might be interesting to further research about the crazy quilt by trying= to see if Methodist Church records could be found regarding the bazr or = event where the quilt was sold or raffled off. Perhaps ladies' aid society = minutes would yield more information ... of course there's another bunny tr= ail to follow but it surely is intriguing because of all the questions rais= ed by the article about a "crazy quilt" being begun on Christmas Day of 186= 7. Stephanie Whitson =

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Subject: RE: Some Christmas Quilting News from December 27, 1897 From: Donald Beld <donbeldpacbell.net> Date: Mon, 30 Dec 2013 11:34:38 -0800 (PST)

just to throw in my two cents: I doubt the quilt pattern was called a "c= razy" quilt in 1867--the newspaper article from 1897 refers to it as a "cra= zy" quilt--a quilting style that was one of the "crazes" in quilting at tha= t time. It was used to give people some idea of what the quilt looked li= ke. Just a thought, Don Beld ____________________________= _