Subject: Workt By Hand Exhibit at the National Museum of Women in the Arts
From: Jo Major Ciolino <joanniemaj@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 14 Feb 2014 15:58:21 -0500

If you are able to dig out and go, the National Museum of Women in the Arts
has the exhibit, "Workt by Hand: Hidden Labor and Historical Quilts" on
view through April, 2014. About the show: "This unique exhibit examines
quilts through the lens of contemporary feminist theory. Revealing this
medium's shifting cultural status, the exhibition explores issues of
anonymity versus authorship and fine art versus craft." I'm especially
pleased to note they are featuring the DVD documentary "Why Quilts Matter"
as part of the exhibit. It's a tremendous honor and a wonderful exhibit.
More info can be found on the web: http://goo.gl/Z9NuCc.
Joan C.
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Darts of Death
From: "Larry Wohlgemuth" <larryw@greenhills.net>
Date: Mon, 17 Feb 2014 14:20:41 -0600
X-Message-Number: 1

Hi Teddy,

Would you share a link to the darts of death quilt please. I can't seem to
find it. I just looked thru your galleries, they are such fun. I remember
seeing some of them in the magazines. Thanks,

Sherrie Wohlgemuth
Missouri

-----Original Message-----
From: Teddy Pruett [mailto:aprayzer@hotmail.com]
Sent: Thursday, February 13, 2014 10:19 AM
To: Quilt History List
Subject: [qhl] Darts of Death

I actually own a quilt from central Georgia done in black and mourning
prints. It is in a pattern called Darts of Death. More than 15 years ago
when I acquired the quilt, I looked up the pattern to find it was also
called Lost Children or Rockingham's Beauty. We were discussing this quilt
on FB not long ago and I was unable to defend the pattern names very well,
particularly Lost Children. The references were long gone.

Teddy Pruett
Busier than a thousand legged worm tying shoe strings

www.teddypruett.com----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Darts of Death
From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzer@hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 18 Feb 2014 10:32:00 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Sherrie I have some nice pics of the quilt to share but I must plead =
ignorance to posting photos on the board. I belong to the Vintage and Anti=
que Quilts list on FB primarily for the 'real time' conversations and th=
e ease of posting photos. If you are on that list I can post there. I =
can post it on my FB page and anyone interested can see it there. Or so=
meone can coach me in posting to the board.
For now I'll put it on my FB page. Let me know if that's sufficient. =20

Teddy Pruett=20
Busier than a thousand legged worm tying shoe strings

www.teddypruett.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Darts of Death Quilt
From: Virginia Berger <va_berger@hotmail.com>
Date: Wed, 19 Feb 2014 07:30:49 -0600
X-Message-Number: 1

--_74b442c6-4487-45a4-b20d-ca300dd03615_
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

I've posted Teddy's picture of her Darts of Death quilt on the eboard for t=
hose who don't have Facebook access.
=20

> Subject: Darts of Death
> From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzer@hotmail.com>
> Date: Tue 18 Feb 2014 10:32:00 -0500

> Sherrie I have some nice pics of the quilt to share but I must plead
> ignorance to posting photos on the board. I belong to the Vintage and An=
tique Quilts list on FB primarily for the 'real time' conversations and the=
ease of posting photos. If you are on that list I can post there. =20
=

--_74b442c6-4487-45a4-b20d-ca300dd03615_--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Darts of Death Quilt
From: Sally Ward <sallytatters@fastmail.co.uk>
Date: Wed, 19 Feb 2014 14:37:49 +0000
X-Message-Number: 2

Well now, thanks for posting Teddy's picture, Virginia. It was a =
revelation!

I have posted to eboard a picture from the American Museum at Bath =
catalogue, with what they call Darts of Death. =20

Coincidentally, today I got a reply from the curator to my query. The =
only little extra bit of information in her notes was that it was dated =
1860-1899 and collected (and presumed to be made) in New Jersey.

So, will the 'real' Darts of Death please stand up?!

Sally Ward=


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Darts of Death Quilt
From: "Kim Baird" <kbaird@cableone.net>
Date: Wed, 19 Feb 2014 09:50:53 -0600
X-Message-Number: 3

I think both quilt patterns have other names, more widely used. It must be
the black that evokes the reference to death.

Kim

-----Original Message-----
From: Sally Ward [mailto:sallytatters@fastmail.co.uk]
Sent: Wednesday, February 19, 2014 8:38 AM
To: Quilt History List
Subject: [qhl] Re: Darts of Death Quilt

Well now, thanks for posting Teddy's picture, Virginia. It was a
revelation!

I have posted to eboard a picture from the American Museum at Bath
catalogue, with what they call Darts of Death.

Coincidentally, today I got a reply from the curator to my query. The
only little extra bit of information in her notes was that it was dated
1860-1899 and collected (and presumed to be made) in New Jersey.

So, will the 'real' Darts of Death please stand up?!

Sally Ward

---
You are currently subscribed to qhl as: kbaird@cableone.net.
To unsubscribe send a blank email to
leave-qhl-1650237Y@lyris.quiltropolis.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Uncoverings for sale
From: "Mary Waller" <mwaller@vyn.midco.net>
Date: Wed, 19 Feb 2014 11:11:27 -0600

I'm starting some spring cleaning early, and have some copies of
"Uncoverings" ready for new homes.

$5.00 each, OR $20 for all five, plus postage (U.S. addresses only, please).
Each volume weighs about a pound.



Volume 1, 1980

Volume 18, 1997

Volume 25, 2004

Volume 26, 2005

Volume 27, 2006

Mary Waller

Vermillion, South Dakota, USA


------=_NextPart_000_0028_01CF2D63.56C70710--


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Uncoverings for sale have all been spoken for
From: "Mary Waller" <mwaller@vyn.midco.net>
Date: Wed, 19 Feb 2014 15:46:55 -0600
X-Message-Number: 5

This is a multipart message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_0057_01CF2D89.D247E410
Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

All five copies of "Uncoverings" have been spoken for. Thanks so much!



Mary Waller
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Uncoverings for sale have all been spoken for
From: Getfruit@aol.com
Date: Thu, 20 Feb 2014 12:19:37 -0500 (EST)
X-Message-Number: 1

--part1_811ae.604f3c0f.40379329_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Sorry I missed them. I was getting ready to respond when the power went
out and I didn't have a phone number.

Violet Vaughnes


In a message dated 2/19/2014 2:04:05 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
mwaller@vyn.midco.net writes:

All five copies of "Uncoverings" have been spoken for. Thanks so much!



Mary Waller



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Restoring old quilts
From: Kris Driessen <krisdriessen@yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 21 Feb 2014 15:57:38 -0800 (PST)
X-Message-Number: 1

==Catherine Litwinow is having trouble posting.=A0 She has a question f=
or the group:==" How bad must a quilt be "not" to be saved?"==Cathe=
rine




----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Restoring old quilts
From: "Dr. Elizabeth A Richards" <elizabeth.richards@ualberta.ca>
Date: Fri, 21 Feb 2014 21:33:58 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

My decisions regarding old quilts and restoration or conservation always
have a great deal of judgment in them. If I feel that it is going to be
so expensive to do the work that my client is going to resent my fees I
probably would not restore a quilt. If a quilt has a lot of weighted
silk and should not be on permanent display or used in a home, I try to
give some simple conservation options. Sometimes it is very hard for a
client to understand that inserting new or period fabrics does change
"the hand of the maker".

Having said that I remember a 1970's quilt that needed so much work I
sat down with the client and showed her how to do her own restoration
work. Her mother had made the quilt and was (slowly) coming to the end
of her life. The daughter had brought samples from her children' s
clothes (1990's) that she wanted put into the old quilt. I suggested
that she and her mother work on the quilt together and that they could
have a great time telling stories as they worked. This quilt that
probably had $1000 of stitching work needed. To me monetarily it wasn't
worth restoring, and I was very hesitant to undertake the work, but the
value to the daughter did not have to do with money. The daughter left
my studio very happy and last I heard from her, her mother was in
remission from her cancer and they hadn't started on the quilt.

Elizabeth Richards in Fernie, BC where it has snowed every day this week


--
Dr Elizabeth A Richards
elizabeth.richards@ualberta.ca


---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: restoration
From: Bettina Havig <bettinaqc@socket.net>
Date: Sat, 22 Feb 2014 08:08:57 -0600
X-Message-Number: 2

In my opinion...the real question balances on the difference between =
restoration and conservation. I favor conservation, that is stopping the =
damage and supporting the quilt.=20
Restoration should be undertaken only when minimal damage has to be =
dealt with. One criteria might be looking at the quilt in terms of =
percentage of damage; if not more that 5-10% is the case and if there is =
compelling reason to restore then go ahead. In most instances I would =
rather make a replica than do extensive restoration. Another question =
for me is whether the restorer can do the work with the same skill as =
the original. And, can comparable materials be found to make the =
restoration less or unnoticeable.=20

Bettina Havig



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: restoration
From: "Dr. Elizabeth A Richards" <elizabeth.richards@ualberta.ca>
Date: Sat, 22 Feb 2014 08:56:00 -0700
X-Message-Number: 3

I think Bettina Havig's opinion is excellent. I too favour conservation
but if a client/owner is determined that he/she is going to use the
quilt more extensive work may be necessary. In a museum there is never
a question of restoration but in private practice that is not always the
case.

The question of honouring "the hand of the maker" with careful work to
follow the skills of the original quilter takes skilled work and careful
decision making. It is much more difficult when the original quilter
did not have good quilting skills.

Making a replica is another excellent solution but you have to have
access to specialized materials. It's often common, even with quilt
lines of replication fabrics, that the new fabrics are of much better
quality than the old. Where I live in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada I know
very few quilters who make replication quilts. One exception is the
Scholarship group in the Edmonton Quilt Guild who made a replication
wool quilt for a raffle to support their undergraduate scholarship at
the University of Alberta. From a conservation perspective of honouring
"the hand of the maker" this quilt was sewn far better than the
original. The design and colours however, were the same.

Elizabeth Richards who is off skiing this morning.

--
Dr Elizabeth A Richards
elizabeth.richards@ualberta.ca


---
This email is free from viruses and malware because avast! Antivirus protection is active.
http://www.avast.com



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: Restoring old quilts
From: "Margaret Geiss-Mooney" <mgmooney@moonware.net>
Date: Sat, 22 Feb 2014 11:31:19 -0800
X-Message-Number: 4

The classic conservator's answer: "It all depends". (you knew I was going to
say that, right?).

It is a combination of the current physical condition of the quilt (all of
its components - top, batting, backing) AND the wishes and expectations of
the owner. If the quilt needs to be cleaned, this can add another level of
complication. Practically, it also depends on the size of the owner's bank
account if the owner has to pay someone to do the work.

I am a big fan of what I call "cooperative conservation" where I educate the
owner to what is possible for the quilt based on its current physical
condition, the kinds of materials and supplies that are appropriate (and
where to find them) and then the owner does the work itself.

Please feel free to contact me off-list if further clarification is needed
or if there are further questions.
Regards,
Meg
. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________
Margaret E. Geiss-Mooney
Textile/Costume Conservator &
Collections Management Consultant
Professional Associate - AIC
707-763-8694
mgmooney@moonware.net

" How bad must a quilt be "not" to be saved?"





----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: qhl digest: February 21, 2014
From: Teddy Pruett <aprayzer@hotmail.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Feb 2014 18:30:20 -0500
X-Message-Number: 5

--_22f91972-9001-4ed0-b454-d066e8681a65_
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

<<<How bad must a quilt be "not" to be saved?"=3D=3DCathe=3D> rine>>>

I'd say that if the question arises the answer is that it is already too=
far gone.

Teddy Pruett
Busier than a thousand legged worm tying shoe strings

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: restoration
From: "Linda Heminway" <ibquiltn@comcast.net>
Date: Sun, 23 Feb 2014 07:03:35 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

Just thought I would share my experience in restoring one very special
quilt. My cousin had a quilt that was made for her when she was a small
child by our grandmother. She was one of the "earlier" grandchildren that
got a quilt and by the time I came along, grandma was older and I was the
2nd to last of 19 grandchildren.
My cousin knew I was a quilter and asked me and, of course, I said yes. I
said yes (big mistake) before I even saw that quilt. I love my cousin and I
loved my grandmother, so it was a "no brainer", right? Well, yes and no.
This quit was a Dresden Plate quilt. I should have followed the advice of
someone who wrote on this topic and made her a replica of this quilt and
maybe cut some of this quit that was salvageable and made her a pillow out
of it or a small wall hanging.
At any rate, the sashing was torn and ragged and it had a ruffle on the
outside of it at one time. What was left of that ruffle was rags, truly.
There wasn't a single block on that quilt that didn't need 1930s/40s fabric
replaced or re-sewn in place. Some of the blocks were in tatters and others
were a bit nicer, perhaps the ones that were in the sun at the end of the
bed had the most damage? Whatever it was, it was bad. I would guess that
about 55% of the quilt was intact, at best. It wasn't the only thing I
worked on, but it took me two years to basically re-build that quilt.
Re-building is harder than creating a new quilt, I learned that pretty
quickly. I appliqued new repro fabric over top of the frayed pieces and I
also completely replaced the sashing and was lucky to match the color
exactly. One thing was very difficult for me is that my hand buttonhole
stitch, or whatever it is called, that I used along the outside of the
applique pieces and the inner circle on each block was larger than my
grandmother's stitches that were made so many years ago. I had to re-train
myself to match her stitch size.
But, in the end, I guess I am glad I did this. I strengthened the family
bond between my cousin and I. I could almost feel my grandmother smiling
when I returned a beautifully finished restored quilt back to my cousin. My
advice (which I hope she followed) was to hang it on her wall and not use it
on her bed, though. She has five cats.... I don't dare ask if those cats
are on it all the time. I guess you just have to let go. My grandmother's
quilt was never labelled, it also has a new backing and a label on it that
identifies my grandmother as the maker (with her name and when she lived) it
has my cousin's name and city/state on it as the owner and my name as the
restorer with my city/state.


While I am "here" I was wondering if you all have advice about removing blue
marking pencil that seems to be a little stubborn coming off a background
fabric that is kind of a sepia colored (not the unbleached kind that is
off-white) muslin. I'm hand quilting something very special and usually I
simply use marking pencils. I have tried some of the marker types that are
more "modern" and have had bad luck with them coming off, or rather not
coming off. Sometimes the simple and older tools and methods are the best.
But, now, I am wondering. What works for you, if you have anything that you
use on your own. Thanks.

Linda Heminway
Plaistow, NH

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Judy Chicago at University of Louisville
From: Jo Major Ciolino <joanniemaj@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 27 Feb 2014 15:54:19 -0500

The University of Louisville has formally announced the nonprofit art
organization, *Through the Flower (*founded by noted artist Judy Chicago)
has gifted the "International Honor Quilt," an assemblage of more than 600
quilted triangles honoring women, to the University of Louisville's Hite
Art Institute. The artwork was created by a variety of artists in 1980's,
and accompanied Chicago's "The Dinner Party," a worldwide traveling
exhibition celebrating women's achievements throughout history.

The quilts depict women who are world leaders, authors, poets, and others
who influenced the quilters themselves. Each two-foot triangle has
supporting documents and photographs, all carefully cataloged by Dr. Marilee
Schmit Nason.

Recognized quilt expert and Kentucky Quilt Project Inc. founder Shelly
Zegart of Louisville, who met Chicago during a 1985 Louisville visit, was
instrumental in arranging the gift to UofL. "I am honored to have been the
catalyst to bring the 'International Honor Quilt' to Kentucky, a state
well-known for its quiltmaking traditions and activities. The University of
Louisville Hite Art Institute was privy to a good splash of serendipity,
many long-term relationships and most importantly the incredible generosity
of Judy Chicago, Donald Woodman and the feminist art organization Through
the Flower," Zegart said.

I'll check the UofL website for more information about exhibition planning,
etc. but for now - what a great score for the University of Louisville and
the quilt world! More info here: http://goo.gl/DDrxWt

Joan


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Judy Chicago at University of Louisville
From: Julie Silber <silber.julieellen@gmail.com>

Wonderful, Shelly! Thank you for your
work on getting this to happen.

Julie


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Honor Quilt
From: linda laird <clproducts@gmail.com>
Date: Fri, 28 Feb 2014 07:13:11 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

More on the International Honor Quilt is found at: =
http://www.throughtheflower.org/projects/international_honor_quilt#!prettyPhoto[pp_tdp]/13/=


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: manufacturers' labels on 19th century printed cottons
From: "Candace Perry" <candace@schwenkfelder.com>


I am finding these manufacturers' labels in the Schwenkfelder collection and
have quickly become enamored of them, since they are mini-masterpieces of
Victorian graphic design. I am quite sure someone must have done research on
them.can anyone point me to a resource?

Best,

Candace

---------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: RE: qhl digest: March 02, 2014
From: "Gebel " <gebel@earthlink.net>
Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2014 11:17:57 -0800
X-Message-Number: 1

I have a length of plain cotton with two gorgeous labels on it and so I too
would love to get more information on their use. Carol Gebel
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Rainbow Quilt Co Pattern
From: linda laird <clproducts@gmail.com>
Date: Sun, 9 Mar 2014 22:04:31 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Does anyone collect Rainbow Quilt Co. patterns? I found a #708 Waterlily =
that has never been made although it looks like its been traced and the =
white background fabric is not in pristine condition, has rust, stains, =
small holes. Should it be in a collection?=


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Quilt Study Day at the Connecticut Historical Society
From: Lynne Bassett <lynne@lynnezwoolsey.com>
Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2014 10:26:49 -0500

Dear All,

I am offering two programs next week at the Connecticut Historical
Society, and I hope to see some of you there! On Tuesday, March 11 at
5:30, I'll be giving a lecture, "New England's Early Quilts and the
Labor of Quilting," and on Wednesday, March 12, I'll be offering a Quilt
Study Day from 9:30 to 4:00. We're bringing out dozens of quilts from
the CHS collection, dating from the 1780s to about 1900, along with
costume items, so that participants can compare fabrics to learn helpful
tools in dating. Participants will also, in some cases, be allowed to
touch fabrics to learn fiber identification and how fabrics (wool
particularly) have changed over the generations. This will be a great
opportunity to bring your copy of Susan Greene's new book, /Wearable
Prints/, to compare with the fabrics seen in the quilts! A number of
pieces pictured in Susan's book will be on view.

Here's the link to more information: http://www.chs.org/page.php?id=630

I hope you can come!

All best,
Lynne Bassett---------

Subject: Harriet Powers Bible Quilt
From: Judy Schwender <sister3603@yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2014 09:43:04 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 1

Hello all,
I have it on good authority that the Harriet Powers Bible Quilt is coming out of storage at the Museum of Fine Arts Boston and will be up during the Quilts and Color exhibition (https://www.mfa.org/exhibitions/upcoming).

Judy Schwender


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: web site for Rainbow Quilt Block Company
From: Ark Quilts <quiltarkmv@yahoo.com>
Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2014 13:10:17 -0700 (PDT)
X-Message-Number: 2

-
I just did a quick search for the Rainbow Quilt Block Company's web site an=
d could not find it. =A0I know they had it up a few years ago. =A0Does anyo=
ne know if the Neimann family is still maintaining the web site business or=
how to locate it?=Thanks-Connie Ark, QHL member, Urbana, Ohio
-

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: web site for Rainbow Quilt Block Company
From: Lisa Kay Ruetz <quilltr@aol.com>


I would contact Sharon Pinka, as she is an expert on the Rainbow Quilt Comp=
any, and I think she has been in contact with the family.


Lisa



-----Original Message-----



I just did a quick search for the Rainbow Quilt Block Company's web site an=
d
could not find it. I know they had it up a few years ago. Does anyone kno=
w if
the Neimann family is still maintaining the web site business or how to loc=
ate
it?
Thanks-Connie Ark, QHL member, Urbana, Ohio

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: web site for Rainbow Quilt Block Company
From: Rose Werner <erwerner3104@yahoo.com>

The domain name rainbowquiltdesigns.com is for sale. I don't think the Neimans are maintaining it.=rosie

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: web site for Rainbow Quilt Block Company
From: florencemcconnell@comcast.net
Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2014 15:49:38 -0700
X-Message-Number: 5

I believe Rainbow Quilt Block Company is no longer in business and therefore
no longer maintains a website. Such a shame!

Florence


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Soldiers' quilts
From: Sally Ward <sallytatters@fastmail.co.uk>
Date: Wed, 12 Mar 2014 09:35:03 +0000
X-Message-Number: 1

Has anyone seen the back of one of the so-called 'soldiers' quilts made =
from the densely fulled uniform fabric? The very geometric designs =
often described as having been used as 'occupational therapy'? =
(apologies to practitioners of modern day OT, I know it is not the same =
thing)

I saw the travelling exhibition of Intarsia when it was in Leeds, and =
the excellent display showed the rear of the work as having been densely =
whip-stitched and then the whole pressed flat. But looking at, for =
example, a detail of a soldier's quilt on the V&A site it clearly shows =
the channel of a seam, like a seamed cotton patchwork. I am wondering =
whether the detailed pictorial work of the Intarsia hangings was made =
(by the expert tailors) with a different technique.

I had always thought there was a technique for soldiers' quilts whereby =
the raw edges ended up flush with each other but realise I have never =
seen the back of the real thing.

I also wonder if I am just over-thinking this. If you have a
shell-shocked soldier and you put a piece of fabric, needle and thread
in his hand, are you really going to be standing over him debating
technique?

Sally Ward


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: web site for Rainbow Quilt Block Company
From: buckboardquilts@cox.net
Date: Tue, 11 Mar 2014 22:06:28 -0500
X-Message-Number: 2

I just received a water lily handmade quilt from 1930-40s in mint conditon
probably made from that pattern I'm giving away in exchange for a check for
$269 made out to the food charity of your choice to feed needy children. See
http://www.buckboardquilts.com/depression_era_antique_quilts.htm

Depression era museum quality embroidered Lily Pond with French knots, great
sunny yellow and pink borders and sashings with yellow back—a cheery breath
of spring time.Great tulip, circular and straight line hand @ 8-9 st/in.
Unused Mint Condition. I was first to wash it and pencil quilting lines
still accent its beautiful quilting. Great buy I’m passing along. 68x88”
$267

-----Original Message-----
From: Florence McConnell
Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2014 5:49 PM
To: Quilt History List
Subject: [qhl] Re: web site for Rainbow Quilt Block Company

I believe Rainbow Quilt Block Company is no longer in business and therefore
no longer maintains a website. Such a shame!

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: Soldiers' quilts
From: Laura Fisher <laurafisherquilts@yahoo.com>

I just posted pictures of some on quilts vintage and antique fb site in the
past few weeks with some discussion, Very quickly cause i have to leave fo
r work--flat butted against each piece, never seen a 'seam with extra fabri
c,LA0Laura Fisher's
----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Re: web site for Rainbow Quilt Block Company
From: Laura Lane <collections@nequiltmuseum.org>
Date: Fri, 14 Mar 2014 12:17:47 -0400
X-Message-Number: 1

A year or 2 ago the family that owned the Rainbow Pattern Company was
trying to sell their collection of patterns etc. Anybody know who
bought the collection?

Laura Lane

--
Laura P. Lane
Collections Manager
New England Quilt Museum More


----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Stencil Quilts
From: "Leah Zieber" <leah.zieber@verizon.net>
Date: Thu, 20 Mar 2014 17:44:09 -0700

Hello to everyone - I am looking for someone who knows a bit about stencil
quilts and can help me determine if those found on this early quilt are true
to time period. I will send along some pictures to anyone who thinks they
may be able to help.

Thanks in advance and feel free to contact me privately off list.



Leah A. Zieber

Zieber Quilts

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: Stencil Quilts
From: Mary Anne R <sewmuch63@yahoo.com>


Leah: I hope you will share the photos and information when you get it.
I am a great admirer of those early stenciled quilts.ThanksMary An
neLeah A. Zieber wrote:I am looking for someone who knows a bit
about stencilquilts and can help me determine if those found on this ea
rly quilt are trueto time period.A0 I will send along some pictures to
anyone who thinks theymay be able to help.



----------------------------------------------------------------------

Subject: IQSCM Offers "American Chintz Appliqué Quilts" Summer Seminar
From: "Jonathan Gregory" <jgregory3@unl.edu>
Date: Tue, 25 Mar 2014 11:11:27 -0500
X-Message-Number: 1

The International Quilt Study Center & Museum at the University of
Nebraska-Lincoln announce their 2014 Summer Seminar.

TMFD 890 Seminar – American Chintz Appliqué Quilts
June 3-6, 2014
Meets MTWHF from 9-Noon and 1-3 pm
Carolyn Ducey, PhD, Instructor

This seminar focuses on a quilt style that produced one of the most highly
prized and significant bodies of American quilts of the nineteenth
century. “American Chintz Appliqué Quilts ” will begin with an exploration
of European antecedents and then trace the development of the style as it
evolved and matured in the U.S. The development of the chintz appliqué
quilt style will also be explored through a lens of social and cultural
influences. As the middle class developed in the early 19th century, and
the ‘cult of domesticity’ flourished, a consumer society emerged.
Consumerism became a means of establishing status and itself a means of
self-fulfillment and gratification. Expensive chintz quilts reflected this
societal change.

Summer registration is now open. There is a minimum enrollment of 10
students, so don’t delay registering for the course. If you have
additional questions about the course content, then contact Carolyn Ducey
(cducey1@unl.edu). If you have questions about registration, please
contact Sharon Reeder (sreeder1@unl.edu).


Jonathan Gregory
Assistant Curator of Exhibitions
International Quilt Study Center & Museum
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Subject: rainbow quilt block patterns
From: "Gale Slagle" <glslag@cox.net>
Date: Wed, 26 Mar 2014 18:09:59 -0700
X-Message-Number: 1

Sharon Fulton Pinka gave a talk on Rainbow at the AQSG -- perhaps she knows?
Her articles appear in Blanket Statements Issue 94.
and Uncoverings: Volume 30, 2009, pages 45-76

Grandson of William Bray Pinch - Randy Niemann and his wife Amy
had them in 2008-9.

This blog written by Louise - reported that in 2008-9 the grand- daughter in
law was digitizing them....
http://quiltpapers.blogspot.com/2008/01/rainbow-quilt-block-company.html

Louise apparently met them. Louise seems to keep some of her other blogs
more up to date. Perhaps you can contact her and see if she still knows how
to contact the Niemann's
https://www.blogger.com/profile/11183370556388892962 has a list of her
blogs - like:
http://kwiltkeyes.blogspot.com/

you are correct the Niemann's site www.rainbowquiltdesigns.com no longer
functions.

Good Luck