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Quilters Find a way to care

96008

 

Date: Sun, 8 Dec 1996 06:58:16 -0500 (EST)

From: jane stapel <bagladynauticom.net>

Nancy, I am so pleased you asked aobut mourning fabrics, indigos, and

shirting..yes, they are basic questions but to me basics means beginning and

that is what this forum is all about..so good for you..plus it gives ME a

chance to contribute..I feel that I 'take' all the time, and now I can

'give'.This is one of the stories from my lecture that is a favorite..The

TURKEY TRACK is also known as 'WANDERING FOOT' but DID you know that before

that, it was known as TENTS OF KEDAR, named after the nomadic tribes that

chased around the desert in their white sheets so many years agoo (some

still do)TENTS OF KEDAR was a mourning quilt and made in solid black and

solid white because prints had not yet been made..when prints DID COME

ABOUT, they then used black, white, and a black&white print..and it was used

to cover the casket of a family member and ONLY a family member could rest

under it..it was much like a blanket of flowers or a flag as wse use

today..if you were too poor to afford one, then a family member would lend

you their's..well, people back then were very superstitious and apparently a

hubby/father deserted his family and it was thought it was because he had

slept UNDER this quilt (it was probably because of the bad stitches)so the

beganto think that if a man slept under this quilt/pattern he would 'WANDER'

off..and if a young lady slept under it..she was SURE to come to no

good..hence the name WANDERING FOOT was attached to it..well, along came a

VERY wise quilter who used yellow and red..and that broke the superstition.

Another way patterns got their name..change the colors, the design a wee

bit, or location where it was made.and you change the name of the

pattern..there was an wonderful article in PIECEWORK magazind '94 and I have

the permission of GAIL ANDREWS TRECHSEL to reprint it in my newsletter and

also an article by CAROL WILLIAMS GEBEL who I met thru the AMERICAN QUILT

STUDY GROUP..I would enjoy sharing the article if you would like to have a

copy of it..or info from them here on forum..for anyone who does not know of

the AQSG, it is organization of quilters/historians who are involved in

indepth research of the subjects we who are here on this forum have..BLESS

THEM!! they do the hard part and we do the best part..READ IT!! Now, I feel

MUCH better that I can contribute..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Dec 1996 07:34:47 -0500

From: AJSNGSaol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Mourning quilts

Message-ID: <961208073447_1953001240emout06.mail.aol.com>

Jane, Good Morning! Thanks so much for your wonderful in depth background

stories on various aspects of quilts! I find them really interesting. Any

articles you find particularly interesting and can steer me towards, I'll be

glad to read. So let me know if you need a "real" address...

Have a good day! I'm sure you will see some more BASIC questions from me

from time to time.

Oh, before I forget. Does the American Quilt Society (or a similar

organization) have a list of all local quilt guilds? I looked in the phone

book in this area but found nothing. I don't really know where to start.

Northern Virginia has a number of quilt stores (which may have info. on

quilt guilds in No. Virginia) but those are 60-70 miles away and I want to

find one closer to home. Thanks.

Nancy

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Dec 1996 07:44:57 -0500 (EST)

From: jane stapel <bagladynauticom.net>

You are more than welcome, Nancy..where are you in VA? No, AQSG does not

have a list of guilds other than the ones who are members of the group, but

I am a member of the VA CONSORTIUM of QUILTERS and they take in all the

guilds in VA..just let me know where you are. Alot of the members on this

forum state where they are from..I'm sure it is optional..I am from

Pittsburgh and also Floyd, Va..you can write me at 25 S. Starr AVe #16, Pgh.

Pa. 15202..jane..and Debbie, I enjoyed your infor for Nancy at the questions

she asked..is teh dyeing principal for indigos rather intricate? There has

to be something special because they are rather expensive..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Dec 1996 08:30:41 -0500

From: AJSNGSaol.com

Hi Jane (again),

I'm in Fredericksburg, Virginia. Any articles you have can be sent to 2

Rosemont Ct. Fredericksburg, VA 22405. Please let me know if you find a

local guild for Fredericksburg. Thanks! Nancy

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Dec 1996 10:36:38 -0500

From: ektuppergarden.net (EK Tupperw)

>Kathy in NH wrote:

>

>I have been quilting since 1988 and ever since taking up quilting I have

>been interested in the history of it. The patterns, the fabrics, the

>women who made them. I love to read the historical type of quilting

>books telling the stories of quilts and the quilters who made them. I

>have several in my collection. I will probaly not be able to contribute

>much because I have not done any research just reading into the subject

>nor have I taken any classes in this area but who knows.

>

I am also interested in the history behind quilts and reading books with

stories of quilts and quilters. I'm sure others would also be interest in a

list of books and their authors that you have read. I would love too look

for them and would greatly enjoy reading them.

Betty in NJ

ektuppergarden.net

 

Date: Sun, 08 Dec 1996 10:49:02 -0600

From: "S. Scruggs" <sharon2access.com>

To: qhlcuenet.com

Subject: Re: QHL: How Glad I am to See this List Make a Debut!

Message-ID: <32AAF17E.7E5D2access.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I look forward to the many historically significant postings to be made

to this list. I have been a quilter for about 7 years now and was a

designer/sewer/knitter for many years prior. In recent years magazines

such as Piecework and now this list are adding the historical features

missing when one simply knows how to construct blocks and quilt designs.

Plus I feel that as I make art quilts, I am setting the stage for more

history to be written. Hopefully we will all write down stories of our

own that indicate the effects of history upon our own quiltmaking

progress.

Sharon

--

Jim & Sharon Scruggs

sharon2access.com

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Dec 1996 10:00:44 -0700

From: "Mary E Scott" <mscott28cybertrails.com>

To: <sharon2access.com>, <qhlcuenet.com>

Subject: Re: QHL: How Glad I am to See this List Make a Debut!

Message-Id: <199612080255.JAA16101 cybertrails.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I will definately second the motion!!! I have some old quilt tops that

were made by my grandmother. In fact on my webb page there is a picture of

a quilt that was pieced by my Great Grandmother & Grandmother, quilted by

my Mother, and left for me to bind. I am going to just turn the edges and

leave a part of it for my daughter to finish. That way there will be 5

different generations of Ashley's that have worked on it. Needless to say

this is a very Special quilt to me.

I took this quilt to the Quilters Ranch in Phoenix, AZ in November and some

of the ladies dated the materials in the top as being out of the late

1800's. I never had any idea that this quilt was that old. I knew it was

from at least the 20's or 30's (early) because my GGM was still alive then.

 

I also have some quilt tops that are not finished. One of my biggest

problems is finding material to finish them with. I have one in particular

that I am looking for a yellow material to go with it. I was at one time

going to make some more starts (6 points) to go with the ones that I have.

I have now decided that if I can find some soft yellow (Cub Scout yellow) I

will just finish it out to what ever size I can make out of what is there.

One of the problems with today's material is that it is of a much better

quality than what was available at the time that these tops were made.

Does any one know of a place that old material can be bought? I would like

to know it you do.

Well I have rambled on too long. So happy that this list is beginning.

Mary Scott

mscott28cybertrails.com

http://inficad.com/~lightsp/suitee/index.html

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Dec 1996 12:20:21 -0500

From: QuiltFixeraol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: First old quilt

Message-ID: <961208122020_1651868995emout16.mail.aol.com>

Here are two ways to keep that lovely story with the quilt.

Write out the story on fabric with a permanent marker and sew to the back of

the quilt or make a little pocket for the back and place the story inside.

If you do it on fabric, it will stay even if the quilt gets wet at some time

in the future. I prefer sewing it on. That way, it can't get lost.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Dec 1996 12:20:32 -0500

From: QuiltFixeraol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Re: Intruptions while at the screen

Message-ID: <961208122031_573710020emout04.mail.aol.com>

How about two cats crying so sadly outside the glass door to the

computer/quilting room? Mercy, mercy, please you guys. I need some time not

petting and talking to you! :)

Toni

QuiltFixeraol.com

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 08 Dec 1996 12:26:02 -0500

From: Kathy <DeSchuitix.netcom.com>

To: Quilting Heritage List <QHLcuenet.com>

Subject: Re: QHL: Books with stories of quilts and quilters

Message-ID: <32AAFA29.283Aix.netcom.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

EK Tupperw wrote:

I am also interested in the history behind quilts and reading books

with

stories of quilts and quilters. I'm sure others would also be interest

in a list of books and their authors that you have read. I would love

too look for them and would greatly enjoy reading them.

>

> Betty in NJ

> ektuppergarden.net

Betty,

Here are four of the titles I could locate quickly.

"A People and Their Quilts", by John Rice Irwin

published in 1984 and the first book with history of quilts and the

women that made them that I read.

"Treasures in the Trunk", by Mary Bywater Cross

published in 1993 the stories of women and their quilts who traveled the

Oregon Trail.

"The Quilters, Women and Domestic Art" by Patricia Cooper and Norma

Bradley Allen

Stories as family members remember them about quilts and the woman who

made them.

"A Patchwork of Pieces, An Anthology of Early Quilt Stories 1845-1940"

compiled by Cuesta Ray benberry and Carol Pinney Crabb

published in 1993 by AQS. Individual stories about quilters and their

quilts.

A friend in quilting,

--

Kathy in NH

DeSchuitix.netcom.com

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 08 Dec 1996 12:30:34 -0500

From: Kathy <DeSchuitix.netcom.com>

To: Quilting Heritage List <QHLcuenet.com>

Subject: QHL: A good source for books

Message-ID: <32AAFB3A.2CE7ix.netcom.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

If you can't locate any type of book you are looking for I have found a

web site that I can usually order any type of book from and their prices

are usually discounted. Here is the place:

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/subst/index2.html

I am not affiliated in any way with this company, just thought I would

share this information with you.

--

Kathy in NH

DeSchuitix.netcom.com

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Dec 1996 12:40:48 -0500

From: SadieRoseaol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Books with stories of quilts and quilters

Message-ID: <961208124048_1953019631emout10.mail.aol.com>

Here are a few of my favorite books with stories of quilts and quilters, lots

more to add to this later! Karan (from Iowa where the wind is whistling!)

"Dear Jane- The 225 Patterns from the 1863 Jane A. Stickle Quilt" by

Brenda Manges Papadakis is one of my favorite new books from 1996. This book

contains patterns for all of the 4 1/2" blocks in a wonderful sampler quilt

made by Jane A. Stickle, completed in 1863. Brenda became intrigued with

this quilt, and working from a photograph, started making little blocks. She

soon became obsessed with the quilt, and even traveled from her home in

Tennessee to the Bennington Museum in Vermont, which is now the home of

Jane's quilt. She eventually drafted patterns for all the blocks, and for

the border "ice cream cone" triangles, which were also elaborately pieced

blocks. Brenda taught classes with theses blocks, and the subsequent quilt

projects have been dubbed "Baby Janes". The book is filled with Brenda's

"letters" to Jane, following her steps as she discovers more about the quilt

and Jane herself. Pub. by Quilt House Publishing, 1996. ISBN #

1-881588-15-7

"Remember Me When This You See- Women and Their Friendship Quilts" by Linda

Otto Lippsett pub by The Quilt Digest Press 1985 ISBN # 0-913327-03-4

(pbk).

Linda researched the family histories based on 8 antique signature quilts.

These are poignant stories, illustrated with gorgeous color photos of the

quilts, and b&w photos of the makers & family members. Strips away any rosy

pictures you might have about living in the "good old days". Families were

torn apart by death, which happened without warning to young and old...as

well as moving west as the country expanded.

Quilts were often the only tangible connection with loved ones.

Linda did further research on the story of Ellen Spaulding Reed, who's story

is begun in "Remember Me", and published a sequel, "Pieced From Ellen's

Dress" pub by Halstead & Meadows Publishing 1991 ISBN # 0-9629399-0-0

This second book was based on 12 years of research, and was made possible

by the wonderful discovery of a box of letters from the 1850's- the letters

written between Ellen and her family back East. (These 2 books are older and

are probably out of print, but worth tracking down!)

Because of the signatures on these quilts, the stories were able to be

traced. One of the most frustrating things in our state research project,

was how many quilts we saw with no indication of who had made them, where, or

when. I am encouraging every quilter to document her own work, sign and date

your quilts!! Also, to document and sign any old quilts, epecially those

who's "story" you know!! Mary Ellen Hopkins, of Crazy Ladies & Friends

quilt shop, told a "joke" about looking down from Heaven, and watching your

heirs give credit to the grandma on the "other side" of the family for the

quilt you had made!! If your name and other info is on the quilt, this

won't happen!!

If you are interested in writing on quilts, either on the front or for the

back, there are several excellent books by Susan McKelvey. Her newest book,

"The Signature Quilt" was co-written with Pepper Cory. It is a very

interesting book, actually 3 books in one. The first section is on the

history of signature quilts. Part 2 includes techniques such as how to do

Inking, stenciling or rubber stamping on blocks, and tips for making

signature quilts in a group situation. Book 3 is a pattern book of quilt

designs suitable for signatures....not all of these are traditional blocks,

and they show some very contemporary sets and colorations. The book is

filled with excellent color photos of antique quilts and new quilts. It was

pub. in 1995 by Quilt House Publishing, ISBN # 1-881588-14-9

 

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Dec 1996 12:41:04 -0500

From: SadieRoseaol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Mourning quilts & book

Message-ID: <961208124102_1487926640emout20.mail.aol.com>

Here is a little more information on Mourning:

"Mourning dress and fashion went hand in hand. The signals of mourning

were definged to a large degree by both color and texture. Black was the

predominant color, worn by young women or to indicate grief for children.

The addition of white to the costume also marked certain stages of mourning.

Fashion magazines presented the latest styles, including accessories from

black-edged handkerchiefs to parasols.

"For men, the etiquette of mourning was less severe, sometimes requiring

only bands on hats; the width of the bands indicated the closeness of the

relative or the length of time in mourning. Even if it was a man's relative

who had passed on, his wife was the one who had to separate herself from

society for the appropriate period of time. A widow's mourning was the

longest- more than two years, made up of one year of deep mourning followed

by stages of "slighting the mourning" and "half mourning". (Half mourning

colors were gray, lavender, mauve and violet). All of the widow's dress and

activities were regimented within the stictures of mourning codes, from the

jewelry she could wear to the exact size of the black borders on her

stationery. The mourning period for a child's or parent's death was one

year; for a sister or brother, six months. Lesser time periods were

specified for more distant relatives."

The previous 2 paragraphs are quoted from "On Women & Friendship- A

Collection of Victorian Keepsakes and Traditions" by Starr Ann Ockenga. If

you subscribe to VICTORIA magazine, you may recognize her name, as she is a

frequent contributor. The photography also reminds me of VICTORIA,

exquisitely done. This is a fascinating book, documenting the importance

that women in the 1800's placed on their friendships with one another, and

the tokens of these friendships which still exist today: autograph albums,

needlework tools & stitched items such as samplers and quilts, to

daquerreotypes & photographs. There is also a section on the "Hidden

Languages" where flowers, colors, and everyday items carried a hidden

meaning, whereby Victorian suitors could sneak messages by the chaperones.

The book is full of quotes of poetry and prose. This book is hard cover,

published by Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 1993 ISBN # 1-55670-242-6 One of

those "worth the investment".

TTFN.....Karan

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Dec 1996 15:04:26 -0500 (EST)

From: jane stapel <bagladynauticom.net>

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: va. guilds for nancy

Message-Id: <199612082004.PAA08035pgh.nauticom.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Your local guild is Virginia Star Quilt Guild at P O Box 41103,

Fredericksburg, 22405. contact is Janice Fletcher at 10811 Ann Davis

Dr..540 898 1824. they meet the 3rd Wed at 7pm at Harrison Rd Community

Center..I lectured for that guild, a great group of quilters and they can

tell you of other guilds/quilt bees in their area..quiltbees are great for

experience..my home in VA is wayy down in VA, almost in to NC. You are in a

great area for EVERYTHING..

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Dec 1996 15:23:22 -0500

From: CTislanderaol.com

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Ho for California! - another quilt history book

Message-ID: <961208152321_1387949905emout17.mail.aol.com>

Another book with good color photos of old quilts is called "Ho for

California!: Pioneer Women and Their Quilts" by Jean Ray Laury and the

California Heritage Quilt Project, E.P. Dutton, New York, copyright 1990 by

the California Heritage Quilt Project, $22.50, paperback, ISBN 0-525-48533-3.

There are 140 color plates and many black and white photographs of the women

who made the quilts. Many of the quilts were made in the eastern U.S. and

transported to California. I loved the family stories. The oldest quilts are

from the mid 1800. The quilts came by covered wagon and ship in the early

days. The newest quilts are from the 1940s.

In the introduction by Gloria Ricci Lothrop: "In the belief that 'men make

history; women simply are history,' the contributions, in fact the very

presence of women, have until recently been overlooked. Equally neglected has

been the entire field of social history that could have surveyed the

fragmentary evidence relating to these anonymous and unheralded

trailblazers."

Christine T. in the California Delta

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Dec 1996 15:20:41 -0500 (EST)

From: jane stapel <bagladynauticom.net>

To: qhlcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: books on quilt history

Message-Id: <199612082020.PAA04589pgh.nauticom.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Betty, I too prefer the history on quilts and their makers..I bought quilt

books and magazines just like everyone else. Then one day I realized all I

was doing was buying the same pattern, put together in a different way, and

in a different color..so I started with history books..I find that the state

quilt search books are a great source. Naturally, I am always looking for

feedsack quilts as well and luckily they always seem to pop up.I'm sure that

you have now asked, lots of titles will be forth coming. If anyone has in

interest in feedsacks, then one of my members wrote the bible on them, and

I'll be happy to share the info. I am about to get into the OHIO quilts

published by Rutledge..GEAT BOOK!! JANE of Pa/Va..

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 08 Dec 1996 16:01:46 -0500

From: "Perry C. Trimble" <trimblepindy.net>

To: Quilting Heritage List <QHLcuenet.com>

Subject: QHL: Books

Message-ID: <32AB2CBA.29A0indy.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi, everyone!

I just wanted to add my voice to Kathy's in recommending *The Quilters:

Women and Domestic Art" by Patricia Coooper and Norma Bradley Buferd.

This is the only such volume I own (but it will have many siblings very

soon, thanks to this list), and I bought it many, many years ago at the

Smithsonian Institution - they were having a book sale! At any rate, I

have never felt so connected to other women before in such a way. This

is a wonderful accounting of the women in Texas and New Mexico - the

"sod busters" - and their personal and community accounts. I really

recommend this book, especially if you want to be bitten by the quilt

history bug - REALLY HARD!

Marilyn in Indy

trimblepindy.net

OLD QUILTERS NEVER DIE - THEY JUST GO TO PIECES

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Dec 1996 16:00:48 -0500

From: AJSNGSaol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: va. guilds for nancy

Message-ID: <961208160047_1885936323emout18.mail.aol.com>

Jane, thanks for the local quilters guild information. I appreciate it!

Nancy

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Dec 1996 16:13:43 -0500

From: Debbie Roberts <QuiltAppraiserwow.com>

To: "QHLcue.com QHLcue.com" <QHLcue.com>

Subject: QHL: Reply to: Re: QHL: Books with stories of quilts and quilters

Message-ID: <199612081613_MC1-CD0-7EBBcompuserve.com>

The Texas Research Project books (2) are great. They go into great detail

regarding the quilter, and give very vivid descriptions of the photo quilts

themselves.

These books were great tools for studying for the appraiser certificaton test.

Debbie Roberts - changing e-mail to QuiltListaol.com

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Dec 1996 16:06:05 -0500 (EST)

From: jane stapel <bagladynauticom.net>

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: listed books

Message-Id: <199612082106.QAA11217pgh.nauticom.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Wow! Sadie Rose..that's a great beginning for books..can't wait to see what

others post..great subject and so glad Betty in NJ asked..so glad EVERYONE

who has asked has done so..it's wonderful we don;'t feel intimidated..I

think it is because we all got in on the ground floor..it has always given

ME more confidence..ever when I do find out there are so many much more

advanced than me..I jsut figure we all walked thru the door at the same

time..by the way, SadieRose, I have a healing quilt and one of the patterns

in the sampler is Sadie Rose's Choice..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Dec 1996 16:40:02 -0500

From: Debbie Roberts <QuiltAppraiserwow.com>

To: "QHLcue.com QHLcue.com" <QHLcue.com>

Subject: QHL: Reply to: Re: QHL: Reply to: QHL: Dumb questions

Message-ID: <199612081640_MC1-CCE-FFA6compuserve.com>

Nancy,

Regarding AOL, the access # it used for my area was also always busy, so in

the sign up mode, I looked for alternate access numbers, of which there were

20-30 available for my area in So.California. I changed the access number

and have not had a problem. YET??????

 

Debbie

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Dec 1996 16:38:26 -0500 (EST)

From: jane stapel <bagladynauticom.net>

I tried to access the web site for Gwen Marson and up came, you can't

without a frames-capable browser..anyother way I can reach you on the web? Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 8 Dec 1996 15:17:32 -0700

From: "Mary E Scott" <mscott28cybertrails.com>

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi all:

I am Mary Scott and I live in a small town in North-east Arizona. It is

called Taylor, I have been quilting for only about 2 years but I love to

do it anyhow. I am learning. I enjoy making pieced traditional quilts. I

have involved myself in a Folk Art swap that I think is going to almost be

a college education. I am looking forward to doing it. I also enjoy

applique. I have about 5 applique quilts in the dream factory.. I hope to

get a couple of them done this year.

I am a stay at home MOM. Now it is Grandma. I have 3 grown children that all live somewhere else except tTaylor. I have 6 grandsons and no

granddaughters. I hoped for a long time but I think that my kids have

decided to stop having kids - at least for now.

I really can't think of much to say. You can check out my Web page and it

will tell you a little more about JJ and I. Thanks for your time. I think

that I am really going to enjoy this group. I love antiques. I'm one of

them so I must love them.

Mary Scott

mscott28cybertrails.com

http://inficad.com/~lightsp/suitee/index.html

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 08 Dec 1996 22:57:36 -0800

From: "Arlene G. Goldberg" <arleneggicanect.net>

The books of Linda Otto Lipsett, including Pieced from Ellen's Quilt, are

available form Halstead & Meadows Publishing. Their web page is

http://home.earthlink.net/~halsteadpub/

No affil.

Arlene

arleneggicanect.net

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 9 Dec 1996 06:06:29 +0000

From: Susan Nixon <Desertskyworldnet.att.net>

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: indigo

Message-ID: <19961209060546.AAC9743LOCALNAME>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Here is my understanding of the indigo cost. The dye process is extensive,

but it is the dye itself that costs so much. Indigo comes from a plant and

it takes a *large* number of the plants to produce a small amount of dye.

There is a weed which grows here in Arizona which can be used as a

substitute for indigo - it actually is a variety of the original plant,

apparently. However, it also takes a *large* amount of this plant to make a

small amount of dye.

Susan in Sunny Phoenix, Arizona, USA

 

 

______

__/ | | \__

/ | | \

\_/| / \ |\_/

| | Wishin' I could just sit around on

| | the cowch for a few days!

\ /

| ^^ |

\ __ /

\/

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 9 Dec 1996 09:45:46 +0000

From: "Kathleen Duvall" <nanwkshplc.gulfnet.com>

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: New to List and Old Quilts

Message-Id: <14483807034571kong.gulfnet.com>

Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII

Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Kris, thanks so much for organizing this list! I know some folks

here from other lists and am glad to be a part of this.

By way of brief introduction, I make and sell "timeworn" type dolls

and other fabric crafts fulltime at shows and at a craft mall. DH is

a parttime antique dealer and keeps his eye out for old quilts for

me. I use the somewhat raggedy ones for table covers for display, the

really raggedy ones for cutter quilts, and others I collect. I also

buy old quilt blocks when I run across them.

Saturday DH came home from garage sales with three beautiful old

quilts in perfect condition -- for $10 each!! I'm not very skilled

at dating quilts, and I guessed these are from the 20's and 30's, but

I'm not sure. I wish I could hold them up to the computer and you

could tell me!

One is a bowtie made out of assorted fabrics with white sashing

between the blocks. I'm guessing this was made in the 30's because

of the colors and fabric -- one fabric is a white with flowers in

turquoise and orange and yellow (the colors of the Fiesta dinnerware

DH collects). There is a blue with white paisley. Several striped

fabrics in reds and blues.

Another quilt is roughly pieced -- no particular block used. Looks

like a real utility quilt. The fabrics are the "bubble gum pink",

stripes, plaids and a variety of prints that could be house dress

fabrics or feedsacks? Small florals in pinks, reds, purple and

green. One large print is a white background with blue, yellow, and

pink circles. The backing is a grey fabric. VERY large quilting

stitches.

The third quilt is made up of three rows of four patch strips put

together with sashing in between to make up large blocks. The fabric

includes some of that "indigo" (I believe) -- the navy blue with tiny

white flowers. There are plaids, stripes, small prints, and a small

amount of "deco" looking design fabric.

Kris suggested maybe you all could help me date these? Sorry this

first post is so long!

The quilt I use on my bed is what I think of as an orphan quilt -- a

Grandmother's Flower Garden that is totally made out of 60's

polyester fabric! DH brought it home from a garage sale one day and

I thought, "Who could love this?" A quilt made when quilting was too

old fashioned and there weren't quilt shops everywhere full of

beautiful cottons. This quilt washes like a dream, though, and I do

recognize fabric I used to have in some pant suits!! I feel that by

using it I'm honoring the woman who spent so much time making it.

Again, sorry so long! And glad to be here.

Kathleen Duvall in Florida

nanwkshplc.gulfnet.com

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 9 Dec 96 15:27:15 UT

From: "JoAnne " <jbstanmsn.com>

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Dear Jane

Message-Id: <UPMAIL04.199612091529060531msn.com>

I am trying to reproduce the piecing, if not the fabrics of the Jane A.

Stickle quilt in the Dear Jane book..........I have lots of fabric collected

that I think accurately reflects the time period........but I need lots more!!

Close inspection of the wonderful photos included in the book show more

geometrics than I can find..........anyway, in general I am a newbie to this

time period.........am looking forward so very much to this list.....learning

more and more and finding the sources I need.........glad to meet you all!!!

JoAnne

jbstanmsn.com

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 9 Dec 1996 09:50:17 -0600

From: "Lang" <langwellsville.com>

Hello, my name is Eula, I live in Kansas and am new to this list. I Love

quilting, do machine piecing and hand-quilting. I am a stay-at-home mom

with 4, not-so-small-anymore kids--20, 17, 14 and 12. I enjoy hearing

stories of how different patterns got their names, I like to go to estate

auctions and have managed to latch onto some late 1800's blocks (shirting

prints) at one and some 30's prints at another. I am already enjoying the

postings here and look forward to learning more. Eula<langwellsville.com>

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 09 Dec 1996 07:20:07 -0800

From: Kathy Patterson <k.pattersonworldnet.att.net>

To: "QHLcue.com" <QHLcue.com>

Hi! My name is Kathy Patterson. I live in wet, wet Washington state. My grandmother and my mother were always making quilts when I was growing up.

Unfortunately I wasn't interested in making quilts when I was younger. I

have been making quilts now for about 3 years. I am still learning all of the

different tricks. My husband and I both grew up on farms and we have a small farm with a few

animals. Our children are now both in middle school and I have extra time so I am

able to devote more time to the quilts.

I am very interested in the history of the different quilts. Thank you to all

of you experienced quilters who have taken the time to learn about the

history of quilts and to pass it on to the rest of us.

 

Kathy from wet, wet Washington (the state)

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 9 Dec 1996 12:59:33 -0500

From: SadieRoseaol.com

 

I purchased fat 1/4s of the "Madders" collection from Vintage & Vogue, to

use for my 'Baby Jane' blocks. This line of fabric is by P & B Textiles,

came out this spring. Here is the description of the line from the

"Quiltique" newsletter:

"34 fabrics, 8 distinctive motifs, drawn from the companies extensive

collection of antique fabrics, blocks, etc. Madder, a plant, was used to

perfection in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries by first the Indian and

Middle Easterners, and subsequently, the Europeans. Used in conjunction with

mordants, the coloring material in the madder plant gave a rich range of

colors: including black, brown, crimson, purple, lilac, and pink. Accents of

blue and green outlined floral motifs. "Madders" from P & B Textiles,

recreates authentic motifs in four distinct palettes. The first is deep,

dark and very brown. The second features lighter shades of browns (towards

goldish), purples and lilacs. The third group accents blues and tans, the

fourth accents the black, pink, cocoa, and green shades". Quoted from the

Feb. 1996 issue of Quiltiques newsletter, by Marianne Schweers.

I called Marianne to see if she still had the "Madders" available, and she

said yes. So, if you want to treat yourself (only you and Santa know how

truly good you have been this year <VBG>) this might be a good reproduction

line to add to your fabric collection. I think the scale and designs in this

line are especially good for the 4 1/2" size of the 'Baby Jane' blocks.

There are also several stripes in the collection. The colors are well

described above, except that there is also a nice sort of smoky or grayed

aqua, which is one of my favorites. Yum!! This is my 'after Christmas'

project, can't wait to get started!! Happy Monday, Karan from Iowa

------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Mon, 9 Dec 1996 06:06:29 +0000

From: Susan Nixon <Desertskyworldnet.att.net>

 

Here is my understanding of the indigo cost. The dye process is extensive,

but it is the dye itself that costs so much. Indigo comes from a plant and

it takes a *large* number of the plants to produce a small amount of dye.

There is a weed which grows here in Arizona which can be used as a

substitute for indigo - it actually is a variety of the original plant,

apparently. However, it also takes a *large* amount of this plant to make a

small amount of dye.

Susan in Sunny Phoenix, Arizona, USA

 

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 9 Dec 1996 09:45:46 +0000

From: "Kathleen Duvall" <nanwkshplc.gulfnet.com>

 

Kris, thanks so much for organizing this list! I know some folks

here from other lists and am glad to be a part of this.

By way of brief introduction, I make and sell "timeworn" type dolls

and other fabric crafts fulltime at shows and at a craft mall. DH is

a parttime antique dealer and keeps his eye out for old quilts for

me. I use the somewhat raggedy ones for table covers for display, the

really raggedy ones for cutter quilts, and others I collect. I also

buy old quilt blocks when I run across them.

Saturday DH came home from garage sales with three beautiful old

quilts in perfect condition -- for $10 each!! I'm not very skilled

at dating quilts, and I guessed these are from the 20's and 30's, but

I'm not sure. I wish I could hold them up to the computer and you

could tell me!

One is a bowtie made out of assorted fabrics with white sashing

between the blocks. I'm guessing this was made in the 30's because

of the colors and fabric -- one fabric is a white with flowers in

turquoise and orange and yellow (the colors of the Fiesta dinnerware

DH collects). There is a blue with white paisley. Several striped

fabrics in reds and blues.

Another quilt is roughly pieced -- no particular block used. Looks

like a real utility quilt. The fabrics are the "bubble gum pink",

stripes, plaids and a variety of prints that could be house dress

fabrics or feedsacks? Small florals in pinks, reds, purple and

green. One large print is a white background with blue, yellow, and

pink circles. The backing is a grey fabric. VERY large quilting

stitches.

The third quilt is made up of three rows of four patch strips put

together with sashing in between to make up large blocks. The fabric

includes some of that "indigo" (I believe) -- the navy blue with tiny

white flowers. There are plaids, stripes, small prints, and a small

amount of "deco" looking design fabric.

Kris suggested maybe you all could help me date these? Sorry this

first post is so long!

The quilt I use on my bed is what I think of as an orphan quilt -- a

Grandmother's Flower Garden that is totally made out of 60's

polyester fabric! DH brought it home from a garage sale one day and

I thought, "Who could love this?" A quilt made when quilting was too

old fashioned and there weren't quilt shops everywhere full of

beautiful cottons. This quilt washes like a dream, though, and I do

recognize fabric I used to have in some pant suits!! I feel that by

using it I'm honoring the woman who spent so much time making it.

Again, sorry so long! And glad to be here.

Kathleen Duvall in Florida

nanwkshplc.gulfnet.com

------------------------------

------------------------------

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: An Intro

Shelley had some trouble signing up - I think we have it cleared up now! -

and asked me to post this bio for her.

>Hi Everybody,

>

>Like some of you, Kris Driessen talked me into joining this list.

>

>I live in Plattsburgh NY and have one DH of nearly 21 years and one

>daughter aged 16 who is currently living in France on a Rotary exchange.

>She will return home some time next August (Boo Hoo!)

>

>I used to be a big time antique dealer in the eighties, and in 1984 ended

>up buying an estate full of quilts. I just loved them but money was money

>at the time and I ended up selling all 42 of them to one person for around

>$50 each !!!! Later that year, there was a show of antique quilts at the

>Historical Society, and there were all the quilts I had sold this lady.

>Seeing them all hung up so beautifully, I nearly died!!!! I swore right

>there and then that I would keep buying quilts and tops but that in the

>future, I was going to KEEP them for MYSELF. I have quite an extensive

>collection (Ask Kris who has seen some of it) and I do weed out from time

>to time and improve the quality of the collection. I still do buy quilts

>and tops strictly for resale and keep the stuff that I like. I make a

>little money to continue my habit.

>

>In 1992, I was very ill and made a list of all the things I wanted to do in

>my life. One of them was to learn to quilt. So sometime in 1993, I went

>with a friend to our local quilt guild, and ended up taking every class

>they offered. I made 6 or 7 quilts or wallhangings the first year. My

>first was a Lone Star :") Last year I completed 14 quilts and this year I

>am up to number 17. Some are tied some are hand quilted and a very few are

>machine quilted. (There are photos of some of the ones I've made on my

>webpage also) I just started keeping track to see how much I was actually

>accomplishing with all the time I was spending on this obsession. :")

>Learning to quilt helped me to be a more informed consumer when it came to

>quilts. I recently purchased some wonderful quilts in Watertown NY. Some

>are for sale on my web page and one I have kept for myself. It is a double

>pink and dark green, Orange Peel design and is meticulously quilted

>throughout. I date it at around 1890 or so due to the type of green in it.

>The quilting stitches are around 10 to 12 to the inch. The quilt I

>purchased with it, is a dark red and white ocean waves?, and is currently

>for sale on my web page. It was made by the same woman and is truly in

>pristine shape. Unfortunately, the color is not quite right on my page so

>it is not accurately depicted there.

>

>In the summer of 1995, I was fortunate to take an all day class from Paul

>Pilgrim. I learned a ton of stuff about the age of quilts and how to date

>fabric etc. He will surely be missed in the world of antique quilts. I

>also took a class from a friend of Kris's, Kathleen Greenwold, in the

>Albany area on NY state quilts. That was also a wonderful eye opener for

>me as well.

>

>I have taught quite a number of friends to make quilts and the book I

>always use is by Leslie Lindsay. It is called The Weekend Quilt. I find

>it is very good for beginners to just jump in and get their feet wet, make

>a fast quilt, and learn from there as they continue to grow as quilters.

>

>Well, that's my 59 cents for today.

>Thanks for listening

>Shelley

>

>___________________________________________________

 

Date: Tue, 10 Dec 1996 11:33:56 -0500

From: JQuiltaol.com

 

I am looking for a book, about the history of quilts.....Particularly during

the post-civil war period 1865-1900.

I read one very interesting book titled "Stitched from the Soul" about the

sewing/quilting done in the slave quarters, of many plantations...

I would love to hear about any books that anyone out there can recommend.

TIA

Jean

jquiltaol.com

------------------------------

 

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 96 00:19:00 GMT

From: hooleygenie.com

I have a question about the batting used in antique quilts. The one

I have is so soft, and thin it doesn't even seem as though there was

any batting used, but some of the fabric is gone, so I see it.

I'd like to know what batting is available today that replicates

the antique batting. I've used Mountain Mist Blue Ribbon cotton, but

it's stiff, I've used Thermore, but it's too light & ripples. I'm

considering flannel or wool? Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Thanks.

Cathy in upstate NY

--------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Dec 1996 22:07:59 -0500

From: QRestoreaol.com

 

Cathy;

You may want to try Hobbs, Heirloom Cotton Batting, it resembles the

thin cotton batts of old quilts our grandmothers had. It wears well, quilts

well and is quite soft. I use it for most of my handmade quilts.

Victoria Montgomery

QRestoreaol.com

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 10 Dec 1996 22:23:59 -0500 (EST)

From: aardvarkime.net (A.A. Harkavy)

 

Cathy asked about batting for antique quilts:

>I'd like to know what batting is available today that replicates

>the antique batting.

I am not a polyester fan for a variety of reasons, which I won't use

bandwidth to go into here and now.

> I've used Mountain Mist Blue Ribbon cotton, but

>it's stiff,

This is true.

> I've used Thermore, but it's too light & ripples.

And it is polyester and I think it should not go into antique quilts.

> I'm

>considering flannel or wool? Any suggestions would be appreciated.

1. Hobbs 100% wool is a nice batt, but I probably would not use it in an

antique. It performs more like poly than like cotton, and though it may

eventually "felt" as did the old wool batts, it has been resinated (resin

coated) to prevent exactly this. I have not been impressed with other wool

batts because a.) some contain lanolin and b.) others are difficult to hand

quilt.

2. Of the cotton batts, Quilter's Cotton Request (lightest weight) and

Select (next to lightest) are good for hand quilting. Both have what I'd

call a "believable" antique feel after a few washings, particularly if

closely quilted. Both are available in many sizes in natural and in white.

3. My previous favorite was Hobbs 100% cotton organic. Several quilters

have reported problems to Hobbs (seeds, oil stains), and Hobbs has not been

as responsive to these problems as one might like. The problems all appear

to have occurred (according to Hobbs) as a result of a substandard shipment

of 500 pounds of cotton. To be on the safe side, though, I would recommend

the Quilter's Cotton.

4. Fairfield Soft Touch is another all-cotton batt that can be hand

quilted. I find it more difficult to hand quilt than QUilter's Cotton

Request weight (white or natural). It seems comparable to Quilter's Cotton

Select weight, bleached (not natural). Quilts made from this batt are

slightly less supple than those made from Hobbs 100% cotton organic or

QUilter's Cotton request weight; they do soften up over time, as would any

product made from 100% cotton.

Remember, the bleaching process makes the cotton a bit tougher and somewhat

more difficult to hand quilt than natural.

Hope this helps.

--Addy

aardvarkime.net

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 1996 07:03:09 -0500

From: AJSNGSaol.com

 

Victoria, I read your post to Cathy about the Heirloom Batting. I'm so glad

that I read that because it sounds like something I would like to use too.

You answered a question that I wasn't even asking YET, but would be sure to

in the near future!

Thanks for this good information.

Nancy AJSNGSaol.com

------------------------------

Date: 11 Dec 96 08:37:55 EST

From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037CompuServe.COM>

 

The swap sounds good. We at Thistle Hill reproduce document checks and stripes in cotton for the period 1725 - 1870. You can get our samples by writing or

calling us We would be glad to be involved. We also offer many other historic

reproductions things such as dimities both cap and upholstery weights, dommet

flannels, jean, linsey-woolsey etc. our full sample pack is $5. you can email us

at 75444.1037CompuServ.com our new web page should be up and running in about 30

days. We are strictly a weving mill reproducing historic textiles at the

present time we dont do any printing but who knows. We also supply worsted and

cotton twill tapes and clothing fabrics to reenactors. We do the majority of our

own research Rabbit Goody has been involved in textile technology and textile

history resesearch in the museum field for a long time. I would be glad to

answer questions about fabric dating and identification

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 1996 10:02:59 -0800

From: dancheryldelphi.com (Daniel N. McWilliams)

To: QHLcue.com

 

Great to have this list on historic quilts & quilting! My name is Cheryl

McWilliams, residing in Beaumont, TX; was education curator 1796-1820

French Colonial Louisiana plantation for several yrs. It was the perfect

"job"; had time to learn about historic quilt collections; as well as

establish special

grant programs that enhanced the public's awareness of the quilts they had.

Book of interest to me: "The American Quilt: a history of cloth and comfort,

1750-1950" by Roderick Kiracofe with Mary Elizabeth Johnson. It is rather

expensive book, but might be found in your local library.

am interested in the author of "Stitched from the Soul".

Thanks,

Cheryl

dancheryldelphi.com

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 1996 14:31:00 -0500

From: QRestoreaol.com

To: QHLcuenet.com

 

Members;

Let's have a discussion about the controversy surrounding washing quilts;

Bathtub vs Machine. Camille Dalphond Cognac's book "Quilt Restoration A

Practical Guide" states "If ten collectors were asked how to clean quilts,

ten different answers could be expected." She also points out "The most dangerous aspect of cleaning any quilt is what it may do to dye rot. Some quilt fabrics were produced by using iron as a mordant to set the dye colors". . . "In my experience, dye rot is made worse by laundering." . . .

"Not cleaning a quilt is the least stressful method for the quilt."

"One must first determine whether the fabric(s) are color fast by rubbing a dry white cloth over the fabric. If it remains white, then dampen the white cloth in cold water and rub the fabric again. If the cloth remains white, repeat the process with warm water; and finally repeat the process with the soap product to be used. Even though these steps will help, fabric colors may still run once immersed in water and agitated."

 

Quilt Cleaning Debate: Bathtub vs Machine (Portions described in Camille

Dalophond Cognac's book Quilt Restoration A Practical Guide)

Bathtub: Lower a quilt into a tub of tepid water lined with a clean, white sheet (edges hanging over the tub). Soak, with several changes of water, drain for several hours so the quilt's weight presses the excess water out. 

Machine: Primary use of the machine is to spin the excess water out, and not let excess water stay in the fabric for any length of time. Washing quilts in a bathtub causes the weight of all the water to put a strain on the stitching and makes it very difficult to get excess water out of the quilt.

"If any bleeding is likely to occur this will surely aid the process."

Jinney Beyer (The Keepsake Quilter) Many report washing quilts in the

machine on a gentle cycle, with minimal agitation and no adverse affect. Others use the bathtub to wash the quilt and take it to a washing machine tospin the excess water out. Some recommend, once a quilt washed in thebathtub has drained, roll it up in the sheet used as a liner. This helps

lessen the strain put on the stitches while moving.

Drying: Most all agree never use the dryer to dry a quilt. Lay the damp

quilt out flat on top of sheets (flannel is good). Never hang a wet quilt,

it will cause distortion. Use large fans to help speed the drying, reversing

the quilt and drying the back. Make sure the quilt is thoroughly dry (it can

take several days) before storing.

Storing: Roll your quilts don't fold them. Folding over time causes damage.

Never store quilts in a plastic bag unless your shipping it somewhere (it

will cause mildew). Quilts can be stored, wrapped in natural, unbleached,

untreated (no sizing, etc) cotton muslin once it has been protected with acid

free paper between the layers to prevent dye migration. Cotton allows the

quilt to breathe.

Three major considerations for all quilts; Keep Away From: Heat, Light, and

Moisture.

Let's hear from you members out there about this topic. This is just a

fraction of many issues regarding the cleaning of quilts.

 

Victoria Montgomery

QRestoreaol.com

----------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 1996 14:28:40 -0600 (CST)

From: celmoreksu.edu

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: e-mail address for Debbie Roberts

Message-ID: <Pine.SOL.3.91.961211142245.24682A-100000cbs.ksu.ksu.edu>

Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

I have been lurking on this listserv because I haven't had time to read

or respond to any messages but now need help. Debbie Roberts called me

and left her e-mail address but I could not understand the part before

aol.com. Debbie, send me the address again.

Carol Elmore

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 1996 15:28:26 -0500

From: AJSNGSaol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Cleaning quilts

Message-ID: <961211152825_1354918630emout12.mail.aol.com>

I think one thing that has to be considered in whether or not you clean a

quilt is whether or not you would use it--for anything--if it isn't cleaned.

I saw a pretty, old quilt at a flea market this summer. Price was pretty

low and you could see that it was pretty. But it was the filthiest thing you

ever saw! A quilt like that might have great history behind it but there is

no way I'd consider using it for anything--to display, cut up, bed cover,

etc. unless it was washed. I didn't buy it. But next time...I just might!

Just a beginners point of view!

Nancy in Virginia (raining again)

AJSNGSaol.com

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Dec 1996 06:50:39 +0800

From: balfourkechidna.id.au (Kath Balfour)

To: QHLcuenet.com

Cc: dalecentral.murdoch.edu.au

Subject: QHL: Victoria Magazine

Message-Id: <v01540b00aed3acb20fb5[203.59.20.82]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

More greetings from sunny Western Australia, Fremantle, to be exact.

Picture this, as you warm your little tootsies, meditating by the fire in

the lands of ice & snow -- 85 degrees, balmy sea breeze, blue-blue Indian

Ocean, xmas shoppers in shorts, t-shirts & thongs...jingle bells blasting

away on department store muzak...

I'm Kath Balfour, and I am fascinated by antique textiles and processes.

But the social history of the women who made and used threads and fabrics

are the main attraction for me, and I'm thrilled to find like-minded

afficianados (sp?) here on QHL. Kris D, please stand up and take a big bow

for making it all happen. Amazing how the chorus has swelled (thought you

were a just a lone little voice in the wilderness???) It's sheer delight

being able to absorb the information and insight shared in just the few

days the list has been running!

I'm interested in finding out more about Victoria Magazine. I couldn't

locate it on www. Sounds worth subscribing to. Can anyone provide more

information?

OK, Kris, I read the rules, so here is my Once Upon a Time:

As a little girl back in the 14th c I grew up in Allentown PE. I Must've

been smitten by wanderlust in the 50s when my brave mother struck out on

her own with me for the greener pastures (mountains & forests) of Spokane

WA. The 60s I can't quite remember (but I don't think I inhaled...).

Attended EWSC in Cheney WA, majoring in art ed. Spent several years

travelling in Mexico and Central America, England, the middle east and

India. I bought a lot of textiles because they were easy to carry and the

quest enabled me to meet the local women.

In the late 70s, after many adventures and an empty bank acct, I found

myself employed as the art teacher in a tiny tech school in Kalgoorlie, a

gold-mining town in the middle of Western Australia. Met my DH out there

when art met science! I also met my best friend and business partner Lyn

Dale there. Opened a ceramics studio at an old gold mine and taught myself

the potters craft, mainly out of books. Moved to Fremantle, and earned a

living as a studio potter for 15 years until one day I 'reinvented myself'

and enrolled in law school. That was my first half century.

Now I've graduated & am working as an 'articled clerk' (read apprentice)

specialising in family law. The transition has been a real shock to my

system. As an artist, my hands & my brain worked in tandem. In law school

my hands were switched off & it was a struggle to keep my brain from just

sliding into neutral without that tactile stimulation. I was always chided

for being so 'practical' in my approach to problem solving!

On a trip home to the USA I came across a fascinating quilt top in a tiny

antique shop in Yazoo City Mississippi. It consisted of large GFG hexagons

of printed calico appliqued onto a sheet of muslin dyed green. In chasing

up info about the fabrics, the stains & the fading green dye, the world of

antique quilts began to unfold for me... Tucked inside the quilt top was a

simple newsy little letter written from a father to his grown-up daughter

on xmas eve 1932. No drama, just a little note. But what a thrill for me to

feel somehow connected to these people and wonder who and what and why and

when. I bought a lot of quilts on that trip and have been buying them ever

since.

These days I operate a small business as a sideline (saneline) with my

dearest friend, Lyn Dale. We import and sell old American quilts here in

Australia. It has been suggested by a certain DH that we are actually

quilt-addictos who support our own habit by buying for others. I guess he's

noticed we don't make any money, but every inch of space is covered with

quilts!

Happy holidays one & all!

 

Kath Balfour

Yesteryear Quilts

37 Gibson St

Hilton WA 6163

AUSTRALIA

phone +619-335-6401; fax +619-336-4230

e-mail: balfourkechidna.id.au

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 1996 17:56:01 -0500

From: "Jeri E. Smith" <smittevoicenet.com>

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Cleaning Controversy

Message-Id: <3.0.32.19961211175553.006f4574popmail.voicenet.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I have been wondering something about the cleaning of quilts. Do you all

think that the same thing applies to new and old quilts? I have always

washed my new pieced quilts (applique may be another story) in the washing

machine using a gentle cycle and some detergent. And ohmygosh, yes I have

put them in the dryer to fluff them up a bit - I do not totally dry them in

there though. I love the way they turn out that way - a little puffy.

But I would not dream of putting an antique quilt (anything older than say

20 years) in a washing machine - I would be too afraid that the fabric

would come apart -- but I would also be afraid to wash it in the tub for

fear of the stitches popping from the weight of the water. What a dilema!

Oh my - this is going to be interesting!

Jeri in Pa

smittevoicenet.com

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 96 16:59 CST

From: Mornes <dhmornesmillcomm.com>

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Books History Quilts

Message-Id: <m0vXxd2-000MdFCmill2.millcomm.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi everyone,

I just signed up to be on this list. I'm very interested in quilts used

during the time of the Civil War, expecially used in conjunction with the

Underground Railroad. I have on my Christmas list "Stitched from the Soul"

and can't wait.

I caught the tail-end of Eleanor Burns' program on PBS today, and she was

talking about the Harriet Tubman star. I'm sorry to have missed her show

today. At the end of the program I read from the credits that she used the

book: A Separate Battle, Women ... Civil War. I cant remember the ending of

the title exactly. I checked and our library has it and I'm going right

away tomorrow to check it out.

I've been purchasing quarter-yard pieces of reproduction fabrics. I someday

want to do a blue and white temperance quilt possibly in the

lady-of-the-lake pattern. One of my favorites. I saw one in an exhibit last

summer and fell in love.

How long has this list been around?

I'm sort of interested in the FQ exchange. What are the rules? I don't

pre-wash though. Will this be a problem? I wouldn't want mine washed.

Leslie in Lakeland MN

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 1996 15:59:43 -0700

From: "Mary E Scott" <mscott28cybertrails.com>

To: <QHLcue.com>

Subject: QHL: Re: Cleaning quilts

Message-Id: <199612110855.PAA24803 cybertrails.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I have a questionon the cleaning quilts theme. I often have my quilts

dry-cleaned. I have not doen anything with my old quilts because most of

them are tops. I plan on finishing the tops into a quilt before doing

anything else to them. My question is: Will it hurt or harm the fabric of

these old quilts to be dry-cleaned? I will be using cotton batts

(Quilter's Cotton) along with new muslin for the backs. I really am

curious now.

 

TIA

Mary Scott

mscott28cybertrails.com

http://inficad.com/~lightsp/suitee/index.html

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 1996 19:07:27 -0500

From: SadieRoseaol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Museums with Quilt Collections

Message-ID: <961211190724_268568541emout19.mail.aol.com>

Greetings from cold Iowa. Before we take off to go Christmas tree

shopping....

 

I would like to hear about museums that have quilt collections. This can be

a local historical society, college musuem, art institute, etc. But, please,

someplace you have visited, not just heard about. I would like to start a

list of "vacation destinations" with quilt related exhibits to view,

preferrably with historical content. Please give the name and location of

the museum, what type of collection they have: quilts, blocks, books, etc.

If the quilt related items are on display frequently....or if you can make

an appt. to view certain items. Any quilt shops nearby?? Anything else

pertinent you want to include.

Also, if you know of a show that features antique quilts, I would like to

read about it here!! Many local shows have a special area featuring antique

quilts, along with the 'new' ones. Hope this will give some of our new

members, who haven't posted yet...a topic that they can jump in on!!

TTYL.....Karan

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 1996 19:09:33 -0600

From: Rose Marie Mize <rmizeice.net>

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: History

Message-Id: <199612120109.TAA16607cube.ice.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

The book Stitched from the Soul was used in a history class at Illinois

State University. I bought one. The work these women have done is simply

incrediable. One day at work we were talking about wishing and someone

asked me what I would wish for. I said if this was purely a selfish wish it

would be to have one of my quilts hanging in the Smithsonian. How is that

for high hopes.

Kindest regards,

Rose Marie, where the Christmas cactus is just beginning to bloom.

------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 1996 20:41:21 -0500 (EST)

From: Quilting Heritage ListServ <QRSmail.albany.net>

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Cleaning quilts

Message-Id: <2.2.16.19961211203915.4ea74334mail.albany.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Well, it is probably blasphemy, but I have do admit I wash quilts in the

washing machine. Or, at least, I use the machine as a giant tub. I fill

the washer, swish the soap (everyone take a deep breath - I often use Tide

with bleach alternative) then put the quilt in and let it soak. I don't let

the machine agitate - I do that by hand - but I will let it spin the water

out. I hang them over my upstairs bannister, with a towel protecting them

from the wood. And, yes, before you ask, I have damaged quilts slightly

doing this. That's why I won't wash anyone else's quilts, just my own.

My friend Shelley (waves to Shelley!) sold me a green and red applique quilt

(civil war era?) with a lot of gorgeous quilting and some absolutely awful

staining. It was in a garage - I am really not sure what the stains are. I

have soaked it twice, once in Tide and once in a special concoction Camille

Cognac gave me. Both times I have drained coffee colored water from the

machine. I am afraid to soak it any more, I think the green may be starting

to fade. The red is *very* deteriorated, but I expected to replace that

anyway. Has anyone done anything with spot cleaning stains of unknown

origin? Becky Herdle mentions using denture cleaner in her book, and I did

do that once on a different quilt, but it made the stain whiter than the

rest of the quilt! This is *such* a beautiful quilt, I am really looking

forward to working on it. In my spare time, of course. <G>

Kris.

--------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 1996 22:10:46 -0500

From: "Jeri E. Smith" <smittevoicenet.com>

This book - Stitched from the Soul - sounds wonderful - could someone

please list the authors name.

Thanks, Jeri in Pa

smittevoicenet.com

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 1996 20:31:21 -0700

From: ayjonestacoma.nwrain.net (Yvonne Jones)

 

I am so happy with this new list, it is just the kind of thing that I'v

wanted but could not find. I feel on the other lists if I said for example

"I think that cotton batting should be used in an antique quilt top",

others do not agree or understand the value of keeping the tops intergrity.

Right at the moment I have many things going like my daughter is quite ill,

plus family demands & then there is Christmas ect. I will try to be active

on the list and hope that many others are too just to make it very

interesting.

My name is Yvonne, and I do collect antique quilts. I also have as many

books as possible about Antique quilts and I just love reading them. I love

quilting myself, and anyone that knows me will tell you that I love Red and

Green floral applique quilts from about the 1850's, and I love quilts with

LOTS of beautiful hand quilting.More from me later!

Yvonne

Gig Harbor, Wa.

QUILT-R

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 1996 22:21:23 -0500

From: QRestoreaol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: books on history of ...

Message-ID: <961211222122_1987182401emout12.mail.aol.com>

Dear Jeri;

Stitched From The Soul is authored by Gladys-Marier Fry, PH.D. and sells for

$18.98 - the ISBN# is: 0-525-48535-X

It is wonderful!

Victoria Montgomery

QRestore aol.com

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 1996 22:23:06 -0500

From: QRestoreaol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: books on history of ...

Message-ID: <961211222303_1187448006emout03.mail.aol.com>

I believe I mispelled the author's name, I'll try again:

Gladys-Marie Fry, Ph.D.

Sorry,

Victoria :)

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 1996 22:27:57 -0500

From: QuiltLineaol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Re: QHL-Digest Digest V96 #9

Message-ID: <961211222754_1987184674emout19.mail.aol.com>

To Jean -jquiltaol.com

Regarding the 1800s repros. A friend and extremely knowledgable quilter,

Sharon Newman has just (in November) come out with a new fabric line of

c1850-70 prints, through MODA/United Notions. It is wonderful, comes in

several color waves, and every fabric has a coordinate of about 6 other

fabrics. Sharon spent a lot of time researching the fabrics and colors, and

did use actual 1800's fabrics for the printing of this line.

Sharon also has a book on replicating the look of antique quilts, "Treasures

of Yesteryear" (there are 2 volumes) published by That Patchwork Place.

The repro swap sounds great - count me in.

To Nancy - AJSNGSaol.com - yes 2 adolescents! I need prayer.

Debbie

------------------------------

Date: Wed, 11 Dec 1996 21:49:59 PST

From: jadavisjuno.com (Julie A Davis)

To: QHLcue.com

Cc: QHL-Digestcue.com

Subject: Re: Washing quilts

Message-ID: <19961211.215024.3742.15.jadavisjuno.com>

Hello out there!

I have an old quilt -- 1920's I'm guessing and I washed it once with

great success. I used liquid Woolite and filled the washer tub up and agitated

the soap to really mix it up -- then I carefully pushed the quilt down into

the water and I used my bare arm (yes, I was up to my arm-pit!) and sloshed it

around a little bit -- then I let it soak about ten minutes. I let the washer

(on gentle cycle) spin out the water -- but not wring the quilt -- then let it

re-fill and sloshed it again to rinse and spun the water out. I did not let the machine spin

hard and I did not let it wring the quilt! I then gently took it out of the

machine and put it on a table covered with fat towels. I rolled the quilt (which was pretty

wet) along with the towels fairly firmly. I had an unfinished room in my basement at the time

and it was OK that the water squeezed out onto the floor (it wasn't alot

-- I'm just saying this so you won't do it the dining room!) I then unrolled it and

lifted it off of the wet towels -- I then layered the table again with more towels and

repeated the process. By this time it was about as dry as it would have been if

it had spun out in the machine. I then used 4 of those wooden drying racks (I had to

bum a couple from my Mom and a friend -- I only had one of my own) -- spaced

them slightly and put more towels on the corners of the racks so they wouldn't poke a

lump in the quilt (I've had that happen to sweaters before!) and gently laid the quilt

across the racks making sure that there wasn't an area where it was stretching/sagging .

Then, when it was about 95% dry I put it in the dryer on low heat/fluff for

just a couple of minutes to soften it up. It really looked clean and fresh and it didn't damage it at all!

Sorry this is so long -- but it was a long process to wash the quilt.

Someone tonight asked about dry cleaning -- cottons really shouldn't be dry cleaned --

the dry cleaning fluid leaves a grey tinge.

Julie Davis

jadavisjuno.com

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Dec 1996 00:18:50 -0500

From: SadieRoseaol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Victoria Magazine

Message-ID: <961212001845_1040363641emout13.mail.aol.com>

Greetings, Kath,

Here in Iowa it is cold (currently 34 degrees) with freezing rain

predicted over night. YUCK!! Don't know if I would like Christmas at the

beach...but I might like to try it!! :)

I was the one who mentioned VICTORIA magazine in one of my posts...just

got the January issue today, haven't had time to even peak inside. I don't

want to mislead you...this is not a quilting only type magazine. Actually,

it has very little about quilts. The photography is exquisite, here is the

advertising on the subscription card: Endearing fashions, a touch of lace,

old fashioned delights, the charm of yesteryear. In the fine print (good

thing I am near-sighted!!) it says $19.97 per year, USA, and $ 35.97 for

Canada and all other countries. Twelve issues per year.

I really love this magazine....they have a "writer in residence" and have

wonderful short essays written by readers. It is just a 'time out' of my

hectic everyday life...and a look at a calm, refined life I hope to achieve

(someday- maybe when my teenagers are grown!!)

The December issue is always fabulous...and it is still out at the grocery

store. If you want, I will get one and snail mail to you. A single issue is

$3.00 (US). If you want to, I would love an Australian quilting magazine in

exchange. A local shop gets the "Australian Patchwork & Quilting" and I have

several issues of it...just got the new Applique Special which is wonderful.

Fun to see a different perspective on quilting!

Well, let me know....must run. #2 son needs the computer to type up a paper

for school. TTYL.....Karan Flanscha

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Dec 1996 04:51:55 -0500

From: quiltmagmindspring.com (Jean Ann)

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: Cleaning quilts

Message-Id: <v01540b06aed58592f567[168.121.76.43]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

EEEEEK! do not dryclean old quilts. Have you ever visited the cleaning area

of a dry cleaning establishment? Dry clean is NOT a correct description of

what happens there. Everything, and I mean everything is through into a

very big commercial washing machine. Instead of water, CHEMICALS are used

to clean everything in there from your precious old quilt to someone's

bathroom rug! All in one very big commercial machine with the chemicals. I

am surprised your old tops have survived this treatment./>

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Dec 1996 06:02:35 +0000

From: Billie Corgan <Corgan-Stevenspostoffice.worldnet.att.net>

To: QHLcuenet.com

Hi all:

I will jump in here. I'm Billie Corgan and for several years ran an

antique shop in Maryland, now I'm down to a mall booth in Oklahoma. I

began quilting to learn more about the quilts for resale and now my

quilting passion has overtaken the antique search.

My method to clean old quilts is all outside in good weather. At an

auction I bought for $2.00 the old double wash tubs on a stand. Fill

both sides with lukewarm water and soak, drain, and gently lift quilt

from side to side, occasionally use just a little liquid soap. I often

use a little Calgon. I repeat this until the water runs clear not that

foul smelling yellow gunk. I gently squeeze out excess water while the

quilt is still in the tub.

To dry I lay sheets over two picnic tables, the mesh kind, carefully

lifting the quilt on to the table so not to pull stitches while its wet.

Then I cover the quilt with another sheet to prevent sun damage and

bird droppings.

This summer I bought one quilt out of a group that must have been in

that musty basement for sixty years. You could smell them ten feet

away. Should have bought more to resale, that quilt is now hanging in

my living room. I was just too scared that they would not clean up.

When I buy old quilt tops, I try to quilt first if I can, the quilting

holds the blocks together. I have had more trouble washing old quilt

tops than completed quilts.

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Dec 1996 20:09:43 +0800

From: balfourkechidna.id.au (Kath Balfour)

To: QHLcuenet.com

We wash most of the antique quilts (cotton only!) that we buy from the USA,

no matter how old they are. Not only does this clean them and take the

smell out, but the batting puffs up and they look much more attractive. Any

piecing that looks fragile is covered with a bit of muslin tacked onto it

then removed when the quilt is dry. I don't know whether we were crazy or

courageous, but we couldn't bear to touch a grubby quilt, let alone sell

it.

My partner in crime here, Lyn, has a large Sanyo top loading automatic that

does not have an agitator, the tub rotates back & forth. First she sprays

the stains, spots or marks with an ordinary pre-wash laundry spray, then

she soaks the quilt in warm water for about 24 hours in a diaper soaking

product. She may repeat this two or three times, depending on how dirty to

water is, and how stressful it is on the quilt. Very occasionally, she will

use laundry detergent. After the spin cycle, she drapes the quilt over one

a gently warm oil-filled electric radiator, turning the quilt now and again

until it's dry. The quilts dry overnight. She never hangs a damp quilt on

the line or puts it in the dryer unless its very nearly dry just to finish

it off.

Sometimes colours do run, seams do open, material does disappear but the

improvement is usually worth it.

I once tried doing this in my agitator washer and ruined a quilt! It was

pieced in a voile-like fabric and the stress of twisting and pulling tore

some of the pieces to shreds. Definately now a hanger!!!

I wash old quilt tops if they need it, and I do this in my agitator machine

just using laundry detergent. I fill the tub to the max, use cold water,

soak overnight, and finish on the lingerie cycle. I hang them with clothes

pins on the line with two cut edges together (not folded over the line!)

and tug them straight. Usually I iron them, too.

No, we absolutely don't wash any quilt or top that has satins, velvets,

wools, etc, or looks as though it may fall to pieces, or anything that is

foundation pieced (because of the weight). We get a quilt dry cleaned if it

is really musty or grubby and we can't risk washing it.

Camille Cognac's book is filled with common sense and we have referred to

it quite a lot. We like the comment she made reminding the restorer to take

a realistic look at the quilt and determine whether it is a Dior original

or a Sears housedress! Sometimes we've paid Dior prices for that Sears

housedress, however...

Now I'll jut tiptoe back in to finish addressing those Christmas cards

before I'm observed hunched over this blasted machine!

 

 

Kath Balfour

Yesteryear Quilts

37 Gibson St

Hilton WA 6163

AUSTRALIA

phone +619-335-6401; fax +619-336-4230

e-mail: balfourkechidna.id.au

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Dec 1996 08:29:29 -0500

From: QRestoreaol.com

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Response To Stains

Message-ID: <961212082928_574360929emout18.mail.aol.com>

Dear Kris;

In reference to your red & green quilt (that sounds wonderful) and the

stains. First I have a couple of questions. Do the stains appear in the red

or green fabric or are they in the white area? Also, do they appear to be in

the area where the quilt may have been folded? You may have already tried

many of the suggestions I could think of. There are many remedies others may

also suggest.

Many quilts folded and stored for years will have brown stains that often

look like furniture polish or rust but are actually caused by dye migration.

Changes in temperatures (cold and heat) can cause this to happen and most

stains caused by dye migration cannot be removed because the dye has

permanently stained adjoining fabrics. You can do more damage trying to

remove dye migration.

I f one suspects rust or blood, which can look like dye migration, there are

a couple of ways to check that. There is a poison, called Whink Rust Stain

Remover, that will remove rust in minutes but must be handled with gloves and

rinsed thoroughly, many times. Blood stains can be removed using a product

called New Again (in the women's hygiene section of the supermarket). A

method described in Camille Dalphond Cognac's book "Quilt Restoration A

Practical Guide" says "to use a Q-tip applicator to dab a small amount of New

Again onto the blood stain and rub gently with the cotton applicator to

loosen the blood. Rinse by applying a wet face cloth over the treated spot

which is resting on an absorbent bath towel."

You may have already tried this also, to spot clean an area, try isolating it

by draping it over a cooking pot and pouring warm water over the area to be

rinsed, then patting the area dry with towels. This way your not having to

treat the whole quilt.

When all else has failed, sometimes just living with and accepting the stain

as part of the quilt's charm is quite acceptable. I know many quilt

collectors and enthusiasts who don't mind a quilt with stains (it may have a

interesting story behind them) and feel if the quilt is clean and does not

have an offensive odor, they can live with that. As Camille in her book

often points out, its your decision, "who owns the quilt?"

Not sure if this provides any helpful information that you haven't already

tried, maybe someone else out there will benefit.

Victoria Montgomery

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Dec 1996 09:14:44 -0500

From: "Perry C. Trimble" <trimblepindy.net>

To: Rose Marie Mize <rmizeice.net>

CC: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: Re: QHL: History

Message-ID: <32B01354.3FAindy.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Rose Marie,

Could you possibly send the ISBN for Stitched From the Soul so others of

us have a better chance of finding it? Many thanks.

Marilyn in INdy

Old Quilters Never Die - They Just Go To Pieces

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Dec 1996 10:21:37 -0500

From: QuiltFixeraol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Re:Cleaning Controversy

Message-ID: <961212102136_1321591584emout11.mail.aol.com>

In a message dated 96-12-12 06:15:12 EST, you write:

<< I have had more trouble washing old quilt

tops than completed quilts. >>

I agree with this. Take the time to carefully go over the seams, especially

if they are hand sewn. Be very careful to lift the whole top from what ever

you are washing it in in a way that does not strain the seams.

Toni Baumgard

QuiltFixeraol.com

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Dec 1996 10:21:36 -0500

From: QuiltFixeraol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Re: Washing quilts

Message-ID: <961212102135_1220942240emout10.mail.aol.com>

I do alot of quilt washing for my customers and I have to decide how to do on

the basis of each quilt. I go from practically washing by hand to machine

washing. I base it on the condition of the quilt and how likely it is to run

or fall apart. I recently complete a 1930's quilt that a dog had used as a

bed and had chewed a couple of holes in the middle and all the sides. It is

a fan quilt and I knew I would have to cut off the edges and repair all the

rips and holes.

The quilt was so filthy that the first order was washing. With my customers

permission I washed this quilt 3 times in Tide with Bleach. I washed it in

the gentle cycle and only let it agitate for about 2 minutes. I rinsed and

rinsed. Then spun out the excess water and dryed folded with towels on top

of the dryer. This quilt was a "basket case" and it survived this ordeal and

was pretty clean afterwards. At least it did not smell anymore!

You might well ask why even bother to try to do something with it. The

owner's mother had made it and then given it to her grandson. Needless to

say this boy did not take care of it. The owner really wanted it for a

memory of her mother.

I have another quilt that is comming up that has stains on it and I am going

to soak it in BIZ to see if I can remove. They appear to be water stains and

those are very hard to get out. I will try the lemon and salt as a last

resort if this does not work. Anyone else with some ideas?

Ton Baumgard

QuiltFixeraol.com

>From No. Calif. at Spring Lakes, where we will soon need an ark!

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Dec 1996 10:44:34 -0500

From: SarahOzaol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: What a lovely list

Message-ID: <961212104432_1589250740emout13.mail.aol.com>

Hi all!

I'm just now taking the time to post. First, my name is Rose Gray --even

though my email address says it's sarah. Long story but I've had this

address a long time and it would be a real pain to change it now. I live in

Tempe Az (Phoenix) and it is warm and lovely here. But, I miss the snowy,

cold holiday weather in Ohio. I'm having a hard time adjusting to wearing

shorts and sandals when I'm christmas shopping. And, it's real interesting

that I'm not risking my life to get that extra special gift while driving on

icy roads...

I love antique quilts, sewing items, linens...you name it. I'm so glad this

list was formed, since I'm in the process of writing a book and making a

quilt to go with the book that is placed in the 1860's. The book & quilt are

going to go much more slowly come Monday, since I'm going to begin working at

the Quilted Apple in Phoenix full time. And, I'm the newsletter editor for

the Arizona Quilter's Guild (1200 members statewide) and is published

monthly. I'm also trying to figure out where I'm going to actually squeeze

some time in to quilt...UGH!!

I became interested in that time period, 1860's, when I came across an

antique quilting book at an antique shop back in Ohio. Now, the book has

taken on a life of it's own and I've found out so much information that I

never even dreamed of finding. Seems that once you look for one piece of

information you stumble across another and that leads you off in another

direction.

Thanks again, Kris, for beginning this list and I look forward to chatting

with all of you!

Rose Gray

Tempe AZ

(85 degrees, sunny and they're trucking in a ton of snow this weekend for a

christmas festival....too funny!)

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Dec 1996 11:40:15 -0500

From: SadieRoseaol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: books on history

Message-ID: <961212114008_2084968517emout20.mail.aol.com>

Here are a couple of additional titles of books about quilt history:

KANSAS QUILTS & QUILTERS by Barbara Brackman, Jennie Chinn, Gayle Davis,

Sara Farley, Nancy Hornback and Terry Thompson pub by the University of

Kansas Press 1993 ISBN # 0-7006-0585-1 paperback

This book is based on the Kansas Quilt Project and while some of the

information is very pertinent to Kansan quilters....most applies to quilters

everywhere. The Kansas Quilt Project has documented over 13,000 quilts, and

information from the huge database they have created has been translated into

interesting articles on topics from how scarce fabric was in Kansas in the

1850' and 60's- which meant little if no quiltmaking, as there was not

sufficient fabric available for clothing...to African-American quilts and

quilters.

One of the things I like the best about this book, is that it does not put

a "politically correct - 1990's slant" on women's history. Women's diaries

are quoted....but not re-interpreted. There is an excellent chapter (4) on

"Fabric and Conversation Prints" written by Terry Thompson and Barbara

Brackman. Also a chapter featuring 2 famous Kansan applique artists: Rose

Kretsinger and Charlotte Jane Whitehill, with some color photographs of

their exquisite quilts. The book is illustrated throughout with b&w and

color photos of quilts and quilters. It ends with a chapter on quilt guilds

of today, and an Appendix with information from the Kansas Quilt Project

database.

An excellent book to add to your collection, or just borrow from the

library to enjoy.

GATHERINGS: America's Quilt Heritage, text by Kathlyn F. Sullivan, based

on an exhibit currated by Paul D. Pilgrim and Gerald R. Roy, published by

the American Quilter's Society 1995 ISBN # 0-89145-860-3 $34.95 pbk

This book, and the exhibit is was based on, was a "gathering" of quilts

and information from the quilt documentation projects undertaken in many

states, starting in the late 1970's, and continuing today. There are photos

of quilts and quiltmakers which were "discovered" during the quilt

documentation days.

I was especially pleased that one of the 2 quilts chosen from the Iowa

Quilts Research Project in 1988, was one that I had documented. It was a

case where we really wished the "quilt could talk". The quilt was laid out

on several tables, pushed together. It was what I would call "Cherry Basket"

but in Barbara Brackman's "Encyclopedia of Pieced Quilt Patterns" it was

#665.2 "Basket Design". The basket triangles were turkey red, the base and

handle were dark green. The background was off white. The baskets were set

together with narrow sashing strips of a dark tan, with corner squares of

off-white. Four baskets, set on point, faced towards each other in the

center (handles to the middle). Each row out continued this placement, so as

you looked at the quilt, only the bottom quarter had quilts sitting

"upright". The 1/2 triangle blocks that filled out the edges had a simple

wavy vine with a few simple, almost kite shaped leaves. The baskets were

each "filled" with different fruits, flowers and leaves. Then, I started to

notice that some blocks (7 out of 40) did not "hold" anything. Upon closer

inspection, you could see that these blocks, too, originally were

filled....there were holes from the stitches!! By this time, the quilt had

created so much interest that a crowd gathered around it, exclaiming at it's

beauty, creativity and how good it's condition was (the quilt was made circa

1850). Then, the lady who had brought the quilt to the documentation day

stepped forward...explaining that she had brought the quilt in for a friend,

and had a letter about the quilt.

We were so glad that "this quilt could talk" as it was not signed or

dated. The quilt's maker, Eliza Hicks, died young, and her husband

re-married. The second wife got so tired of the attention given to Eliza's

quilt, that she decided to take it apart, so she could use the muslin for a

bedsheet!! Someone in the family stopped her, but not before she had removed

the applique pieces from 7 of the basket blocks!! I bet Eliza would be

pleased, that her quilt has been "re-discovered" and has now appeared in

several quilt shows, the GATHERINGS book (p92), and also on the cover of the

April 1996 Ladies Circle Patchwork Quilts magazine! (This quilt and several

others were shown to illustrate an article I wrote on the Iowa Quilts

Research Project).

The second "Iowa" quilt shown in the GATHERINGS book (p 38), is a

Schoolhouse Scrap Quilt, made by Hannah Stone in approximately 1900. This

quilt was chosen as the "poster child" of the Iowa Quilts Research Project's

exhibit: "The Thread That Remains" in 1990. Many of us who worked during the

IQRP chose to stitch our own version of this quilt (a single schoolhouse

block, surrounded by rows of rectangular scrap pieces) as a momento of our

participation in this project.

The GATHERINGS book combines information from 59 different quilt

projects, and there are tables at the end of the book, with information on

each of these. Some are ongoing, some were for a limited time. It also

tells whether the project published a book or catalog, and if the data

gathered is available on computer. There are contact names and addresses for

each. There is now an interest in combining this wealth of information in a

central source. Terri Nyman, of Ladies Circle Patchwork Quilts magazine, has

been featuring a different state research project in each issue of the

magazine, so that interest would not dwindle in these efforts. So much about

quilts and the women who made them have been recovered by these documentation

projects. It also has given the public a higher opinion of the value of the

quilts. One of the lady's, who's family quilts I had documented, told me

later that her grandson took one of the old quilts out to lay on when he

changed the oil in his car <gasp. But, he saw the label we had sewn on the

back, stating that this quilt was registered with the State Historical

Society, and even though he wasn't quite sure what that meant, he decided he

better not use it!!

Sorry this has run on so long...obviously, I have a personal interest in

these 2 quilts!! But, even if they had not been included.... GATHERINGS is

an excellent book to add to your collection. Obviously, available through

the AQS, and at a discount if you are a member, and order 6 or more books.

Karan from gray and gloomy Iowa

** Sign and date your quilts!!**

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Dec 1996 20:03:17 -0500 (EST)

From: Susan Hood <vh22689concentric.net>

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Intro and stains

Message-Id: <199612130103.UAA15588cliff.cris.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi All,

I'm probably mostly a lurker but thought I should at least introduce

myself. My name is Sue and I live in Charlotte, N.C. I have a husband and

a 7-year-old daughter. I teach English to international students at the

local university (no, not a university professor, just a lowly part-timer,

but it suits me). I do quilt, though very slowly. Right now I'm working on

a rather complicated applique which consists of several scenes of a close

friend's tree farm and flower gardens. Not exactly a reproduction antique

quilt, but I am very interested in the history of quilts and, in truth, the

history of all needlework done by women. (Yes, I get Piecework!)

I am fascinated by the idea that women create beauty even in the

most impoverished of circumstances. It is cross-cultural. I'm eager to

read many of the books thus far mentioned for that reason. [By the way, for

those you who might not know, most public libraries can get almost any book

in print (excluding rare and very valuable books) for free, through

inter-library loan. Some libraries may charge a fee to cover postage costs.

I used to be a librarian in a different life.]

About washing and stains--not sure what the stains are in Kris's

quilt, but there is a sort of rust colored stain caused by a mineral residue

from soap or water from the last washing. I heard that soaking the stain

with a Ph balanced soap such as Woolite will get rid of it. I tried this on

an antique lace table cloth, and much to my amazement, it worked! However,

I soaked the whole thing, not just a spot, so don't know if an isolated

soaked area would come out lighter than the rest of the fabric or not.

Also, it took two days, and that long a soak surely didn't help the

tablecloth. Does anyone else have more detailed info on this?

Sue, baking Christmas cookies in Charlotte

 

------------------------------

Date: Thu, 12 Dec 1996 19:09:40 -0600

From: Rose Marie Mize <rmizeice.net>

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Author

Message-Id: <199612130109.TAA27370cube.ice.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Stitched from the Soul, Slave Quilts from the Ante-Bellum South by

Gladys-Marie Fry. PhD, Dutton Studio Books, ISBN 0-525-48535-X. This book

is wonderful. The workwomanship in these quilts is breathtaking. How about

page 23, she was 13 years old!

Rose Marie

Date: Thu, 12 Dec 1996 21:11:57 -0600

From: R D <holmrexecpc.com>

To: QHLcue.com

Hi --

This is an idea that I shared with another mail list. I think the idea

would work the same, but with an antique quilt!

>

> Hi All,

> With the talk that has been going on lately about quilt screen savers,> I'd like to pass on to you all an idea that just came to me. For a

> Christmas present for my husband, I had a cute picture of our son put

> onto a mousepad. It turned out really cute. I know he'll love it for

> his office. Wouldn't it be neat to take a picture of your favorite

> quilt and have it printed onto a mousepad? I also had a picture of the

> three of us put onto a mug, and on the other side it says World's Best

> Dad. You could also make a mug up with your favorite quilt on it. This

> would make a nice present for a fellow quilter or secret sister. World's

> Best Quilter????? <G>

> I had this done at a little speciality shop in a mall. I think

> Walgreens might be able to do the mug. I'm not sure about the mouse

> pad.

> I like this idea. I might do a quick mug up for a girlfriend. She'd

> like it for work.

> It is really hard to watch ER and type at the same time!

> Signing off --

> Donna in Wisconsin

> I'm going to post this on a couple of lists, so you might read it again.

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Dec 1996 14:12:59 +0800

From: Bev McGrath <bevmcgraiinet.net.au>

To: QHLcue.com

Hi everybody

My name is Bev McGrath and I live in Perth, Western Australia. I found out

about this webside from my dear cyberfriend, Jean Stapel, who suggested I

look it up. How glad I am to have found you. Also through this, I have

been in contact with Kathy Balfour, who lives nearby in Fremantle, and we

are going to meet for coffee next week.

I have been quilting for about 5 years, and after making quilts for all the

family, decided to add more depth to my knowledge, hence my interest in

quilt history. Australian quilt history is quite different to American, so

I hope to be able to contribute words of wisdom now and then.

I am a committe member of the Western Australian Quilters' Association Inc.,

which is a dynamic and interesting group to belong to. If anyone is coming

to Perth at any time (and that is not as far fethched as it seems), please

contact us, we will ensure you a warm and friendly welcome and make sure you

do not have time to feel lonely, there is so much going on. Our address is

PO Box 188, Subiaco, 6904, Western Australia, or you can contact me by email.

Best wishes

Bev McGrath in sunny Western Australia

bevmcgraiinet.net.au

Bev McGrath in sunny Perth, Western Australia

bevmcgraiinet.net.au

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Dec 1996 06:26:06 -0500

From: AJSNGSaol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Displaying antique quilts

Message-ID: <961213062605_1686281402emout06.mail.aol.com>

I would like to hear how some of you have displayed your quilts. Do you

store them in a cabinet such as a pie safe, or hang them on the wall? I've

seen quilts displayed that are gathered at the top and hung on walls. Are

there some ideas that are decorative but not harmful to the quilts? Are

there good ways to display quilts that are not pretty on all sides? I'd like

some ideas. I love to have my quilts out where I can see them, but obviously

they can't all hang on the wall....

Thanks, Nancy in foggy raining Virginia

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Dec 1996 08:02:07 -0500 (EST)

From: Quilting Heritage ListServ <QRSmail.albany.net>

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Quilter's Mousepads

Message-Id: <2.2.16.19961213075938.20c74240mail.albany.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Great minds think alike! I just ordered myself a quilters mousepad from

http://www.FrontNet.com/~persona/quilting/design_plus/mousepads.html

There are three designs there, plus one they will cover with cloth you

provide.

Ususal disclaimers apply - I don't know these people, in fact, I haven't

received my mousepad yet, so I can't even recommend them. But if you want

to take a $7.50 chance, here is where to go.

Kris

Date: Fri, 13 Dec 1996 08:44:09 -0500

From: quiltmagmindspring.com (Jean Ann)

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: making quilts from old blocks

Message-Id: <v01540b0aaed70d64a6c7[168.121.76.43]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

One of the things I like to do is rescue old quilt blocks and make quilts

out of them. They always seem so sad just stacked up in plastic baggies at

the quilt show....they need to be a quilt.

It is wonderful to be able to purchase reproduction fabrics so the old

quilts can continue to look old.

I recently bought two sets of blocks at the Quilt Festival in Houston.

There were 20 Monkey Wrench blocks which were set using a blue sashing. I

had a perfect piece of fabric in my stash that was about 10 years old for

the border. It is a really neat little quilt.

Now i have 13 very small fan blocks in fancy fabrics to become a Victorian

Miniature. They are sewed over a muslin foundation.

Does the QHC home page have a way we could send gifs or jpegs and have some

of our restoration or salvage projects shown?

I also collect long forgotten Nine Patch quilt tops, humble as they are,

and finish them into quilts.

Jean Ann Eitel

America's Favorite Quilter

http://www.quiltmag.com

Let's Talk Quilting: dal.net IRC - /join #quilttalk

http://www.quiltmag.com/QuiltTalk/

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Dec 1996 09:00:41 4

From: "Beth Allen" <bga22enter.net>

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: displaying quilts

Message-Id: <199612131400.JAA20163mail.enter.net>

I have quilts displayed all through my house. I just counted the ones

hanging on my walls and there are 13. Every time I think my walls are

full I see a new space for more.

I have a two story foyer where I hang a full size Baltimore Album

quilt on one wall and two other lap size quilts on the other walls.

I try to think about how the sun will hit a quilt before I hang it up

and usually can prevent fading. But if I really want a quilt

somewhere it goes there. These are quilts that I have made, not

antique quilts that I would be much more careful about hanging.

I do have several antique quilts and I have them hanging over a quilt

rack or a chair away from sunlight.

Beth Allen

in rainy (again) Pa.

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Dec 1996 09:20:06 -0500

From: BBMorrisaol.com

 

Hi,

I'm new to the group but joined just in time to read all of the debate over

how to clean old quilts. A way that was suggested to me when I was going through the training for our state documentation program was to use a very gentle soap, such as Orvus, in the bathtub. The essential part of this was to use a sheet under the quilt so that you could lift it out without puting any strain on the quilt. The sheet would hold all of the weight. They also suggested pressing out as much water as possible by hand and then by covering it with large towels and pressing by hand again before lifting it out. I tried this and it worked well. I then spread it out on a clean sheet on my

deck with another sheet on top to protect it from both the sun and the birds.

I checked it frequentyl and turned it frequently. When it was dry to the

touch, I put it in the dryer on gentle cycle with very low heat to be sure

the heavy batting was dry and to fluff it up.

A little about me. I am 58 and love quilts. I grew up in the mountains of

SE Ky, near the TN and VA borders. There were lots of quilts in my family

and I saw my aunts and great grandmother making them. I didn't care anything

about them until I married and moved out of the area. My MIL is from WV and

never stopped quilting. From her I learned that it is a labor of love, not

of necessity any more. I have been quilting now for just over 20 years and

teaching quilting for various groups for about 16. I now run a retreat once

a year for about 150. I am in process of making a quilt for each of my 9

grandchildren. Just need to finish the binding to be finished with the one

for #3. Still have a lot to go. They are all picking out the patterns they

want. I hope to instill in them my love of quilts and that, just maybe,

their quilts will someday be a part of their families heritage.

Sorry to be so long winded, but am very glad I found this group.

Barbara in GA

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Dec 1996 09:27:42 -0500

From: Laurajbraol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Displaying antique quilts

Message-ID: <961213092741_369460098emout08.mail.aol.com>

Hi all,

I have a collection of red and green floral appliqued antique quilts from the

mid 1800's and I try to display as many as I can. I have one wall that will

accommodate one of these large quilts, so I use that to rotate my favorites.

I hand sew a sturdy muslin sleeve on the back of the quilt and use a strong

brass curtain rod to hold up the quilt. There is no direct sunlight on this

wall. I also fold one quilt over the stair railing; I have an oak quilt rack

in my great room that holds four quilts; another in my bedroom that holds

three; there is one on the guest room bed because it seldogets used; and the

rest of the collection is folded and displayed in a cupboard in my quilting

room. Laura in Tampa

------------------------------

Date: 13 Dec 96 09:29:50 EST

From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037CompuServe.COM>

To: "INTERNET:QHLcue.com" <QHLcue.com>

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: Washing quilts

Message-ID: <961213142949_75444.1037_FHQ52-2CompuServe.COM>

remember that cotton is stronger wet if new and weaker when wet when oldThis is

True of all cellulose fibers. Wool and silk are of course extremely weak when

wet at any age. That is why we wash textiles fully supported on screening and

tip the screen and never take a textile out of the water unsupported. There are

good conservation manuals available but vacumming textiles is actually the best

bet for all historic pieces wet cleaning is always risky. Unlike turkeys, they

do not have pop up timers which tell us when they have had too much acid,

ultraviolet etc. Ph meters are extremely helpful in analysising whether and

what to do with the water in terms of ionization.

Hope this is helpful

------------------------------

Date: 13 Dec 96 09:29:57 EST

From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037CompuServe.COM>

To: "INTERNET:QHLcue.com" <QHLcue.com>

Subject: Re: QHL: Cleaning Controversy

Message-ID: <961213142956_75444.1037_FHQ52-6CompuServe.COM>

Cotton and linen are stronger when wet when NEW but weaker when wet when over 25

years old. You really run some risks washing cellulose. Wool and silk are of

course extremely weak when wet at any age. That is why we wash textiles fully

supported on screening and tip the screen and never take a textile out of the

water unsupported. There are good conservation manuals available but vacumming

textiles is actually the best bet for all historic pieces wet cleaning is always

risky. Unlike turkeys, they do not have pop up timers which tell us when they

have had too much acid, ultraviolet etc. Ph meters are extremely helpful in

analysising whether and what to do with the water in terms of ionization.

Hope this is helpful

------------------------------

Date: 13 Dec 96 09:29:48 EST

From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037CompuServe.COM>

To: "INTERNET:QHLcue.com" <QHLcue.com>

Subject: Re: QHL: Re:Cleaning Controversy

Message-ID: <961213142947_75444.1037_FHQ52-1CompuServe.COM>

remember that cotton is stronger wet if new and weaker when wet when oldThis is

True of all cellulose fibers. Wool and silk are of course extremely weak when

wet at any age. That is why we wash textiles fully supported on screening and

tip the screen and never take a textile out of the water unsupported. There are

good conservation manuals available but vacumming textiles is actually the best

bet for all historic pieces wet cleaning is always risky. Unlike turkeys, they

do not have pop up timers which tell us when they have had too much acid,

ultraviolet etc. Ph meters are extremely helpful in analysising whether and

what to do with the water in terms of ionization.

Hope this is helpful

------------------------------

Date: 13 Dec 96 09:29:54 EST

From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037CompuServe.COM>

To: "INTERNET:QHLcue.com" <QHLcue.com>

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: Washing quilts

Message-ID: <961213142953_75444.1037_FHQ52-4CompuServe.COM>

Cotton and linen are stronger when wet when NEW but weaker when wet when over 25

years old. You really run some risks washing celluloseTrue of all cellulose

fibers. Wool and silk are of course extremely weak when wet at any age. That is

why we wash textiles fully supported on screening and tip the screen and never

take a textile out of the water unsupported. There are good conservation

manuals available but vacumming textiles is actually the best bet for all

historic pieces wet cleaning is always risky. Unlike turkeys, they do not have

pop up timers which tell us when they have had too much acid, ultraviolet etc.

Ph meters are extremely helpful in analysising whether and what to do with the

water in terms of ionization.

Hope this is helpful

------------------------------

Date: 13 Dec 96 09:29:52 EST

From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037CompuServe.COM>

 

Cotton and linen are stronger when wet when NEW but weaker when wet when over 25 years old. You really run some risks washing celluloseTrue of all cellulose fibers. Wool and silk are of course extremely weak when wet at any age. That is why we wash textiles fully supported on screening and tip the screen and never take a textile out of the water unsupported. There are good conservation manuals available but vacumming textiles is actually the best bet for all historic pieces wet cleaning is always risky. Unlike turkeys, they do not have pop up timers which tell us when they have had too much acid, ultraviolet etc.

Ph meters are extremely helpful in analysising whether and what to do with the

water in terms of ionization.

Hope this is helpful

-------------------------

------------------------------

Date: 13 Dec 96 09:29:55 EST

From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037CompuServe.COM>

To: "INTERNET:QHLcue.com" <QHLcue.com>

Subject: Re: QHL: Cleaning quilts

Message-ID: <961213142955_75444.1037_FHQ52-5CompuServe.COM>

Cotton and linen are stronger when wet when NEW but weaker when wet when over 25

years old. You really run some risks washing celluloseTrue of all cellulose

fibers. Wool and silk are of course extremely weak when wet at any age. That is

why we wash textiles fully supported on screening and tip the screen and never

take a textile out of the water unsupported. There are good conservation

manuals available but vacumming textiles is actually the best bet for all

historic pieces wet cleaning is always risky. Unlike turkeys, they do not have

pop up timers which tell us when they have had too much acid, ultraviolet etc.

Ph meters are extremely helpful in analysising whether and what to do with the

water in terms of ionization.

Hope this is helpful

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Dec 1996 10:18:42 -0500

From: Barb Garrett <bgarrettfast.net>

 

It is so exciting to have a place to share about quilt history with

people who will enjoy and understand the obsession.

Last week I had the wonderful opportunity to attend a Quilt Workshop at

the DAR Museum in Washington, DC. I highly recommend it to antique quilt

lovers.

This is what their flyer says -

1) View a selection of approximately 25 quilts and related textiles

from the museum's extensive collection.

2) Programs are held on the first Thursday of most months and begin at

10:30 am.

3) There is a $15.00 fee and reservations are required. Call museum at

(202)879-3241.

4) DAR Museum located at 1776 D Steet NW, Washington, DC

What we experienced -- We sat around a large table with white gloves on

and got close up and personal views of 25 quilts. The volunteer docent told

us information about the quilts - often donated by the family of the maker -

and we got to explore the quilting, applique, piecing, stuffed work -

everything. All of the quilts we saw in our collection were made between

1830 and 1900. You don't get to choose your quilts, but my guess is they

are all wonderful. The hour and a half went much too quickly, and you are

not allowed to take pictures anywhere in the museum - this was the only

drawback to me because I find having a picture helps my mind recall the

actual quilt. I think the docent said they have about 200 quilts in the

museum collection, and the money from the workshops is used for textile

preservation.

We then went to 7 Period Rooms - rooms named for the states - which

were set up as bedrooms and had quilts in them. My personal favorite was an

applique from Texas with documentation that it was machine quilted in 1860

on the first sewing machine brought to the German Hill Country of Texas.

The museum also had about 15 quilts on display, so a very full 2 hours.

This was my first visit to the DAR, and I highly recommend the workshop

for those who like old quilts and their histories.

Barb in southeastern PA

<bgarrettfast.net>

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Dec 1996 10:00:29

From: "MARY PERSYN" <MPERSYNwesemann.valpo.edu>

To: qhlcuenet.com

 

A little about myself. I work as a law librarian to support my

quilting habit. This habit started out being just fabric and books

(the bibliography is now up to 20 pages), but I have gotten interested

in old quilts and would like to be able to buy all that I see. Since

I can't afford the quilts, I've been picking up tops, many of which

just need someone to love them since they are in bad shape.

Yesterday, I stopped at an antique store in Brookston, Indiana, and

bought a string pieced lone star (just the star) done in 30s fabrics.

It still has some of the pieces of newspaper on the back that the

maker used to foundation piece it. I belong to the String-A-Long

Quilt Guild in Valparaiso and so could not leave this string-pieced

star behind.

On the washing quilts thread, have you tried Orvis horse paste? It

does a good job of cleaning the quilts and is very gentle. If you

have a tack store in your area you can buy a gallon of it for little

more than a small container of it costs you in a quilt store. A

friend (Hi, Pat) and I split a gallon of it that we purchased at

Troyers in Shipsewanna, IN.

Looking forward to some interesting discussions,

Mary

Mary G. Persyn mpersynwesemann.valpo.edu

Law Librarian (219) 465-7838

School of Law Library FAX: (219) 465-7917

Valparaiso University

Valparaiso, IN 46383

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Dec 1996 18:46:18 +0000

From: "Kathleen Duvall" <nanwkshplc.gulfnet.com>

 

Jean -- can you explain what you mean by sewing old blocks over

muslin? I bought a box of old quilt blocks at an acution that are

probably from the 40's. They're a star pattern and if I sew them

together, the points will be in the seam. Just today I came across

a fantastic find! I bought yards and yards of 30's and 40's fabric

in multi-yard lengths, uncut -- just the thing to use to make the

quilt blocks into a quilt, but I haven't been able to figure out how

to put the blocks together without the points being in the seam.

Thanks in advance.

Kathleen in Florida

------------------------------

Date: Fri, 13 Dec 1996 19:34:18 -0500 (EST)

From: Quilting Heritage ListServ <QRSmail.albany.net>

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: QHL home page

Message-Id: <2.2.16.19961213193152.1b37145email.albany.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

To answer Jean Ann's question, yes, QHL has a home page and I would love to

post pictures of any projects on it! I was going to wait until after

Christmas and then post a request for suggestions as to how best to use our

home page. I thought maybe an FAQ type section on our cleaning discussion?

Maybe an FAQ on books, although we haven't really discussed them very much

yet. (By the way, I checked the latest AQS listing and they do not sell

Stitched from the Soul. You *can* get it from http://www.amazon.com for

$17.96, though.)

Kris

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 14 Dec 1996 17:18:02 +0800

From: balfourkechidna.id.au (Kath Balfour)

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: mpersynwesemann.valpo.edu

Message-Id: <v01540b04aed8202179dc[203.59.25.10]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi to Mary Persyn

This 20 page bibliography of yours sounds interesting! I wonder if you

have any ideas as a librarian about how we might go about compiling a

bibliography just of quilt history books through this list and keeping it

updated.

Does anyone else on the list have experience doing this? Everyone seems

interested in the books!. So much book info has just snowballed in the past

couple of weeks I'm afraid it will soon be impossible to keep up with

recommended titles.

Are there any web sites that can accommodate such a biblio? Or anyone

experienced & interested in setting one up?

Just a thought.

 

Kath Balfour

Yesteryear Quilts

37 Gibson St

Hilton WA 6163

AUSTRALIA

phone +619-335-6401; fax +619-336-4230

e-mail: balfourkechidna.id.au

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 14 Dec 1996 08:39:24 -0500

From: AJSNGSaol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Quilting Long Ago

Message-ID: <961214083923_840779389emout04.mail.aol.com>

Hi,

I've been learning alot in the past few days about what supplies a quilter

"must" have. I've been given dozens of suggestions which are all very much

appreciated, but it occured to me that women who quilted, say 50-100 years

ago, didn't have all these fancy gadgets. What did they use? I'd be

interested to hear from some of you who know quite a bit about quilting years

ago have to say. Also, what types of equipment do the Amish use? Do they

use alot of the new supplies available to quilters? And do they still use

treadle sewing machines at times, or is most of their work done strictly by

hand?

Thanks, Nancy

AJSNGSaol.com

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 14 Dec 1996 09:14:45 -0500

From: JQuiltaol.com

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: mouse pads

Message-ID: <961214091444_34049543emout20.mail.aol.com>

I really hesitated before I posted this message...because I would like to

keep this list free from all of the craft and quilt subjects that are on the

many, many quilting lists.

So It will be a one time thing ...

Buy a cheapo/generic type mouse pad and look in your stash for a fabric that

says something to you or about the person to whom you are sending the pad .

Heat and bond the fabric and then cut it to the size of the pad....peel off

the heat & bond paper and iron the fabric to the mouse pad...I have made

several with convesational(novelty)prints.

Jean

jquiltaol.com

------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 14 Dec 1996 19:44:52 +0000

From: "The Garretts" <bgarrettpo.fast.net>

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Quilting Long Ago

 

Also, what types of equipment do the Amish use? Do they use alot of the new

supplies available to quilters? And do they still use treadle sewing machines

at times, or is most of their work done strictly by hand?

My comments -

I can only speak about the Amish ladies I have talked to in Lancaster

County, PA, and this is an ongoing research effort of mine, but here is what I

have learned.

The Amish use all the different fabrics that we use - I have watched Old

Order Amish ladies purchase Mumms, Gutchens, Hoffmans, etc. They use them in

their business because they are popular and sell well. Their quilts have

polyester batting, and they use both 100% cotton and cotton poly blends. One

lady said sometimes the colors are better in the blends, and they don't wrinkle

so much, which customers - keep in mind these are not quilters - like.

They use commercially produced patterns - one of the most popular are the

series of applique books to make quilts that are published by Good Books in

Intercourse, PA.

I have never asked about rotary cutters, my guess is yes they do use them,

but I will check when I go looking in shops again after Christmas.

I did ask two different ladies about treadle sewing machines. They both

said some of the older ladies still use treadles, but many use regular sewing

machines run off compressed air, which is piped into their houses to run irons,

refrigerators, washing machines, and sewing machines. What prompted this

question was in one shop advertising only Amish made items, there were

applique wall hangings with machine button hole stitch used to attach the

appliques. I didn't think a treadle could do that, so asked.

The Amish have never hand pieced their quilts. Traditional Lancaster

Amish quilts - those made between 1870 and 1940, are machine pieced and

elaborately hand quilted. The bindings are attached by machine. Since the

Amish did not start quilting until after the sewing machine was invented and

widely distributed - 1850 to 1860 - there was no reason for them to piece by

hand. The Germans brought a tradition of coverlet weaving to the new world,

and learned to quilt from their English and French neighbors.

If anyone has other questions, I will gladly add them to my list for when

I visit the shops again - I live about an hour away. Also, if anyone lives in

or near the Amish communities of Ohio or Indiana, I would enjoy knowing if

these same statements are true there. Thanks.

Barb in southeastern PA

<bgarrettfast.net>

------------------------------

Date: Sat, 14 Dec 1996 18:33:40 +0000

From: Bev Jordan <qultfixdirectcon.net>

To: bgarrettfast.net

 

Barb,

First I would like to thank you for your information about Amish quilts. One

question

I have is what do they use on the backs of the old quilts? I've seen some of the

newer Amish quilts and of course looked at the back, but most of the old Amish

quilts I've seen is usually in pictures or galleries and there's not much

opportunity to see what's on the back.

On my future "to do" list, I hope to make an Amish-like wool quilt but before I

start it, I want to know better what is used for the batting and backing. Or, is

a wool quilt warm enough to do without batting and then would it really be a

quilt?

Thanks for your information so far and keep it up.

Bev (I'll introduce myself later, just lurking right now)

Date: Sun, 15 Dec 1996 04:55:57 +0000

From: Susan Nixon <Desertskyworldnet.att.net>

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Quilting Long Ago

Message-ID: <19961215045522.AAF5281LOCALNAME>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>From: AJSNGSaol.com Nancy asked:

>it occured to me that women who quilted, say 50-100 years

>ago, didn't have all these fancy gadgets. What did they use?

One thing they used was tin quilt stencils with holes punched in them. My

grandfather made a few simple ones for my grandmother. My aunt said her

mother would use clean ashes patted through to mark her patterns. I always

thought this must have been very hard. I don't think she marked whole tops

at one time! I've heard of people using cinnamon or graphite. It seems to

me that cinnamon would have been very expensive to use as quilt marking.

Most often, my mother drew her own designs on paper, and just like I often

do, taped it to a large window and traced over it. My mother also used my

dad's blue painter's chalk (my dad painted signs for a living) with my

grandmother's stencils. I believe that today if you buy "pounce" powder,

that is what it is. =)

If my mother were alive today, she would be 84, so we are still talking

"old" here. =) Unfortunately, my mother died when I was nine and most of

this information comes from an older sister or my aunt, not from learning at

my mother's knee. 8(

I've also seen tin signature stencils used for quilts. I believe these were

more common in areas where people had money to spend for extras. Young

women would have some kind of signature and artwork done in tin. Then they

inked over it on quilt blocks that were made for others, or traded with friends.

I do know that my mother swore by "Wiss" scissors. I have a pair myself

from the 70s - that's 1970s! She also used thread from the J P Coats

Company - 100% cotton on wooden spools, of course. =) I have a quilt they

tied in the 30s with embroidery thread - 6 strands - probably DMC as that's

what Mama always used for her embroidery projects.

Susan in Sunny Phoenix, Arizona, USA

 

 

Date: Sun, 15 Dec 1996 07:48:22 -0500

From: quiltmagmindspring.com (Jean Ann)

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: old time quilting stuff

Message-Id: <v01540b02aed9a2b64965[168.121.76.43]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I have seen or been told that:

They used a pencil with a string tied on and then a pin to hold it in the

center of a paper to make a circle. there were no compass tools on the

prairie. This was for big circles. small circles could be traced around

plates, cans, anything round.

The used brown butcher paper to make most of their patterns.

They paper pieced over letters and old newspapers or *domestic* which is

what they called muslin..

They cut templates from carboard boxes.

None of this ever went to the curb side recyclers...they did their own

recycling of everything.

They carded their own cotton with a hand held carder which looks like a big

doggie comb.

They grew their own cotton or bought it bulk from a neighbor or the local

cotton gin.

They were sometimes able to get patterns from newspapers or ladies

magazines or farm journals when available and affordable.

They shared a lot. They never worried about copyright or if their neighbor

was *using* or *stealing* their new quilt design.

Back then, quilting was sharing. Sharing of materials, designs, and sharing

of lives.

Jean Ann Eitel

America's Favorite Quilter

 

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 15 Dec 1996 09:45:13 -0500

From: Kathy <DeSchuitix.netcom.com>

 

Does anyone know if the DAR Museum has a web site?

--

Kathy in NH

DeSchuitix.netcom.com

Barb Garrett wrote:

>

> It is so exciting to have a place to share about quilt history with

> people who will enjoy and understand the obsession.

> Last week I had the wonderful opportunity to attend a Quilt Workshop at

> the DAR Museum in Washington, DC. I highly recommend it to antique quilt

> lovers.

> This is what their flyer says -

> 1) View a selection of approximately 25 quilts and related textiles

> from the museum's extensive collection.

> 2) Programs are held on the first Thursday of most months and begin at

> 10:30 am.

> 3) There is a $15.00 fee and reservations are required. Call museum at

> (202)879-3241.

> 4) DAR Museum located at 1776 D Steet NW, Washington, DC

> What we experienced -- We sat around a large table with white gloves on

> and got close up and personal views of 25 quilts. The volunteer docent told

> us information about the quilts - often donated by the family of the maker -

> and we got to explore the quilting, applique, piecing, stuffed work -

> everything. All of the quilts we saw in our collection were made between

> 1830 and 1900. You don't get to choose your quilts, but my guess is they

> are all wonderful. The hour and a half went much too quickly, and you are

> not allowed to take pictures anywhere in the museum - this was the only

> drawback to me because I find having a picture helps my mind recall the

> actual quilt. I think the docent said they have about 200 quilts in the

> museum collection, and the money from the workshops is used for textile

> preservation.

> We then went to 7 Period Rooms - rooms named for the states - which

> were set up as bedrooms and had quilts in them. My personal favorite was an

> applique from Texas with documentation that it was machine quilted in 1860

> on the first sewing machine brought to the German Hill Country of Texas.

> The museum also had about 15 quilts on display, so a very full 2 hours.

> This was my first visit to the DAR, and I highly recommend the workshop

> for those who like old quilts and their histories.

>

> Barb in southeastern PA

> <bgarrettfast.net>

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 15 Dec 1996 10:50:44 -0500

From: ektuppergarden.net (EK Tupperw)

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Re: Quilt History Books

Message-ID: <19961215155043143.AAA199wayne-ppp03.garden.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Kath Balfour wrote:

> Everyone seems

>interested in the books!. So much book info has just snowballed in the past

>couple of weeks I'm afraid it will soon be impossible to keep up with

>recommended titles.

>

>Are there any web sites that can accommodate such a biblio? Or anyone

>experienced & interested in setting one up?

>

>Kath Balfour

>

 

I have a new web site at http://206.26.128.1/users/ektupper/

I am very interested in quilting history books and any stories regarding

quilting. I am making a listing of them and I will be putting this on my

web page soon and adding to it often. If anyone has any books they would

like to add to the list, please let me know.

Betty :)

 

Date: 15 Dec 96 10:53:24 EST

From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037CompuServe.COM>

To: "INTERNET:QHLcue.com" <QHLcue.com>

Subject: Re: QHL: old time quilting stuff

Message-ID: <961215155323_75444.1037_FHQ29-1CompuServe.COM>

Some of your old time quilting stuff info was very enjoyable to read but some

of the information needs a bit more documentation if you are going to make

statements about textile productions. By the time we get to the 1840's and

1850's even in the most remote areas there isnt much evidence of some of the

practises you mention like hand carding of cotton for bats if You have

specific referrences that would be wonderful and I am sure they are out there

but it is important that we done make generalizations based on romanitc notions

that has been the problem with studying textiles over the last century. If and

when we find ducomented instances we need to referrence them and foot note them

so we can start to understand who was using hand cards and who was buying

batting and what type of textile production was regional. We need to do it

right so that our knowledge of how quilting fits into material culture of a

people and a place gives us a better understanding of our lives today.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 15 Dec 1996 11:02:25 PST

From: jadavisjuno.com (Julie A Davis)

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Retreat

Message-ID: <19961215.112529.13998.2.jadavisjuno.com>

To Barbara in GA.....

Tell more about your retreat for 150...............!!!!

Thanks,

Julie Davis

jadavisjuno.com

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 15 Dec 1996 12:52:08 -0500

From: CTislanderaol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Amish-like wool quilt

Message-ID: <961215125207_235553122emout18.mail.aol.com>

In response to Bev (quiltfixdirectcon.net) and Barb (bgarrettfast.net):

Bev said she hopes to make an Amish-like wool quilt and wants to know what is

used for batting and backing.

 

I had this same idea of making a pre 1940s Amish-like quilt. I purchased

white wool yardage and dyed it with natural dyes. I used madder, onion skins,

mistletoe, and cochineal with alum mordant. The colors are beautiful. I

machine pieced a small top in a brick pattern with black commercial wool

yardage for one brick row and a wide border. The top is good looking, but I

am stopped for the moment trying to decide on the proper backing, batting,

and thread color for quilting. Roberta Horton says in *An Amish Adventure*,

second edition, "Amish quilts are flat. To achive the same look today, use a

cotton batt or a piece of flannel. Dark or black thread was used for the

quilting stitches."

I worry that the dark thread will look garish where it crosses the light

yellow-green of the mistletoe rectangles. Also, my quilting stitches are not

perfect yet and every flaw will show up. (I could pretend I was a young Amish

girl just learning the art.) It is hard to take the plunge.

Christine T. in the California Delta

CTislanderaol.com

 

 

 

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 15 Dec 1996 13:38:12 +0000

From: "The Garretts" <bgarrettpo.fast.net>

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Quilting Long Ago

Message-Id: <m0vZLXD-0003j7Cfast.net>

Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII

Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Bev wrote -

First I would like to thank you for your information about Amish quilts. One

question I have is what do they use on the backs of the old quilts? I've seen

some of the newer Amish quilts and of course looked at the back, but most of the

old Amish quilts I've seen is usually in pictures or galleries and there's not

much opportunity to see what's on the back.

 

My comments -

I too am frustrated that you can't see the backs of traditional Amish

quilts when viewed in galleries or books. I always assumed they were plain,

but...

I have had the privilege of seeing, and touching, two traditional quilts,

made by the same lady in Narvon, Lancaster County, PA, circa 1920s.

During a documentation day about 5 years ago, a man and his wife - in

their 60s I would guess, brought in a mint condition, wool, center diamond

Amish quilt. It had been made by his grandmother when he was either born or

was a young child - it was something she did for all the grandchildren. This

was a full sized quilt, not a crib quilt, and was probably intended as a quilt

for use when the grandchild was an adult.

The man was not Amish - which is why he could bring the quilt - and he had

never used it because to him it was too beautiful to use - emerald green and

rich purple. You could tell he and his wife treasured the quilt.

We got a very big surprise when we flipped the quilt over to document the

back - it was a floral print!! Think big mum type flowers in burgandy and

grey. Not much contrast in the flowers - they don't stand out from the

background a great deal. Not calico, but more like a drapery or furnishing

fabric.

We all expected a solid back, because we had only seen pictures of fronts,

never a

back. The owner couldn't understand why we were so excited to see the back -

he had it because of family sentiment, and had never evaluated the quilt.

He and his wife were very impressed with the documentation, and decided

they should insist that his sister bring her quilt in, so they called her and

waited for her to come. Sister's quilt was made by the same grandmother with

the same wool fabrics, but looked like Easter. It had been washed, and used,

and hung out to dry, etc., so much, that the colors had faded to what I think

of as Easter shades of green and light purple. Inside the border - which was

raggedy - you could see the original color of the fabric, which matched the

brother's quilt. She hated the darkness of the quilt - and its memories, I

think - and admitted that she had tried to wear out (destroy) the quilt so she

could in clear conscience get rid of it. But she lamented - it wears like iron

and won't wear out.

The backing on her quilt was apron gingham - what we called woven

homespuns. It was a beige and light tan small plaid, maybe 1/4 to 3/8 inch

check. A subdued color - but was that maybe from all the washing.

He did verify that grandmother's family was Old Order Amish.

These are the only two backs of traditional Amish quilts I have seen.

This fall I was visiting a shop owned by an older woman and got talking to

her about traditional quilts, and asked her about the backs. She set up

housekeeeping in the early 1940s and said they didn't use and didn't want the

dark quilts. She said her mom tried to give her some of hers, but they used

chenille bedspreads on their beds instead. Maybe that explains why it was so

easy to sell the older quilts during the 40s, 50s and 60s - the younger

generation wasn't interested. She said she didn't remember looking at the back

of a traditional quilt, and had no idea what was on the back.

If anyone else has been fortunate enough to have first had knowledge about

the construction of Amish quilts from anywhere, please post to the list. This

is the kind of information I am hoping to read about here. Thanks.

Barb in southeastern PA

(bgarrettfast.net)

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 15 Dec 1996 11:15:04 -0800

From: Chris Smith <csmithmail.coos.or.us>

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Quilting Long Ago (Amish quilts)

Message-Id: <9612151915.AA31182mail.coos.or.us>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I'm new to this list, but not to quilting, so thought I'd put in my 2 cents

worth. All this information about Amish quilts is fascinating. When I

started quilting it was to make a quilt I had seen in a magazine - Amish

Roman stripe. Of course did it the hard way by cutting all the stripes

separately, etc. Have since learned easier methods. There is an Amish

exhibition in Los Angeles that I hope, hope, hope to get to when we go down

for Christmas. I've now made about 5 Amish quilts, some with no black, and

have participated in several on-line block swaps. In fact, youngest daughter

is getting a queen-sized Amish quilt for her bed made with pinwheel and

bear-paw blocks from a swap. About the backs, I'm not Amish and haven't seen

the backs of the old ones so any information about them is appreciated. From

what Barb Garrett said in another post, I guess I wasn't too far off in

backing one with a used flowered sheet. Wanted to get it done and didn't

have money for backing nor any on hand. Used what was available. Perhaps

that's what people did.

Chris Smith (csmithmail.coos.or.us)

Coquille, Oregon

=*=**=*=*=**=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=**=

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 15 Dec 1996 11:15:02 -0800

From: Chris Smith <csmithmail.coos.or.us>

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Amish-like wool quilt

Message-Id: <9612151915.AA31307mail.coos.or.us>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

At 12:52 PM 12/15/96 -0500 Christine T. wrote:

>I worry that the dark thread will look garish where it crosses the light

>yellow-green of the mistletoe rectangles. Also, my quilting stitches are not

>perfect yet and every flaw will show up. (I could pretend I was a young Amish

>girl just learning the art.) It is hard to take the plunge.

>

I've made a number of Amish quilts and believe it or not, the black quilting

does not look garish, no matter what color it crosses. Rather than stand

out, the black actually kind of mutes everything and ties it all together,

kind of like a shadow, but where the quilting DESIGN stands out, not the

individual stitches. I haven't made one in wool, but it seems like the

shadow effect might be even more pronounced with the thicker fabric. I love

quilting with black so much that it's been hard branching our into other

types of quilts where the quilting needs to be in lighter colors. However,

am getting there. You might try stitching together some strips of your wool

fabrics and do some practice quilting to see what it looks like. Your fabric

colors sound really beautiful.

Hope this helps a little,

Chris Smith (csmithmail.coos.or.us)

Coquille, Oregon

=*=**=*=*=**=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=*=**=

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 15 Dec 1996 16:07:17 +0000

From: Bev Jordan <qultfixdirectcon.net>

To: CTislanderaol.com

CC: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Amish-like wool quilt

Message-ID: <32B42235.1B4Fdirectcon.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Christine,

>

> I worry that the dark thread will look garish where it crosses the light

> yellow-green of the mistletoe rectangles. Also, my quilting stitches are not

> perfect yet and every flaw will show up.

 

Take the plunge. I made a quilt for my daughter for her high school

graduation. I used Amish colors and black and put the blocks together in a fan shape. Finished

one evening about 10 and went downstairs to where she was watching TV and tossed

the blocks in her lap and said for her to put them in the lay-out she liked. In

no time at all, she had them in the shape of an "S" which is the initial of her

first name, Sonya. I learned a lot while making and finishing the quilt.

First, when you put fan blocks in the shape of an "S", you need to add 4"

sections on the two sides of the "S" to complete the piece. I then added a small

border of squares of all the fabrics used and then a larger black border. There were

fans in each corner. I used the Hobbs dark polyester batt, which I won't use again

because of bearding, but the bearding doesn't show as much as when I've used lighter

poly  batts so this is good. I put on the back a mottled piece of fabric that

picked up the colors from the front of the quilt. I wanted to do cables in the wide black borders and I

had them continue into the corner blocks. I found the black thread showed very nicely on all the

fabrics and really didn't have much problem quilting on black with black thread. I just

made sure I had strong light when I quilted. Because of the added 4" pieces, I

had to draft the top and side borders and did this full size using large sheets of

butcher paper, covered both sides with clear contact paper and then cut my stencil with a

double

bladed x-acto knife. It was a lot of work but worth it.

I entered the quilt in the California State Fair and won a third place

ribbon so guess the quilt turned out okay. One of the comments was the use of the black

which I had, because of not thinking, not paid any attention to grain so it looked like I

had used more than one black in the quilt. One of the judges wrote that this is what

the Amish do, use more than one black in their quilts. Does anyone know if this is

true or not?

Well, to make a long story short, go ahead and quilt your quilt in black and

don't worry about it. The quilting is really beautiful and shows beautifully on

all the rich solid colors and against the black.

Bev

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 15 Dec 1996 21:56:14 -0500

From: quiltmagmindspring.com (Jean Ann)

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: hand carding

Message-Id: <v01540b03aeda6a933e4a[168.121.76.43]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I will look up the documentation after xmas...but I can tell you absolutely

that there was hand carding of cotton for batts in the South well into the

depression years.

Jean Ann Eitel

America's Favorite Quilter

http://www.quiltmag.com

Let's Talk Quilting: dal.net IRC - /join #quilttalk

http://www.quiltmag.com/QuiltTalk/

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 15 Dec 1996 22:05:34 -0500

From: quiltmagmindspring.com (Jean Ann)

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: Re: QHL: DAR Museum

Message-Id: <v01540b06aeda6cbabfd8[168.121.76.43]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>Does anyone know if the DAR Museum has a web site?

>--

I have been to see the DAR Museum quilts and their state rooms too.

Fortunately I was also able to go into the vault where they have over 250

exciting wonderful quilts.

They do not have a web site yet but they are working on one.

Go to this program if you can!

Jean Ann Eitel

America's Favorite Quilter

http://www.quiltmag.com