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Quilters Find a way to care

96029

 

 

 

 

 

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 13:34:29 -0500

From: mrbillmagicnet.net (Bill Wohlfart)

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: GFG quilts

Message-Id: <199612291837.NAA13497magicnet.magicnet.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi everyone. Jeanann in Orlando, Fl., here. I love to buy old pieced

blocks at antique shows, etc. and finish them as I believe every quilter

would have wanted her quilt to be finished and admired.

I bought 10 GFG blocks about 5 years ago. They obviously went together as

some of the greatly mis-matched fabrics were in other blocks. they were

dirty and still even had the newspaper basted on the back of each little hex.

Finally, I went to my local quilt shop guru and asked her to teach me how to

paper piece so I could make a white on white (antique style) path to connect

all the blocks and finish the top. I washed them by hand and laid them on

my patio. After the birds anointed them, I washed them again and laid them

out covered.

I spent about three months (after cutting lots of brown paper hex patterns

and lots of cloth circles) hand basting and then whip-stitching everything

together.

I made a wall hanging with the ten plates staggered in rows. I hand-quilted

in each row of the "flowers" and hand-quilted "phantom flowers" in the

larger white spaces. It cam out great and it is amazing how good they all

look together, even the plaids and stripes and the orange and green hexes.

I'm glad I learned the old technique and it was very satisfying to complete

the top.

Jeanann in Orlando

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 13:54:43 -0500

From: QRestoreaol.com

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Opps!

Message-ID: <961229135442_2053773550emout11.mail.aol.com>

Sorry. . .Forgot to sign this response to Rabbit Goody's comments, so will

resend it.

While I certainly agree there are many quilts that are too damaged and/or

stained and should be appreciated for their charm, there are just as many

that with a small amount of restoration can reduce the advancement of further

damage. Are we to ignore past generations of quilters who routinely mended,

darned, patched and created their own soloutions to preserving textiles

(vintage clothing, linens, quilts, etc.) in order to pass them on to their

children, grandchildren, etc? There is alot to be learned from those who so

carefully repaired and maintained quilts in centuries past.

Quilts made for special occasions or display were seldom used, and are in

excellant condition today. However, the majority of quilts made were well

used and yes, repaired over and over again, many by the original quiltmaker.

Quilts were made to be functional, with scarcely a thought to having it

displayed in a museum. Quilts were washed using harsh methods and beaten and

we would consider them abused today, but we are smarter today about such

methods.

How would we want our quilts to be treated years from now? To have someone

meticously and carefully repair (not change) a quilt, so that it might be

appreciated and seen, not stored, would bring me great joy. Quilts have

always been repaired, it is part our their history that has been passed down

through generations of families. True restoration does not mean removing age

from a quilt, nor does it mean altering or changing a quilt. Perhaps there

is a lack of understanding, on the part of some, about what true restoration

is.

There is admittedly, a huge gap between those who believe conservation is the

only correct solution in preserving our quilts and those who believe

restoration can be successfully used in maintaining a quilts condition. How

can we forget what our ancestors have taught us about preserving and

maintaining quilts.

Food For Thought . . .

Victoria Montgomery

QRestoreaol.com

Boise, ID

 

 

 

 

 

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 16:23:59 -0500

From: Baglady111aol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: soap box

Message-ID: <961229162358_643041328emout09.mail.aol.com>

Rabbitt, I think I lean to agreeing with you..anytime I have seen stains or

soil, any marks, I feel it is part of the charm..it's there, accept it..I

keep thinking of those tops/quilts that my friend soaked for 2 weeks

(changing the water every 2 days or so..) I recall ME trying it..and now I

wonder..you know how youo flip out the top sheet when you are changing your

bed linens?? I wonder if somewhere, that owner of that top I quilted for my

friend's customer..was flipped and PRESTO..became cotton confetti!! I guess

it is all what you can live with..it would be most interesting to know HOW

the stains occurred..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 16:29:46 -0500

From: Baglady111aol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: RE: letting old quilts be old quilts

Message-ID: <961229162945_611797335emout10.mail.aol.com>

If you decide you want to use feedsacks..let me know..Jane in "can't make up

my mind..cold? Hot? snow? Rain..up and down.".Pgh.

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 16:33:13 -0500

From: Baglady111aol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: QHL-Digest Digest V96 #26

Message-ID: <961229163311_677394248emout06.mail.aol.com>

I'm wondering if the kit is a PARAGON..that company specialized in alot of

the floral kits..there are several members in my Feedsack Club who collect

kits..migh be able to trace it down..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 17:21:20 +0000

From: "The Garretts" <bgarrettpo.fast.net>

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Quilting in the WPA

Message-Id: <m0veTd0-0004ONCfast.net>

Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII

Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Since the writers of the WPA - Works Project Administration - of the 1930s have

been mentioned, I wanted to tell you about a quilt project of the WPA. This

will be fairly long, but I hope you will learn about something you never knew

existed.

 

I am a member of the Variable Star Quilters of Souderton, PA, and in 1988

we began researching a State wide Museum Extension Project of the Works

Projects Administration which took place in District 2 (Philadelphia area) of

PA, involving quilts. We began because I was fortunate to find at auction 25

silk screened plates of quilt patterns. They are really pretty, and we began

investigating them. We learned that there are 30 plates in the entire

collection, and they were done in South Langhorne and Croydon, PA. The project

began in 1938 or 1939, and appears to be very localized. Less than 5 complete

sets are known to be in existance. Funding ended in January 1941, so it was a

very short lived project.

As was mentioned earlier, about 1/4 of WPA employment was in service

projects such as the Federal Writers Project, Index of American Design, and

Museum Extension Project. They were all under the Fine Arts Project which

employed out-of-work writers, artists, musicians and theater people. The

purpose of the FAP was to preserve and celebrate the traditions of American

culture of the past.

Also printed in addition to the 30 silk screened patterns was a manual

entitled "Quilts Pieced and Appliqued: Colonial and Pioneer Patchwork Quilts."

The title page says - A series of thirty color plates of authentic old pieced

and appliqued quilts showing working drawings including the cutting size and

finished size patches, together with descriptive material necessary for their

making.

Our research has led us to believe that the designs were based on Ruth

Finley's book, Old Patchwork Quilts and the Women Who Made Them, and

that the numerous errors indicate that the writers and artists were not

quilters. There is a high degree of comparison between the plates in Ruth's

book and the pictures of completed quilts on the WPA plates.

In 1990, the Variable Star Quilters and the Reading Public Library -

owners of one complete set of plates - reprinted the set of 30 plates and the

manual. The new manual includes history and research about the WPA and this

specific project, as well as corrections to the original manual that would

allow more satisfactory quilt construction. Members of our group made all 30

of the quilts using the patterns given - there are 16 of us so it was a

manageable project - and made the necessary corrections.

Copies of the portfolio reprint are still available - shops find it hard

to display due to its size - and if anyone would like information about this

little known piece of quilt history, please contact me. The Variable Star

Quilters are a non profit group and donate all of our money from book sales,

show prizes and quilt shows to woman and children's charities. We meet in

members homes so pay no rent, do not have expensive speakers or a newsletter,

and no administrative budget. All proceeds do go to charity.

Hope somebody found this interesting and/or informative. Happy quilting!!

Barb in southeastern PA

<bgarrettfast.net>

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 15:07:36 -0500

From: "jackiem" <jackiemivic.net>

To: <QHLcuenet.com>, "Quilting Heritage ListServ" <QRSmail.albany.net>

Subject: QHL: Re: From a dealers perspective

Message-Id: <199612292322.PAA31235ns.ivic.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

I like this list, because I am interested in restoration and there are

some really good discussions going on here. Thanks to all of you for your

input and taking the time to share your expertise.

I look at quilts from the value to the owner. Several years ago, someone

asked me if I could repair an old quilt that belonged to a woman in her

late eighties, who had lost everything when her house burned down.

A neighbor rescued two quilts from a dumpster, after the insurance

adjusters tossed them out, that miraculously survived with burns & singes

on the folds and edges.

One was a large Hexagon quilt (1" hexes in a diamond setting with pink

between the diamonds) that was burned on the edges most of the damage ion

the corners, required matching a pink fabric that had faded to different

colors around the edges of the sides of the quilt. the hexagons were easy

to fix, I just made paper pieced new ones, and was able to save the entire

quilt. The backing was another thing. But I learned that if you have to

repair a back on the quilt, I used an appliquéd patch is this case, and

made sure that all of the appliqué edges ended at a quilt line, so that it

is not obvious.

The other quilt was a white with blue embroidered nursery rhymes squares

quilt (single size). The fabric used in the embroidered quilt was feedsack

and there was not enough fabric, the square was simply pieced to make it

the correct size. (I found this particular point made it much easier to

repair.) The batting was an old blanket and muslin on the back. This

quilt was badly burned on the folds and especially down the middle. A few

of the blocks were beyond repair,

Basically I removed one row of blocks and used the fabric from these

blocks to repair the rest of the quilt blocks. embroidered where necessary

and retied the quilt. I did not try to remove all of the scorched fabric,

only the fabric that was too fragile and or totally gone. The scorches

that were left simply add to the charm of the quilt. I Always save as

much of the original embroidery work as possible only cut of the burned

part added a piece to the block, then replaced embroidery.

Most of the quilts I work on are some that no one wants to touch as they

are too far gone. The quilts usually come to me with the question is "Can

you do ANYTHING with this?". I am always up to a challenge, so will

usually try. Usually prefer to mend than cut up into smaller quilts.

The Hexagon quilt was made by her mother and the embroidered quilt was

made by the owner when she was about 8 or ten years old. They are going

to her nieces. Sentimental value far exceeded the monetary value.

 

I wash quilts ONLY when necessary (TEST fabrics first.) especially if they

have never been washed. Some of the odors that are in an old quilt,

disappear with airing. If necessary to wash, I wash after the repairs

are made. If stain does not come out with a gentle washing, and I can't

replace the fabric, I leave it, If the quilt is valuable enough to pay

to have it repaired or restored. It will still be valuable even with the

stain.

If I am not sure of a quilts origin or value, I ASK someone before I

start. Some quilts cannot be restored and should only be worked on by an

expert in that particular type of repair and preservation. Most of us

will never come in contact with this type of quilt, but you never know.

I learned a lot from these quilts and these quilts started me on the road

to restoration. I have saved quilts from the cutting table and can't bear

to see them cut up. I will restore them to the point that they will

survive another generation or two and then will someday pass them on to

someone who feels the same way I do. When I need an old quilt piece for a

project, I will make a piece the size needed then clip, toss it around and

abuse it, rather than cut an old quilt up. I hope who ever inherits my

quilts will feel the same way and that my quilts as plain or as fancy as

they might be, will last for generations.

 

Just a little humor, One of the quilts I have worked of a couple of times

is a Double wedding ring quilt that was a wedding gift from the

mother-in-law. It has burns on it (cinders from the fireplace?) and they

wanted it repaired because MIL is coming to visit and they don't want her

to see it. I aired it in the garage for a couple of weeks, each time I had

it, before bringing it in the house to work on it as it smelled like a

cigarette.

--

Jackie Meunier

jackiemivic.net

jmeunierjuno.com

jackiemartlover.com

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 16:10:54 -0500

From: "jackiem" <jackiemivic.net>

To: <QHLcue.com>, "Merry May" <gridgeesalgorithms.com>

Subject: QHL: Re:QHL Debbie's "What is This?

Message-Id: <199612292322.PAA31241ns.ivic.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

About 2 years ago, a local quilter passed away and her husband donated her

stash to the local quilt quild not to be sold.

Members were given access to these things and were asked to donate to

hospice in her name in exchange for anything taken. There were boxes and

boxes of scraps, patterns, books and odds and ends UFO's and yardage, a

whole garage full.

In one of the boxes I found a piece as you describe that was partially

appliquéd, including a number as is on your and the word top.

Mine is a large basket with a small floral in each corner. Rummaging

through some of the other boxes, I found a couple of strips that had

similar motives that were squares, One square was appliquéd and another

was not and then there were two squares that were not done and were not

cut apart. In another box, I found two yellow strips that had 2 strips on

them. then in another box, I found all of the appliqué pieces marked and

at this time I noticed that all of these appliqué designs had flowers with

square centers.

I took all of this home and laid it out and had a full size quilt with a

large white background center piece with a large basket of flowers in

the center and flowers in each corner, with a wide yellow border on each

side of the quilt and a white square with a floral design in each corner.

What a find! All of the pieces of fabric to finish the appliqué were in

tact as whoever started the quilt only cut out the pieces as she needed

them. There were 3 missing leaves and a stems missing from one corner of

the center block which I was able to get from the scraps.

How easy it would have been to not notice all of the centers being the

same or not looked trough the box of scraps that nobody was interested in.

(I was looking for scraps to save for restoration purposes and I knew

that her collection included her mother's stash.) As the center was

nearly finished, I might have just added border or borders and used it for

a wall hanging.

I finished this Quilt Kit and hung it at our quilt show 2 years ago.

Later on while leafing through some of my old quilting magazines, I can

never throw one away. I spotted this same quilt, hanging in a booth, in

an advertisement which included an overhead view of the Houston Quilt

show.

I am sure that this would have been from the same company as the markings

you described are similar. I have not been able to find out who made the

kits yet, but am still working on it.

I have another kit that was given to me to finish which is a paragon kit.

The picture of the quilt which probably was on the front of the package

was in the box when I got it. It was passed around by different people

and when anyone saw it they decided they did not want it , so put it away

until they found someone else to give it to. When I received it, the Lady

said I want to give this to someone who will finish it.

The pieces were all cut out and not one missing, but not sorted. The

quilt is made in three strips approximately the size you described. all

of the strips have the border on top and bottom and 2 of the strips also

have the border down the side and are wider than the center strip. There

are four large paisley patterns in each strips The border has two rows of

scallops and the quilting patterns that are stamped on it are beautiful

quilted paisleys.

 

I would never have bought a quilt like this in the first place, but as I

was given this, I looked at it as a challenge and then fell in love with

it as I worked on it. I am now doing the quilting and hope to have it done

for our quilt show the end of January.

--

Jackie Meunier

jackiemivic.net

jmeunierjuno.com

jackiemartlover.com

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 20:21:30 -0500

From: quiltmagmindspring.com (Jean Ann)

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: irc channels

Message-Id: <v01540b05aeecc8df1cb3[168.121.76.43]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

In addition to quiltchat on the internet there are several other chat

channels. I am founder of quilttalk, also on dal.net.

However, i dont think this list is the place to promote the irc chat

channels, and i have not done so as a deliberate decision. Therefore i

found the invite to the quiltchat New Year's eve party out of place in this

mail group.

i thought this was quilt heritage. what i have liked about this list is, so

far, we have stuck to the topic of the list. Quilt History and Heritage.

Can't we keep it that way. There are many other ways to promote private

endeavors other than through email to the Quilt Heritage group.

Getting off my soap box and holding up a net to catch the rotten tomatos :-)

 

Jean Ann Eitel

America's Favorite Quilter

http://www.quiltmag.com

Let's Talk Quilting: dal.net IRC - /join #quilttalk

http://www.quiltmag.com/QuiltTalk/

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 19:56:40 -0600

From: Rose Marie Mize <rmizeice.net>

To: QHLcuenet.com

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 21:12:51 -0500

From: Ricki Maietta <rmaiettacsrlink.net>

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: red & green

Message-Id: <199612300208.SAA08775orbital.cue.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Sadie Rose asked about the Rose of Sharon pattern being a bride's quilt.

Over the years it became obvious to me that an awfully lot of the red &

green on white applique quilts from mid-1800s to early 1900 were made by

brides, or for brides. Maybe this was already known by others, but it was

sort of a "revelation" for me. I tested my theory recently when someone

donated a gorgeous Coxcombe applique to our local museum (they were calling

it a cactus pattern - but I can document coxcombe over & over) - I asked if

they knew the history of the quilt. Yep - made in 1875 by a mother & sister

for the other sister's upcoming wedding! I'm wondering if, like today,

applique wasn't just considered a step above piecing, & it has nothing to do

with red & green. What about all those gorgeous blue & white applique

quilts - some were in Albany this October at the conference (some were both

pieced & appliqued). Anyone know if the blue & whites, or other appliques,

were made specifically for brides???? Curious in PA -

Ricki

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 20:34:00 CDT

From: josiemtekstar.com

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Library of Congress Site & Jean Ann's letter

Message-Id: <199612300233.UAA10852perham>

The site you are looking for is : http://lcweb2.loc.gov/ and thanks to

whomever the original poster was. I get happy with the delete key sometimes

and don't keep info that I might like to.

I didn't get in on the chat line business but I really would like to say this

is by far the most interesting of the quilting listservs and would like to

see it stay as it is. This list being focused on the historical aspects of

quilting provides a most intrigueing spot in the day and has caused me to do

research into the WPA , a few old fabrics I have, and two old quilts as

well. If I understood Jean Ann's letter, she too hoped we stayed focused

on our quilting heritage. She won't get any tomatoes from me!

Jo in Minnesota

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 21:42:09 -0500

From: Baglady111aol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: red & green

Message-ID: <961229214209_876491333emout04.mail.aol.com>

Pieced quilts were much faster to make and in given areas were usually the

'utility' quilts.Time was of the essence and sometimes you will find a quilt

'in' a quilt..jsut get a top done, sew it to the other quilt or put the quilt

to be replaced inside the newer one..but the applique was quite often a young

lady's "best" quilt..a quilt where time and planning was involved..utility

quilts were often scrap quilts..an applique on the other hand might well be

fabrics bought just for this quilt..and the quilt would also be a way to show

your familyand friends the intricate stitching you could do..after all, it

was not polite to brag about your talents..heaven forbid if you would be

asked to participate in a 'show & tell'..but it would certainly be admired if

it was on your bed or as was oftenthe case. a special guest/vistitor would be

afforded the opportunity to sleep under her 'best'qujilt. The reds/greens

seemed to be very popular at one time..jsut as we have our 'craze' periods

today..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 21:43:45 -0500

From: Baglady111aol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: red & green

Message-ID: <961229214343_1621144906emout04.mail.aol.com>

well, how rude..I got carried away and forgot to answer one of ur

questions..in my area of Va. it was customary to go to your wedding with 12

quilts..11 everyday (utility) quitls and the 12th being our 'best' quilt and

in most cases..applique..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 21:42:33 +0000

From: "The Garretts" <bgarrettpo.fast.net>

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: DAR

Message-Id: <m0veXhl-0004EECfast.net>

Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII

Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Jean wrote -

All I can think of when I hear /read the title DAR is...... Were there any slave

quilts in the exhibition? Jean Laino jquiltaol.com

I was privileged to visit the DAR for their quilt workshop in December, and

yes, the docent did talk about the exquisite southern quilts being made by both

the mistress and the very talented slaves. Please keep in mind that the quilts

shown in these workshops are the "best" quilts that have survived from

different time periods - intricate piecing, applique and quilting. If you are

referring in your question to utilitarian type quilts made by slaves, I would

have to say there were none. But there weren't any utilitarian quilts made by

anyone, since this was not the focus of the workshop. Because the body of work

called Antique Quilts is so broad, a museum must of necessity decide where its

niche will be, and when viewing quilts for only 1 1/2 hours, one cannot expect

to see "all" types of quilts made in the US. I still recommend this workshop

to anyone interested in antique quilts and able to get to Washington, DC.

Barb in southeastern PA

<bgarrettfast.net>

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 01:00:17 -0500

From: Laurajbraol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: red & green

Message-ID: <961230010016_438875042emout14.mail.aol.com>

Hi,

I collect red and green floral appliqued quilts from the 1800's and have

histories on many of them, and some indeed were made as wedding quilts. But

one of my very favorite quilts, signed and dated March 15, 1850, and

presented to the maker's niece on her wedding, is predominantly orange. It

has red and green in it too. It has a heavily quilted white background with

orange Baltimore-style Fleur-de-Lis type blocks (see Elly's books) with red

centers and orange oak leaves coming out of them. The four center blocks are

more intricate and include green stems and leaves and red flower buds and in

the center of two of these blocks are the presentation inscriptions. It is a

fabulous quilt. Every time my dear friend from Black Mountain, NC, comes to

visit--she is an antique quilt dealer--she tells me to name my price and she

will buy it. But I can't part with it. I found is about 5 years ago in an

antique shop in Dade City, which is just north of Tampa.

Another interesting story about this quilt: When we were visiting my

above-mentioned friend in NC one summer, she took me to meet a friend of hers

who also collected antique quilts. As we went through her huge, varied

collection, we came across another red, green and orange appliqued quilt

signed by the same lady who made mine!!! Her name is Elizabeth Coyle and on

my quilt, she crossed out her middle name. I can't remember if she did that

on Kay's quilt or not.

Laura in Tampa

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 22:00:40 PST

From: psierajuno.com (Pam D Siera)

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Re: Books and labels

Message-ID: <19961229.220331.3710.5.PSierajuno.com>

Just wanted to share that I found a new copy of "Shared Threads" at

the bookstore this weekend for $7.99 20% off. And I bought it because

you'all talk about it and i'm sure I'll enjoy it. One story already

brought tears to my eyesl.

I had an epiphany about the quilt labels that I'm going to do for my

family quilts. A friend has a scanner and I'd been planning on using the

family photos, old ones, that I've got on disk for a pictorial quilt.

Well, the enlightenment was to put photos of the women who made and

influenced the quilts on the labels. I'm still working in b/w and that is

appropriate for these older quilts. Any thoughts about how those heat

bonded transfers onto muslin might not be good for the quilts? Pigma

pens sound just as chancy to me but they don't have glue on them.

Letters in envelopes would be great but I really like the idea of labels.

TIA Pam in Santa Rosa

------------------------------

Date: Sun, 29 Dec 1996 21:21:16 -0900

From: Opalka <mopalkaalaska.net>

To: QHL-Digestcue.com

Subject: Feed Sack

Message-Id: <3.0.32.19961229212115.00693680alaska.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I have enjoyed "listening in" to the conversations. My name is Susan, I've

lived in Alaska since 1975 and I'm originally from Tulsa. I have several

quilts, tops and blocks from my Mother's side of the family. How can I tell

which ones are made from feed sacks? I know this probably sounds like a

dumb question but, I really don't know. I do have one top that my maternal

Grandmother told me was made from feed sacks. Thank you for any input. I

enjoy hearing about the history of quilting and all aspects of quilting. I

was lucky enough to receive "Stitched from the Soul" and "Mennonite

Quilts" for Christmas. Happy Holidays from Alaska where it is 0 degrees

and no new snow this week.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 01:26:39 -0500

From: RLHlink3aol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: RE: letting old quilts be old quilts

Message-ID: <961230012638_812383602emout08.mail.aol.com>

My face is red: I just realized that I did not sign my earlier response ("let

old quilts be old quilts") to Rabbit's comments. I am enjoying very much, and

learning a lot from, these discussions. Thanks to you all.

Linda in Redding CA

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 01:42:02 -0500

From: RLHlink3aol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: Books and labels

Message-ID: <961230014200_405324312emout13.mail.aol.com>

What a neat idea to put the maker's photo on the quilt label! I'll be

listening to hear any comments re: adverse effects from the photo process.

Linda/Redding CA

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 07:57:04 -0500

From: AJSNGSaol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Old quilts

Message-ID: <961230075704_1524289086emout16.mail.aol.com>

Hi,

As some of you already know, I am very new to the world of quilting, and

relatively new to collecting old ones. I have several very "ratty" looking

quilts--in other words they are not perfect and lots of people would not like

them. For instance, I recently bought a lovely 1900 Irish chain. It is

mostly blue and white with a little bit of red in it. I love the colors in

this quilt despite the fact that a good bit of the fabric is plain ol

deteriorating, and the part of the quilt that I don't have showing has a big

ole hole in it! But when you walk into the room, there it sits lovely and

bright despite it's imperfections, and obvious age. I hope that I will look

like this when I am in my 90s too! Part of what draws me to older quilts is

the sense of history behind them. I have heard several of you say (and I

agree) "if only they could talk!". All of these quilts were new once but it

is "the life they've led" that has brought them to where they are now. Some

have led a cushy life, and some have led a life of hard work which is exactly

what they were intended to do. I don't think that we necessarily need to

restore all quilts, but sometimes repairs will help keep them around a little

bit longer for us to enjoy.

Just my 2 cents worth from a newbie. Thanks for listening.

Nancy in balmy Virginia

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 08:01:22 -0500

From: quiltmagmindspring.com (Jean Ann)

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: WPA Thread

Message-Id: <v01540b0baeed6d5bc1d4[168.121.76.43]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I missed the original URL posting for this WPA thread. Would someone please

post it again?

Rose Marie

I mussed the orignal too...i am very interested. wwe spend a week every

summer in an old CCC camp in NC...it has been modernized, but there is so

much up in tha appalachians to do with the wpa and ccc, but not much

accessible history that i can find.

Jean Ann Eitel

America's Favorite Quilter

http://www.quiltmag.com

Let's Talk Quilting: dal.net IRC - /join #quilttalk

http://www.quiltmag.com/QuiltTalk/

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 08:44:19 -0500

From: AJSNGSaol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: WPA Thread

Message-ID: <961230084419_1591393533emout01.mail.aol.com>

Jean Ann,

Where is the old CCC camp? How do you find out about places like that? I

live in Virginia and the CCC built the Skyline Drive in the mountains here.

I'm very interested in all of this too.

Please e-mail me if you can help me out with information. Thanks,

Nancy in Va.

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 08:52:53 -0500

From: Baglady111aol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: red & green

Message-ID: <961230085251_2020323907emout20.mail.aol.com>

Laura, that is amazing..where did you find YOUR quilt made by the same lady?

It's amazing where fabrics and quilts have traveled..and I was surprised

about the mix of red and orange..to heighten how what was poular at the

time..wasn't there a period where purple was the rage? Mid or late 1800"s??

And the Crazy quilt was oh so popular for awhile as well..I can't recall who

posted about crazy quilts but I know of a lady in the DC area who is an

expert on them and teaches that style..Jane of THE FEEDSACK CLUB

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 08:57:18 -0500

From: AJSNGSaol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Sorry again!

Message-ID: <961230085717_1755736337emout10.mail.aol.com>

Well I didn't mean to post my last note to Jean Ann to the whole list,

although there might be others who are interested. Sorry!

Also, I have misplaced my address for the the WPA online information. Would

you please post it again for those of us who can't remember it?

Thanks very much,

Nancy in Virginia

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 08:59:44 -0500

From: Baglady111aol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Feed Sack

Message-ID: <961230085943_1457848527emout16.mail.aol.com>

SUSAN, feedsacks have a particular look and texture. If you send me your

snail mail address I will be happy to send you some samples of feedsacks for

you to distinguish the materials. The most common feedsacks will have a

slightly coarser feel..altho there are sacks that are as nice as any percale

you would put on your bed today..these held flour, sugar, salt, any product

that could 'sift' thru..so the thread count was high givng it a tighter

weave. If they were storing nuts/ apples/ beans/ anything larger..they weave

could be looser. What size squares would you like? Then you'lll have them

to play with..Jane of THE FEEDSACK CLUB

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 09:22:44 -0500

From: "James M. Welch" <hawkcsionline.com>

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Paragon kits?????

Message-ID: <32C7D034.6067csionline.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Jackie, Merry and Jane,

Thanks for your insights. I have another question. What are paragon

kits?

 

I took the appliqued piece to my weekly quilt group, the QE 2 girls

(Quilt and Eat Too!) and they had some ideas on how to finish it into

something usuable. Its really too big for a table topper, and with

three teenagers and one table, there is no way I would put it on there

anyway!, but it is not big enough as is for any size quilt, too long and

skinny. One suggestion was to add patchwork to it on either side in red

and greens, another was to make two other panels the same as the one I

have but I would really like to find out what the whole thing was

supposed to look like before I do anything. What are the chances of

finding out? Pretty good? A million to one?

Debbie in NJ

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 10:24:12 -0500

From: Laurajbraol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: red & green

Message-ID: <961230102411_1722185567emout02.mail.aol.com>

Jane and anyone else interested<

I found my orange, red and green wedding quilt in an antique shop in Dade

City, Florida--a wonderful little town full of antique stores, a quilt shop

and the world's greatest restaurant, about a 45-minute drive from Tampa. You

feel like you've stepped back into the 1950's when you spend a day up there.

The shopkeepers and townspeople all know each other and after a few visits,

they know us visitors too. The shop I found my quilt is no longer in business

but it was called Lady Anne's and it was mainly Victorian antiques, beautiful

furniture, flower arrangements, and there, hanging on the back wall, was MY

quilt. It was love at first sight and for me, one of my greatest finds (which

was confirmed by my friend, the antique quilt dealer.)

The other quilt made by the same lady is in Black Mountain, North Carolina.

That is also a wonderul little town and well worth a visit if you are passing

through the NC mountains. It's just east of Asheville. I find some wonderful

antique quilts there and all over the mountains. Kay does not remember when

she found her quilt or where. If you could see her collection, you'd

understand why. she must have 300 quilts, including a Baltimore album, one

from the late 1700's, and many, many more.

I would love to know how our two quilts came into being and how they became

separated, but at least I do know when mine was made and who it was for. I

guess I won't find out why Elizabeth Coyle crossd out her middle name. It

must have had some powerful memories associated with it for her to do that on

this masterpiece.

As for colors in these quilts, red and green appliques were very popular in

the mid 1800's and they often used yellow or orange as an accent color. In

this quilt, though, the orange is the predominant color and the reds and

greens are the accent colors. I do have one other orange quilt. It is an

appliqued one, of course, and it's baskets with flowers. The quilting is

spectacular, as it often was during that time, and even though it is not my

usual red and green, I couldn't resist it. (either...)

Laura in Tampa

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 09:05:00 PST

From: jadavisjuno.com (Julie A Davis)

To: quiltopiastgenesis.org, kaffee-klatschquilter.com

Cc: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Re: Hello.......

Message-ID: <19961230.093223.17822.0.jadavisjuno.com>

Hello out there......

We went to my home town to see my Mom and Dad and Mother-in-law etc....

from Christmas Eve. to yesterday afternoon...... when I finally had a

minute last

night to check my mail I had 798 messages! It took me about 2 1/2 hours

to go

through them and I deleted many! wew! It was really kinda funny to read

the

messages from the 24th and compare them to the 26th etc...... everyone on

all of

the lists that I'm on were so frantic and rushed and then were so calm

and already

planning Christmas '97! Ha!!! :-)

I did get one sewing/quilting related gift from a friend -- a book called

"501 Quilt

Blocks" by Better Homes & Gardens -- It's a beautiful hard back book and

the

pictures etc. are beautiful.... can't wait to have the time to really dig

into it!

Well............... I hope you all had a Merry Christmas and have a Happy

New Year!

Julie Davis

jadavisjuno.com

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 10:54:45 -0500

From: Baglady111aol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: WPA Thread

Message-ID: <961230105439_1524305960emout18.mail.aol.com>

Nancy, I THINK she said the camp was in NC..or did I read it wrong??J

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 96 11:10:56 PST

From: John & Cinda Cawley <cawleyepix.net>

To: Ricki Maietta <rmaiettacsrlink.net>, QHLcuenet.com

Subject: RE: QHL: red & green

Message-ID: <Chameleon.961230112643.cawley.epix.net>

Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; CHARSET=us-ascii

I'm interested in the quilt Ricki mentioned that was donated to the museum.

I have seen quilts in a pattern I would have called coxcomb referred to by

the owner as cactus. Brackman cites cactus as a name for this pattern

(Encyclopedia of Applique, p. 80). Lasansky shows one (Pieced by Mother, p.

53), as does the Berks Co. Quilt Harvest (Historical Review of Berks County,

Winter 92-93, p. 16). I am increasingly reluctant to give names to 19th

century patterns unless we know what the maker called that particular quilt.

We seem compelled to retroactively impose our terminology (which is

necessary for contemporary "quilt people" to understand each other) on a

period of creative chaos.

Cinda in Scranton

-------------------------------------

Name: John & Cinda Cawley

E-mail: cawleyepix.net

Date: 12/30/96

Time: 11:10:56 AM

This message was sent by Chameleon

-------------------------------------

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 12:15:25 -0500

From: RBCochranaol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Two Don't Miss Experiences

Message-ID: <961230121525_1290204601emout08.mail.aol.com>

First of all, I want to say how delighted I am to find this site. I can

already see more computer hours spent online, esp. the WPA project info.

Thanks to everyone for sharing.

Secondly, I'd like to recommend two quilting-related experiences not to be

missed. If you possibly can, you should see the quilts from the Patricia

Smith collection being exhibited at the Renwick in D.C. They are stunning.

Plus there's fabric yardage exhibited in cases. I think the show runs

through mid-January, so you'll have to hurry. If you can't make it, though,

I understand a book is coming out in March or April 1997. I hope so, because

we couldn't take photos. (Didn't think to ask for permission ahead of time.)

The other thing you should do is to take the workshop at the DAR. I, too,

was there in December. To sign up, just call them. I think they run one on

the first Thursday of every month. But plan ahead because they limit the

group to 20 at the most. Cost is $15. You never know which ones they'll be

showing, but all we saw were interesting. You can photo here, only if you

ask for permission ahead, and I would imagine only non-flash.

Looking forward to more info exchange and wishing all a happy new year.

 

Rachel in NJ

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 09:28:58 -0800

From: Michele Weise <michelepeppertreestudios.com>

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: making heat-transfer labels

Message-Id: <3.0.32.19961230092739.0069d5d0mail.west.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi all, I can't find who asked about making labels so I'll address the

group... In regards to heat transfer labels...speaking as a framer, the

basic rule of thumb in conservation framing is: Do not change the original

artwork in any way by adding heat activated substances such as glues, tapes

etc. The idea being that you should be able to easily move the original

artwork from one frame or storage place to another without the artwork

being changed in any way, staying as close to its original condition as

possible.

That is why framers have no hesitation using heat-transfer sheets to

adhere posters to foam core, whereas they would never heat transfer a

limited edition fine art print or any original--on paper, fabric, or any

other material. Adhesion would immediately render the value of an art

print to zero. In our trade, we have something called a T mount which lets

you hold a piece in place without letting any adhesive or acid bearing

material touch the piece. Heat transer paper, (which I use all the time

for many things because I love it) has many uses but not in conservation

matting and mounting. Thin sheets of tissue/type paper are dotted with

very tiny spots of heat-activated adhesives. The adhesives range from lo

tack to hi tack. Basically, you have seen something like these in fabric

stores and it's called "Heat & Bond" tissue. Most manufactureres give

directions saying that their adhesives can be removed by reheating the

artwork and softening the adhesive and peeling it away from the sheet.

This is very seldom successful and all manufacturers with also give

disclaimers because unless the whole sheet is heated to exactly the same

temperature, and peeled off quickly, some dots of adhesive will

cool--hence, you will be caught stressing the artwork by pulling and

stretching it, and heaven forbit, tearing it.

However, after having said all this about heat transfer processes, I

would personally feel very at ease using a heat transfer label on an

antique quilt IF the label was treated as a separate piece, layered to the

quilt with a small separator of either plain cotton or acid free tissue and

hand stitched to the quilt. These adhesives that are being held between

your photo emulsion and the backing muslin, I believe would not harm the

quilt in any way because they would not be touching the quilt, and would be

in a healthy aired environment--not locked up in plastic or other

detramental atmosphere.

Good luck and I think your idea is really wonderful. Michele

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 18:38:10 -0500 (EST)

From: "Carol L. O'Neill" <coneillCapAccess.org>

To: RBCochranaol.com

cc: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Renwick Exhibit +++++

Message-ID: <Pine.SUN.3.91-FP.961230182544.18356B-100000cap1.capaccess.org>

Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

Saw the Renwick exhibit yesterday and certainly agree with Rachel that it

was stunning! Loved all the quilts, and was intrigued by Baptist Fan

quilting on one of them, dated 1830s. Have never thought about the

origin of actual quilting patterns...somehow assumed crosshatching and

squares and diamonds were used in older times. Know of any book with

info on this?

My favorite in the show was a sunflower quilt in bright yellow and

blues. Center of the flowers was a square with elongated corners, set

sometimes one way and sometimes the other, giving the flowers a carefree

feeling. It was random, but I bet the quilter did it intentionally. She

also had an interesting border treatment, using a fabric with a wide

stripe. She didn't try to miter the corners to match, but stopped them

6" or so short of the edge and added a piece of the same fabric cut on

the bias. Definitely an idea to put in my memory bank!

Really enjoy reading on here about the various views from those of you

who are restorers and other experts. I'm especially interested in

salvaging utilitarian quilts. "Time-Span Quilts" (can't remember the

author) is one of my most favorite of all quilt books. Bought a terribly

cut-up strip-pieced quilt from the 30's, took it apart in chunks, sewed

it back together and made it the central medallion of a quilt that is now

a joy to me. Have a feeling the original maker would be pleased (and

maybe relieved!).

Happy new year to you-all, and wishes for lots of wonderful finds!

--Carol in VA

(coneillcapaccess.org)

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 96 20:51:55 EST

From: "Bob Mills" <decisiontigger.jvnc.net>

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Re: QHL-Digest Digest V96 #27

Message-Id: <decision.1202384755Atigger.jvnc.net>

Intro, washing qlts, tomatoes

Hi All,

I've been reading for a few weeks and would like to introduce myself. I am

Jan Drechsler (not Bob), and have been a quiltmaker for 27 years and have

coordinated community participation quilts, as well as made dozens of

squares for community quilts. I have been a seamstress for longer than

that, and several years ago made 67 cotton dance dresses to sell so I have

tons of scraps of cotton. I am a musician (pianist) for traditional New

England Contra dances which are danced to jigs and reels, and I also call or

teach those dances.

I bought a Bernina 1090 last year and I only wonder why I fought my cheap

1960's Singer for so long. Until I sat down at my Bernina, I realized that

3/4 of my sewing energy had been directed at my old machine. The Bernina

just did what I asked it too. No more swearing at the machine. I am not

affiliated with Bernina, just a happy owner.

My other interest is old sewing machines. While I was happy when my '60's

Singer died, I was recently given my grandmother's treasured 1913 Singer

model 15 treadle, which my dad electrified in the 40's. I also found a

Singer 99 at a flea market, bought a great Singer 201 and found two

featherweights at bargain prices. I am just organizing New Jersey's first

get-together of featherweight fanatics and old sewing machine collectors.

Contact me if you are interested. There is a subscribed group of machine

collectors and sewers and repairers, to join write Suettsw.com. That's it

for my unlurking info.

I have been reading rec.textiles.quilting and sewing and the Bernina

newsgroup for 1 1/2 years and am quite tired of chit-chat about Christmas

sewing and kitty quilts and 'What are you making now?' chat. I don't learn

much from the groups except occasionally a tip about Berninas. No Tomato

Tossing from me Jean!! Hooray for you for saying 'Let's keep this group

focused.'

I have been thinking about the discussions surrounding washing and 'fixing

up' old quilts. I don't think that there is only one right answer. If we

are talking about a museum quality quilt-then I wouldn't dream of washing it

in my bathtub or anywhere else. And pulling off and replacing worn fabric

is also a sin.

But let's talk about the kind of quilt that many of us are likely to own.

In fact, let's talk about my grandmother's basket pieced quilt, in which

many of the triangle points were sewn into the seams, in which the quilting

stitches were small on the front and huge on the back, in which the front

border was wrapped around to the back instead of a binding, and in which not

one corner was square.

I just finished a fix- up project on this quilt that my grandmother made for

my mom and dad in the 50's. It was ruined at a cleaner's- faded the fabrics

and made huge lumps of the cotton batting inside, so one could see thru the

quilt in places and feel the lumps in others. My mom then gave it to me

when we were first married and then there was the leaky waterbed incident.

Yucky waterstains.

I then put it in the attic for 22 years, which didn't help preserve it. It

took me all those years to decide to destroy part of grandma's work in order

to enjoy the rest of her work. This fall, I picked out the yards and yards

of hand quilting, pulled off about 300 french knots, and took out all the

batting. I defied all quilting common sense and scrubbed it with Shout and

threw it in the washer with Tide and it came out clean and pretty. The

colors weren't any more faded after that rough treatment and it has a

charming old soft pastel look. I did the same to the water stained muslin

backing in order to re-use it. I put new Warm and Natural batting in it,

machine quilted the squares and took it to N. Carolina at Christmas to

offer it to my mom. I bet my husband that she would say, 'Oh, that old

thing-I don't want it.' Instead she said 'I always wondered what had

happened to that quilt. I would love to have it back!' Fortunately, I

never bet money. It is on mom's bed now and looks beautiful. After the

winter, I will handquilt some of it and re do the French knots. This quilt

was made to be used.

Last October, I found a large wool one patch, of 4 inch squares for $12. I

barely even looked at it before grabbing it, believing that any quilt is

worth more than $12. When I got home and looked at it closer, I thought

that maybe I had paid $11.99 too much for it! Many of the squares are moth

eaten, some of the squares are shredded tapistry, none of the squares meet

or match seams, it looks like a 6 year old's stitching and the backing had

stains suggesting multiple childbirths. Oh, it also smelled and the cotton

batting was in lumps. I decided to pick out the ties and remove the

batting. I removed the backing and tried to wash out the stains, to no

avail. Although the backing was seriously faded in places, it had once been

a lovely rose large flowered print. I washed the top (gasp) in woolite in

my machine on delicate and lay it flat to dry.

One of my future projects will be to replace some of the wool squares and

reback it with an old looking sampler flannel- which cost twice as much as

the whole quilt. It will not be perfect, nor do I want to replace all the

damaged squares. But it will go on a bed and be warm and functional and

charming.

So I think that the quilt itself has to be considered before one says never

wash it or clean it up. Each quilt has it's own answer and value, whether

it be monitary, historical or sentimental. And the care will depend on that

value.

Oh... this is long, sorry to be so long-winded the first time I write. I

promise I will listen more and write less. And I am very glad to read these

discussions.

Jan in NJ

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 21:43:51 -0500

From: Knutemaol.com

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Antique quilts in DC?

Message-ID: <961230214350_438999578emout04.mail.aol.com>

I will be in Washington, DC for a weekend in February and was wondering where

to go to see some of the antique quilts? Also, which area of the Smithsonian

has them?

Thanks,

Bet in Florida

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 23:10:02 -0500

From: RLHlink3aol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: QHL-Digest Digest V96 #27

Message-ID: <961230231002_1457958142emout05.mail.aol.com>

Dear Jan in NJ

Thank you for your long msg. I enjoyed every bit of it and I'm sure others

have too. It is very stormy here in my newly adopted N. CA home --a great

night to be curled up with the QHL, chatting with new friends about these

"old dears" (quilts).

Linda

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 17:52:24 +1100 (EST)

From: Li Joo Ng <lngbf.rmit.edu.au>

To: Posting <QHLcuenet.com>

Subject: QHL: cleaning antique quilts

Message-ID: <Pine.OSF.3.95.961231174535.30570A-100000otto.bf.rmit.edu.au>

Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

All this discussions about cleaning and washing antique quilts has kept me

glued to my computer for the past few days. I am very interested in seeing

what everyone has to say, and I feel that in their own way, everyone has a

point and no one is wrong. Since we have so many experts here, I would

like to ask when, if ever, is it all right to dry clean an antique quilt?

Most quilts are made of cotton, so how would they react to dry cleaning?

And what about crazy quilts that have silks and velvets in them?

Thanks, everyone, for sharing your tips and opinions. Have a Happy and

Healthy New Year!

LiJoo - in sunny Australia

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 16:27:41 +0800

From: Bev McGrath <bevmcgraiinet.net.au>

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Antique Quilts in Western Australia

Message-Id: <199612310827.QAA28988grunge.iinet.net.au>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi to all, This is my second letter to the forum, I enjoy it very much and

love hearing all the hints about caring for antique quilts.

I am Bev McGrath, writing to you all from Perth in Western Australia, where

tomorrow (Tuesday) the temperature is going to be 35C (about 92F) and

Wednesday and Thursday 40C (about 104F). I include this as I have just seen

on the TV reports about the terrible storms that are occuring in the North

West of the US.

We don't have a large number of antique quilts here is Australia owing to

the weather (which is suitable for light quilts only) and a history of

poverty and deprivation the early settlers and convicts faced. Australia

was first settled in 1788 as a penal colony, so the majority of the very

small population (male & female) were convicts. Even so, all (free

settlers, soldiers, prison staff and convicts) faced the same problems of

starvation and poverty.

Tasmania has the worst record for brutality and cruelty as a penal colony,

but even there the convicts had a better diet than the settlers. They grew

the food and were able to pick and eat it before the other people were even

aware it was ripe.

Quilting in Australia is a modern art, able to be taken up when the standard

of living rose post WW11 to the state where people had the time and money to

indulge in these past-times.

My mother was a great knitter but quilting is something I had not heard of

until the last 10 or so years. Even feed sacks (as produced in America) are

unknown here, only calico bags with stamped labels. Mum grew up on a farm

and was too busy working to do anything else. She left home the moment she

could and came to the city to work as a servant until she got married. This

was in the 1930's Grandma didn't sew either, as she was too busy being a

farmers wife and mother of four.

It is VERY interesting learning about the culture of a foreigh country

(USA). I find it intreging how many antique quilts are available. Surely

the farmers wives etc worked just as hard as ours? The only thing I can

think of is that America was settled about 100 years before Australia (West

Australia was the last state in 1829) and therefore there were more

generations of people to raise the standard of living.

WA started out as a free state (no convicts) but had to accept them in 1840

as the colony was in deep depression. The population were starving and many

were fleeing to other states in desparation. Convicts were needed for

labour, both by the Government (the first Public Servants) and the farmers.

People were too busy trying to stay alive to have time or the implements to

make quilts.

Conditions improved by 1860 and transportation stopped. Now we have a

legacy of many fine buildings built with convict labout, but FEW QUILTS.

I will add any other interesting things as I come across them.

Best wishes all our friends and fellow quilters.

Bev McGrath in sunny Perth, Western Australia

 

Bev McGrath in sunny Perth, Western Australia

bevmcgraiinet.net.au

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 07:45:41 -0500

From: quiltmagmindspring.com (Jean Ann)

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Unidentified subject!

Message-Id: <v01540b11aeeeb1718592[168.121.76.43]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Textiles are not like turkeys they do not have a pop up timer to tell you when

they simply will disintegrate.

This is the best statement made so far on the QHL list. I laughed and

laughed, but it is too true. Everytime someone says, i just popped that old

quilt in the washing machine, or i took it to the cleaners....i groan!

at one conservation day i attended the expert advice was to go to Home

Depot, purchase some very fine fiberglas screening. Lay the quilt on the

floor. GENTLY place the screen over it and then lightly vacuum it with your

Dustbuster, NOT your garage power vac.

Dust motes and dirt are enemies of your textiles, and this will remove a

lot of them.

Waiting to hear Rabbit's comments on this! is it okay or not? I have never

tried it, but it made sense. My worry would be to make sure the screening

was laid down in such a way, very carefully, so it did not cause abrasion

on the surface of the quilt.

Jean Ann Eitel

America's Favorite Quilter

http://www.quiltmag.com

Let's Talk Quilting: dal.net IRC - /join #quilttalk

http://www.quiltmag.com/QuiltTalk/

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 07:45:38 -0500

From: quiltmagmindspring.com (Jean Ann)

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: DAR...has changed

Message-Id: <v01540b10aeeeaea1dc44[168.121.76.43]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Yes that did happen, and it was a very shameful moment in the DAR when they

refused to let Marian Anderson. It was in the 1930's and unfortunately that

kind of terrible discrimination was common then, all over the USA. Black

Americans couldnt go to *white* colleges then either (and neither could

women, DAR or not!)....elitist schools like Harvard and Yale now accept

both blacks and women students into their hallowed halls. So while this

type of discrimination is very wrong and I admire Eleanor Roosevelt highly

for what she did.....there are a LOT of organizations that have had to open

their hallowed halls, not just the DAR.

Yes, The DAR has changed its policy. And yes they do allow African

Americans who are descended from Revolutionaly War veterans into their

organization. How do I know this? I am a descendant, and one branch of our

very large, very early to America family (Hawley is surname) seems to have

married a black woman (before the revolutionary war), had children, and so

our family tree has many black members, some of whom also fought for the

Federals in that "recent unpleasantness" (what we call the War Between The

States here in Georgia). Now I say *seems* to have married a black woman

because the church records are incomplete, but we do know a Hawley male

child was baptised for the records that do exist and that the son was

black, and there are documented descendants of this branch of the family.

One of them lives in Washington DC, and is retired military.

As fr slave quilts in the exhibition. the DAR has about 250 quilts in their

collection. At these quilt days they show about 30, and rotate them. It

would be difficult to say if there were any quilts made by slaves shown on

any one day. All slave quilts are not primitive you know. Many southern

quilts that are exquisitely beautiful were made by slaves to be used on the

beds of their masters. I have seen incredible needlework in broderie perse

quilts, stitched by slaves.

Jean Ann Eitel

America's Favorite Quilter

http://www.quiltmag.com

Let's Talk Quilting: dal.net IRC - /join #quilttalk

http://www.quiltmag.com/QuiltTalk/

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 07:50:26 -0500

From: Baglady111aol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Renwick Exhibit +++++

Message-ID: <961231075024_1290329713emout12.mail.aol.com>

Carol in VA..if you find a source for the TIME SPAN book, I'm interested as

well. infact, sources for all books mentioned, if they pretain to

history/stories of the quilters/etc are of interest apparently to all of

us..seems everytime I mention one or we see someone post a title..we want to

know..possibly, periodically we can find a way to form a list that would be

available to those of us that are interested..without taking up space from

our forum..thanx, Carol..jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 08:18:39 -0500

From: quiltmagmindspring.com (Jean Ann)

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: florida squatters

Message-Id: <v01540b27aeeec29c8e2a[168.121.76.43]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

josie...i am related to one of those Florida Squatters from the WPA, or

probably from before the WPA. yes, it was before. My great-aunt came to

Florida down the missippi on a flat bottom boat in the early 1900's. They

settled near ft myers where they had one of the first vegetable farms. The

ranchers in the area hated the squatters (just like the old west) and ran

their cattle over their gardens.

She used quilts to make walls in the house they built out in the swamp

until they could get real walls. I have a wonderful account of all this

that she wrote herself before she died.

Jean Ann Eitel

America's Favorite Quilter

http://www.quiltmag.com

Let's Talk Quilting: dal.net IRC - /join #quilttalk

http://www.quiltmag.com/QuiltTalk/

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 08:34:11 -0500

From: Baglady111aol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: cleaning antique quilts

Message-ID: <961231083410_876689703emout06.mail.aol.com>

this is an excellent question..I have the crazy quilt top my husband's

g.parents made back in the 1800's when they were courting..Yep, back in those

days they did such a thing while the man was wooing the lady..(this was

before drive-in movies)..there were some stains onthe back of the top and I

could'nt find a cleaner who would touch it..and this also before quilting had

surfaced once more..and I hae also been told that dry cleaning is more harsh

than water..the chemicals are extremely strong..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 08:34:58 -0500

From: Baglady111aol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: cleaning antique quilts

Message-ID: <961231083457_1822154536emout12.mail.aol.com>

Sorry, my post was in reply to Li-Joo in Australia's post..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 08:43:37 -0500

From: Baglady111aol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Antique Quilts in Western Australia

Message-ID: <961231084336_778457147emout04.mail.aol.com>

I am so pleased that Bev ent her post..she had emailed me with this info and

I felt you would enjoy readign it and it would give us pause for thought

about other countries in comparison to quilting history in our country. THE

FEEDSACK club is gaining more and more members from Australia and we are

delighted to be able to share OUR vintage feedsack fabric with them as they

inturn send us THEIRS..thanx Bev for insight into your history..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 09:00:55 EST

From: woodnsplrma.edu

To: Bev McGrath <bevmcgraiinet.net.au>, QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Antique Quilts in Western Australia

Message-Id: <199612311400.3272700rma.edu>

Content-Type: text/plain

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Bev,

Yes, there was plenty of poverty in this country. The farmers wives did

work hard and it will always amaze me that they did find time to quilt but them

some of that but certainly not all was of a sense of necessity. My maternal

born in 1891 couldn't have been poorer and raised 8 children. Her quilts are

pretty much utilitarian. But she had a eye for what was attractive. No matter

how bad things were she always had some kind of curtain in the windows and

potted plants. My Mother says they were never hungry but at time especially at

the end of winter the quality of their food wasn't so great. I do have one

tied

quilt she made and it isn't bad at all.

On the other hand my paternal Grandmother born in 1864, while poor, had

a higher standard of living. She did not marry so early and only had 3

children

spread out over 11 years. She also worked hard but they did have more. She

absolutely loved quilting and her quilts are just wonderful. Even her utility

are well quilted though much plainer.

I don't believe there is any way to really connect the two countries.

The social system was so different. I don't know but suspect that families

lived closed to each other so were more able to help each other out and pass on

ideas, trade fabrics, patterns etc.

Ann in VA

woodnsplrma.edu

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 08:58:17 -0500

From: quiltmagmindspring.com (Jean Ann)

To: AJSNGSaol.com, QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: whereis the old CCC camp?

Message-Id: <v01540b2eaeeecbf4c021[168.121.76.43]>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>Jean Ann,

>

>Where is the old CCC camp? H

nancy the old CCC Camp is in Hendersonville. it is called Kanuga and has

become an Episcopal retreat center. It is near the end of the Skyline

Drive. There are other church camps in the area that were old CCC Camps.

After the program shut down a lot of the camps were given to churches.

Kanuga is near Georgia Bonesteel's quilt shop. Also lots of factory outlet

fabric shopping.

Good thing we didnt have such rigid separation of church and state back then!

Jean Ann Eitel

America's Favorite Quilter

http://www.quiltmag.com

Let's Talk Quilting: dal.net IRC - /join #quilttalk

http://www.quiltmag.com/QuiltTalk/

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 06:16:18 -0800 (PST)

From: Michele Weise <michelepeppertreestudios.com>

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Australian beginnings

Message-Id: <199612311416.GAA17011acme.sb.west.net>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

To Bev in Australia, Your history is very fascinating. Tell us more if you

can about the calico sacks and their labels. It makes me more aware of the

heritage of quilting that we have in our country. I've often thought about

how many old quilts are really out there and if there still are any unfound

treasures that might make their way to my door. Listening to Bev, I realize

what a cultural phenomenon quilting is and how lucky we are to have it. I

think this group is fascinating and always, always, interesting. Happy New

Year everybody!

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 07:47:24 -0700

From: "Mary E Scott" <mscott28cybertrails.com>

To: <QHLcue.com>, "Bev McGrath" <bevmcgraiinet.net.au>

Subject: QHL: Re: Antique Quilts in Western Australia

Message-Id: <199612310041.HAA20230 cybertrails.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Bev:

How interesting. I knew that Australia was started as a penal colony but I

didn't realize what a struggle it was to make a go of it. I enjoyed your

story. Thanks and Happy New Year .

Mary

mscott28cybertrails.com

http://inficad.com/~lightsp/suitee/index.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 08:05:12 -0700

From: "Mary E Scott" <mscott28cybertrails.com>

To: <QHLcuenet.com>, "Jean Ann" <quiltmagmindspring.com>

Subject: QHL: Re: florida squatters

Message-Id: <199612310102.IAA20470 cybertrails.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi Jean Ann:

You said that you had an account of your grandmother from early Florida.

Could you perhaps share it with us piece by piece. Like a continuing

serial. It would be so interesting to read. Is it a diary or what? I am

really curious.

Mary

mscott28cybertrails.com

http://inficad.com/~lightsp/suitee/index.html

------------------------------

Date: 31 Dec 96 11:02:27 EST

From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037CompuServe.COM>

To: "INTERNET:QHLcue.com" <QHLcue.com>

Subject: Re: QHL: moth balls

Message-ID: <961231160226_75444.1037_FHQ44-2CompuServe.COM>

There are better things than moth balls but moth balls are ok if you put them

into a storage sack and not have them loose. They off gas some pretty bad stuff

but they are effective. A good thing to do is to hang the moth balls up in a

bag not touching anything and stay away from yourself .

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 11:06:56 -0500

From: MHerron4aol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: Keep sending digest

Message-ID: <961231110529_1410908008emout16.mail.aol.com>

Hi,

As much as I treasure the knowledge gained here. I think I should just

recieve your wonderful digest as I'm finding the quantity of mail somewhat

overwhelming. Your digest appears to be a wonderful encapsulation of the

best of the list. Thanks for all your trouble. MHerron4aol.com

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 08:11:11 -0800

From: lrobinscclink.fhcrc.org (laurarm)

To: qhlcue.com, lrobinscclink.fhcrc.org (laurarm)

Subject: QHL: More on linsey-woolsey

Message-ID: <2c93d970cclink.fhcrc.org>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Content-Description: cc:Mail note part

On Christmas day I was reading Roderick Kiracofe's book "The American

Quilt" and ran across a passage on linsey woolsey. It differs

slightly from some info that has already been posted, but I guess you

can always expect different interpretations of history. That's what

makes it interesting!

 

The bottom line was that linsey-woolsey (linen warp and woolen weft)

was first made in Lindsey, Suffolk, England (different spelling and

different county than a previous posting). He also said that in the

20th century, that term has been used erroneously and that true

linsey-woolsey (American) is rather rare. Some linsey woolsey fabric

was made in the 17th century in the American colonies but was soon

replaced by cloth using cotton yarn instead of linen for the warp and

so it wasn't true linsey-woolsey.

 

He said that most solid color cloth that some people now call

linsey-woolsey was actually "worsted" fabric (named after the English

village Worsted in Norwich). Worsted fabric was a light weight cloth

of long staple combed wool yarn.

 

(I didn't check out his sources, but I imagine his references are

listed if anyone wants to read further. He might be right about

linsey woolsey but the name has been used such a lot that it might be

impossible to correct the mistake.)

 

Laura Robins-Morris, Seattle

lrobinscclink.fhcrc.org

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 10:19:54 CDT

From: josiemtekstar.com

To: quiltmagmindspring.com (Jean Ann)

CC: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: RE: QHL: Unidentified subject!

Message-Id: <199612311619.KAA27785perham>

Its not Rabbit responding, but Jo from Minnesota who would say No, no, no!

to using fibreglas anything near an old quilt. Having worked with

fibreglas drapery of years ago, I know no matter how it was handled, you

wound up with scratches and minute cuts on your hands. I think if

you wished to use screening, carefully used metal hardware cloth would be

the better choice of the two. But not sure I would use either!

Jo in Minnesota

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 08:17:26 -0800

From: lrobinscclink.fhcrc.org (laurarm)

To: qhlcue.com, lrobinscclink.fhcrc.org (laurarm)

Subject: QHL: quilts and moth balls

Message-ID: <2c93edc0cclink.fhcrc.org>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII

Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Content-Description: cc:Mail note part

Someone mentioned using moth balls to protect her quilts. I've never

known that moths were a problem with anything other than wools, so I

wouldn't have thought it necessary to use them with stored quilts.

Other opinions??

 

Also, the mothball smell is so difficult to remove. We had a

discussion of this on Quiltnet a while back. Some folks were able to

remove the smell by repeated washing and/or airing out; others

couldn't get rid of it no matter what they did.

 

Suggested alternatives (less smelly) to moth balls were bay leaves or

cedar chips (but don't let the raw wood chips touch the fabrics--use a

sock or bag).

 

Laura Robins-Morris, Seattle

lrobinscclink.fhcrc.org

 

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 08:28:36 -0800

From: jhavermother.com (JoAn Haverstock)

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Dresden Plate

Message-Id: <199612311628.IAA13149pa.mother.com>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dear All,

I am new to this list, but enjoying the exchange very much. Little did I

know that I would have a question so soon.

This weekend I was working as a hospice nurse and when I was in the

patient's home I asked about an antique quilt that was on the bed in the

spare bedroom. It was made by the patient's (in her 70's) husband's aunt.

It was a scrappy fan pattern.

I visited the house four different times that day and when I left the

daughter gave me a bag and said you might find a use for these. What a

*treasure*. In the bag were 11 scrappy dresden plates. They measure 14

inches across. Their are 20 sections and each fifth piece is the same

fabric and comes to a point instead of being rounded as are all of the other

pieces.

I would like suggestions on how to put these together to make a bed quilt.

Should I buy some 30's fabric for sashing or borders, or would that just

detract? I was thinking of using unbleached muslin. Is that the best

selection?

Thanks for being there.

:^)

JoAn in Davis, CA

jhavermother.com

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 11:55:36 -0500

From: Baglady111aol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: Re: florida squatters

Message-ID: <961231114230_1989943757emout14.mail.aol.com>

Jean Ann, Mary's suggestion is an excellent one..I'm sure we would all enjoy

it. I know textile history HAS to be in there as well. And as to Bev's post

abut Australia..I am in hopes that our American members of THE FEEDSACK CLUB

will take advantage of the opportunity to exchange feedsacks/other fabs my

members are involved with with our Australian members..we had a member

teaching English in Japan..Lorraine was from New England and had been over

there quite awhile teaching..I don't think many members took advantage of

trading feedsack for Japanese fabs..I SURE DID..we have a tendency to think

our world is our town, our county, our state, our country..NOT THE WORLD..and

because of this..dont' we miss alot. Lorraine is back here now, Japanese

fabric (as well as Australian) is HOT!! AND IT'S TOO LATE for trading..as I

look at my Japanese fabrics/quitls/items I acquired I say to myself..i got

mine!!..and now, it is info we are trading..WONDERFUL!! Jane

------------------------------

Date: 31 Dec 96 12:13:46 EST

From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037CompuServe.COM>

To: "INTERNET:QHLcue.com" <QHLcue.com>

Subject: Re: QHL: cleaning antique quilts

Message-ID: <961231171345_75444.1037_FHQ50-2CompuServe.COM>

the crazy quilt often uses textiles which would never have been wet cleaned in

their normal use so washing the quilt is totally out of the question Besides

the addition of metalic salts to many of silks cause what we cal lINHERENT VICE

( almost as good as the pop up turkey right) which means that the metalic salts

used to weight and dye silks cause them to become brittle and fall apart. There

isnt anything we can do about that really so they are doomed to die but washing

is the worst thing for them and dry cleaning is also not a good idea. Living

with it vvacumming is about the best

------------------------------

Date: 31 Dec 96 12:13:47 EST

From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037CompuServe.COM>

To: "INTERNET:QHLcue.com" <QHLcue.com>

Subject: Re: QHL: Unidentified subject!

Message-ID: <961231171347_75444.1037_FHQ50-3CompuServe.COM>

Yes vacumming is the best thing for removing particulate dirst which is the real

enemy The firberglass sreening is wonderful and I actually use a regular vac

because the dust buster may not be enough but I dont use a shop vac. I dont look

for cahnges that i can see to the textile though it still will look dirty but

thats ok as far as I am concerned except for dealers selling modern quilts and

I do understand that You need to be able to resell quilts but then you are

talking about quilts which are mostly 20th century. Everyone knows my interest

just about stops at 1900 right.?

------------------------------

Date: 31 Dec 96 13:05:19 EST

From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037CompuServe.COM>

To: "INTERNET:QHLcue.com" <QHLcue.com>

Subject: RE: QHL: Unidentified subject!

Message-ID: <961231180519_75444.1037_FHQ52-2CompuServe.COM>

Actually I have never had any trouble with fiberglass screening from the

hardware store it is flexible and non abrasive. Metasl can be sharp and is less

flexible. Let's be clear about why we use a screen for vacumming. The screen in

a fine mess keeps the fibers of the textile secure against the pulling power of

the vacumn and allows the dirt to leave. One person holds the screen down

tightly on the fabric the other person vacums by placing the vacum and lifting

it up to move it from spot to spot do not run the vacum across the textile lift

it and move it it takes time but is good for the textile I cover the edges of my

screen with duct tape so that it is smooth. I vacumm the dirtiest side first.

Rabbit

------------------------------

Date: 31 Dec 96 13:05:17 EST

From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037CompuServe.COM>

To: "INTERNET:QHLcue.com" <QHLcue.com>

Subject: Re: QHL: More on linsey-woolsey

Message-ID: <961231180517_75444.1037_FHQ52-1CompuServe.COM>

His material seems accurrate as far as it goes. Certainly dont confuse

"linsey-woolsey quilts" with the fabric linsey woolsey. THe quilts are qorsted

and have nothing to do with linen and wool. The production of both cloths was

well established both in Europe and the colonies from the 17th century on. But

that is why we need to carry a portable microscope available from radio shack

for 12.95 with 100 power magnification and check out what people tell us the

only way to identify what a fiber is is under the microscope no one can do it

without that and it takes less than 15 seconds and it doesnt harm the textile so

if you want to know what something is you find out its simple fast and fun and

makes you look really really good.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 13:00:51 CDT

From: josiemtekstar.com

To: 75444.1037CompuServe.COM

CC: QHLcue.com

Subject: RE: QHL: Unidentified subject!

Message-Id: <199612311900.NAA04572perham>

Hi there Rabbit Goody:

After working for a number of years around fibreglas drapery and winding up

with minute( unseeable) cuts on my hands (the only way I would know they

were there was by hand washing or rubbing my hands together) I would never

use any type of fibreglas cloth around fragile old fabric. I just wouldn't

do it.

I am no expert at all, just speaking from some experience, if it works for

you, great, its just that I wouldn't use it at all (Got to really hate the

stuff after a while!)

Jo in Minnesota

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 14:01:35 -0500

From: Baglady111aol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: quilts and moth balls

Message-ID: <961231134123_1390931203emout02.mail.aol.com>

In response to mothballs..msot people confuse eaten fabrics with moths..when

in actuallity it is often silverfish..these little buggers can eat up a quilt

in less than a months time..I had a friend who had one draped over th arm of

her couch and before you knew it..BADLY DAMAGED..being an herbalist, she made

up a batch of herbs and GONE!! Ever notice a towel or a washcloth alll of a

sudden has a hole it in and you think something in your washer 'tore' or

'ripped' it? Ever think that NOTHING else was torn/ripped?? In thinking

back it was something wet/or in contact with 'wet'..moths, to my knowledge,

do not attack cotton. Jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 14:14:19 -0500

From: Baglady111aol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: Re: QHL: More on linsey-woolsey

Message-ID: <961231133556_643306479emout07.mail.aol.com>

That is very probable, Laura..I am not sure of the correct spelling of the

town in England. I'm guessing the person who gave me the info figured it was

spelled the same way we have been spelling linsey wollesy..the piece that I

have is wool and linen..the red is the wool and the ecru or off white is the

linen. I can recall a lady in one of the audiences at my lecture said she

thought linsey-woolsey was wool and cotton, as you mention..when I took that

comment back to the lady who gave it to me she said, "well, I know it to be

wool and linen because I helped to weave it. My mother and g.mother made my

petticoats from it" Imagine sitting on something that rough (it's like a

horse blanket) all day in school and to boot her seat was DIERECTLY by the

pot belly stove..her legs must have been rubbed raw by the end of the day.

Thanks for adding to the discussion, Laura..this becomes more and more

intriguing..Jane

------------------------------

Date: 31 Dec 96 18:19:24 EST

From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037CompuServe.COM>

To: "INTERNET:QHLcue.com" <QHLcue.com>

Subject: Re: QHL: More on linsey-woolsey

Message-ID: <961231231923_75444.1037_FHQ48-1CompuServe.COM>

good linsey-woolsey is not rough at least the 18th century and early 19th

century pieces I have examined they are extremely fine with end and pick counts

in the high 40's compared to silk of course that is a different story but the

wool quality is usually very soft sometimes worsteds were used especially for

garments. That is another reason why when we are examining textiles we need to

check under the microscope and then take out our linen testers 9 pick glasses )

and count warp and filling so that we have some way of comparing textiles to

each other it is not enough to say it is linsey-woolsey we have to be able to

say whether it is fine or coarse and what that means and whether it is linen,

cotton, woolen, worsted, or silk

Rabbit

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 22:53:06 +0000

From: "Kathleen Duvall" <nanwkshplc.gulfnet.com>

To: QHLcuenet.com

Subject: QHL: Quilt Find

Message-Id: <03555390616319kong.gulfnet.com>

Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII

Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

DH came home from a moving sale with a quilt for me and it's unlike

any I've ever seen before! Can anyone tell me anything about it?

It's obviously very old, but I have no idea how old. It's all hand

pieced and hand quilted with very little batting. There are some

holes in a couple places. The pattern of this quilt is 6 large

donkies pieced with squares. The background is a "tea-dye" color,

the donkey is tan with hooves, saddle, tip of tail in red, an eye in

white. I've never seen a donkey quilt before, but I love it!

TIA

Kathleen in Florida

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 23:35:28 -0500

From: QuiltLineaol.com

To: QHLcue.com

Subject: QHL: cleaning quilts

Message-ID: <961231233528_1189788129emout14.mail.aol.com>

This thread seems to be endless, but I need to stick my two cents in here

with regards to vacuuming (wacuuming to some, but really, who cares!??)

quilts. Rather than use a screen, which I used to do, I now cover the end of

the vacuum hose with the foot from a nylon stocking, and secure it onto the

hose with a rubber band. Works well for me!

If a quilt must absolutely be cleaned, please, the best thing to do is

contact your local museum, one that handles textiles and ask them what

professional textile cleaner they use.

There is a great deal of difference between cleaning a quilt and restoring,

repairing a quilt, and unless I missed something somewhere, it seems that

this thread started when someone asked about cleaning a quilt, then it got

off on a discussion on restoration/preservation/conservation. I don't

disagree that good and appropriate restoration can benefit a quilt, but then

again, I don't think that every quilt warrants restoration, I agree with the

person who made the comment about it depends upon the owners preference.

I have seen restoration increase the value on quilts and I have seen

restoration ruin the value of a quilt, and it wasn't done poorly. Like

people, quilts are individual, each with their own personality so to speak.

They should never be put into a single category of do's and don'ts.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 21:43:51 -0500
From: Knutemaol.com
To: QHLcuenet.com

I will be in Washington, DC for a weekend in February and was wondering where
to go to see some of the antique quilts? Also, which area of the Smithsonian
has them?
Thanks,
Bet in Florida

------------------------------

Date: Mon, 30 Dec 1996 23:10:02 -0500
From: RLHlink3aol.com
To: QHLcue.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Re: QHL-Digest Digest V96 #27
Message-ID: <961230231002_1457958142emout05.mail.aol.com>

Dear Jan in NJ

Thank you for your long msg. I enjoyed every bit of it and I'm sure others
have too. It is very stormy here in my newly adopted N. CA home --a great
night to be curled up with the QHL, chatting with new friends about these
"old dears" (quilts).

Linda

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 17:52:24 +1100 (EST)
From: Li Joo Ng <lngbf.rmit.edu.au>
To: Posting <QHLcuenet.com>
Subject: QHL: cleaning antique quilts
Message-ID: <Pine.OSF.3.95.961231174535.30570A-100000otto.bf.rmit.edu.au>
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII

All this discussions about cleaning and washing antique quilts has kept me
glued to my computer for the past few days. I am very interested in seeing
what everyone has to say, and I feel that in their own way, everyone has a
point and no one is wrong. Since we have so many experts here, I would
like to ask when, if ever, is it all right to dry clean an antique quilt?
Most quilts are made of cotton, so how would they react to dry cleaning?
And what about crazy quilts that have silks and velvets in them?

Thanks, everyone, for sharing your tips and opinions. Have a Happy and
Healthy New Year!

LiJoo - in sunny Australia

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 16:27:41 +0800
From: Bev McGrath <bevmcgraiinet.net.au>
To: QHLcue.com
Subject: QHL: Antique Quilts in Western Australia
Message-Id: <199612310827.QAA28988grunge.iinet.net.au>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hi to all, This is my second letter to the forum, I enjoy it very much and
love hearing all the hints about caring for antique quilts.

I am Bev McGrath, writing to you all from Perth in Western Australia, where
tomorrow (Tuesday) the temperature is going to be 35C (about 92F) and
Wednesday and Thursday 40C (about 104F). I include this as I have just seen
on the TV reports about the terrible storms that are occuring in the North
West of the US.

We don't have a large number of antique quilts here is Australia owing to
the weather (which is suitable for light quilts only) and a history of
poverty and deprivation the early settlers and convicts faced. Australia
was first settled in 1788 as a penal colony, so the majority of the very
small population (male & female) were convicts. Even so, all (free
settlers, soldiers, prison staff and convicts) faced the same problems of
starvation and poverty.

Tasmania has the worst record for brutality and cruelty as a penal colony,
but even there the convicts had a better diet than the settlers. They grew
the food and were able to pick and eat it before the other people were even
aware it was ripe.

Quilting in Australia is a modern art, able to be taken up when the standard
of living rose post WW11 to the state where people had the time and money to
indulge in these past-times.

My mother was a great knitter but quilting is something I had not heard of
until the last 10 or so years. Even feed sacks (as produced in America) are
unknown here, only calico bags with stamped labels. Mum grew up on a farm
and was too busy working to do anything else. She left home the moment she
could and came to the city to work as a servant until she got married. This
was in the 1930's Grandma didn't sew either, as she was too busy being a
farmers wife and mother of four.

It is VERY interesting learning about the culture of a foreigh country
(USA). I find it intreging how many antique quilts are available. Surely
the farmers wives etc worked just as hard as ours? The only thing I can
think of is that America was settled about 100 years before Australia (West
Australia was the last state in 1829) and therefore there were more
generations of people to raise the standard of living.

WA started out as a free state (no convicts) but had to accept them in 1840
as the colony was in deep depression. The population were starving and many
were fleeing to other states in desparation. Convicts were needed for
labour, both by the Government (the first Public Servants) and the farmers.
People were too busy trying to stay alive to have time or the implements to
make quilts.

Conditions improved by 1860 and transportation stopped. Now we have a
legacy of many fine buildings built with convict labout, but FEW QUILTS.

I will add any other interesting things as I come across them.
Best wishes all our friends and fellow quilters.
Bev McGrath in sunny Perth, Western Australia

Bev McGrath in sunny Perth, Western Australia
bevmcgraiinet.net.au

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 07:45:41 -0500
From: quiltmagmindspring.com (Jean Ann)
To: QHLcue.com
Subject: QHL: Unidentified subject!
Message-Id: <v01540b11aeeeb1718592[168.121.76.43]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Textiles are not like turkeys they do not have a pop up timer to tell you when
they simply will disintegrate.

This is the best statement made so far on the QHL list. I laughed and
laughed, but it is too true. Everytime someone says, i just popped that old
quilt in the washing machine, or i took it to the cleaners....i groan!

at one conservation day i attended the expert advice was to go to Home
Depot, purchase some very fine fiberglas screening. Lay the quilt on the
floor. GENTLY place the screen over it and then lightly vacuum it with your
Dustbuster, NOT your garage power vac.

Dust motes and dirt are enemies of your textiles, and this will remove a
lot of them.

Waiting to hear Rabbit's comments on this! is it okay or not? I have never
tried it, but it made sense. My worry would be to make sure the screening
was laid down in such a way, very carefully, so it did not cause abrasion
on the surface of the quilt.

Jean Ann Eitel
America's Favorite Quilter
http://www.quiltmag.com

Let's Talk Quilting: dal.net IRC - /join #quilttalk
http://www.quiltmag.com/QuiltTalk/

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 07:45:38 -0500
From: quiltmagmindspring.com (Jean Ann)
To: QHLcue.com
Subject: QHL: DAR...has changed
Message-Id: <v01540b10aeeeaea1dc44[168.121.76.43]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Yes that did happen, and it was a very shameful moment in the DAR when they
refused to let Marian Anderson. It was in the 1930's and unfortunately that
kind of terrible discrimination was common then, all over the USA. Black
Americans couldnt go to *white* colleges then either (and neither could
women, DAR or not!)....elitist schools like Harvard and Yale now accept
both blacks and women students into their hallowed halls. So while this
type of discrimination is very wrong and I admire Eleanor Roosevelt highly
for what she did.....there are a LOT of organizations that have had to open
their hallowed halls, not just the DAR.

Yes, The DAR has changed its policy. And yes they do allow African
Americans who are descended from Revolutionaly War veterans into their
organization. How do I know this? I am a descendant, and one branch of our
very large, very early to America family (Hawley is surname) seems to have
married a black woman (before the revolutionary war), had children, and so
our family tree has many black members, some of whom also fought for the
Federals in that "recent unpleasantness" (what we call the War Between The
States here in Georgia). Now I say *seems* to have married a black woman
because the church records are incomplete, but we do know a Hawley male
child was baptised for the records that do exist and that the son was
black, and there are documented descendants of this branch of the family.
One of them lives in Washington DC, and is retired military.

As fr slave quilts in the exhibition. the DAR has about 250 quilts in their
collection. At these quilt days they show about 30, and rotate them. It
would be difficult to say if there were any quilts made by slaves shown on
any one day. All slave quilts are not primitive you know. Many southern
quilts that are exquisitely beautiful were made by slaves to be used on the
beds of their masters. I have seen incredible needlework in broderie perse
quilts, stitched by slaves.

Jean Ann Eitel
America's Favorite Quilter
http://www.quiltmag.com

Let's Talk Quilting: dal.net IRC - /join #quilttalk
http://www.quiltmag.com/QuiltTalk/

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 07:50:26 -0500
From: Baglady111aol.com
To: QHLcue.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Renwick Exhibit +++++
Message-ID: <961231075024_1290329713emout12.mail.aol.com>

Carol in VA..if you find a source for the TIME SPAN book, I'm interested as
well. infact, sources for all books mentioned, if they pretain to
history/stories of the quilters/etc are of interest apparently to all of
us..seems everytime I mention one or we see someone post a title..we want to
know..possibly, periodically we can find a way to form a list that would be
available to those of us that are interested..without taking up space from
our forum..thanx, Carol..jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 08:18:39 -0500
From: quiltmagmindspring.com (Jean Ann)
To: QHLcuenet.com
Subject: QHL: florida squatters
Message-Id: <v01540b27aeeec29c8e2a[168.121.76.43]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

josie...i am related to one of those Florida Squatters from the WPA, or
probably from before the WPA. yes, it was before. My great-aunt came to
Florida down the missippi on a flat bottom boat in the early 1900's. They
settled near ft myers where they had one of the first vegetable farms. The
ranchers in the area hated the squatters (just like the old west) and ran
their cattle over their gardens.

She used quilts to make walls in the house they built out in the swamp
until they could get real walls. I have a wonderful account of all this
that she wrote herself before she died.

Jean Ann Eitel
America's Favorite Quilter
http://www.quiltmag.com

Let's Talk Quilting: dal.net IRC - /join #quilttalk
http://www.quiltmag.com/QuiltTalk/

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 08:34:11 -0500
From: Baglady111aol.com
To: QHLcue.com
Subject: Re: QHL: cleaning antique quilts
Message-ID: <961231083410_876689703emout06.mail.aol.com>

this is an excellent question..I have the crazy quilt top my husband's
g.parents made back in the 1800's when they were courting..Yep, back in those
days they did such a thing while the man was wooing the lady..(this was
before drive-in movies)..there were some stains onthe back of the top and I
could'nt find a cleaner who would touch it..and this also before quilting had
surfaced once more..and I hae also been told that dry cleaning is more harsh
than water..the chemicals are extremely strong..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 08:43:37 -0500
From: Baglady111aol.com
To: QHLcue.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Antique Quilts in Western Australia
Message-ID: <961231084336_778457147emout04.mail.aol.com>

I am so pleased that Bev ent her post..she had emailed me with this info and
I felt you would enjoy readign it and it would give us pause for thought
about other countries in comparison to quilting history in our country. THE
FEEDSACK club is gaining more and more members from Australia and we are
delighted to be able to share OUR vintage feedsack fabric with them as they
inturn send us THEIRS..thanx Bev for insight into your history..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 09:00:55 EST
From: woodnsplrma.edu
To: Bev McGrath <bevmcgraiinet.net.au>, QHLcue.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Antique Quilts in Western Australia
Message-Id: <199612311400.3272700rma.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Bev,
    Yes, there was plenty of poverty in this country. The farmers wives did
work hard and it will always amaze me that they did find time to quilt but them
some of that but certainly not all was of a sense of necessity. My maternal
born in 1891 couldn't have been poorer and raised 8 children. Her quilts are
pretty much utilitarian. But she had a eye for what was attractive. No matter
how bad things were she always had some kind of curtain in the windows and
potted plants. My Mother says they were never hungry but at time especially at
the end of winter the quality of their food wasn't so great. I do have one
tied
quilt she made and it isn't bad at all.
    On the other hand my paternal Grandmother born in 1864, while poor, had
a higher standard of living. She did not marry so early and only had 3
children
spread out over 11 years. She also worked hard but they did have more. She
absolutely loved quilting and her quilts are just wonderful. Even her utility
are well quilted though much plainer.
    I don't believe there is any way to really connect the two countries.
The social system was so different. I don't know but suspect that families
lived closed to each other so were more able to help each other out and pass on
ideas, trade fabrics, patterns etc.

Ann in VA
woodnsplrma.edu

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 08:58:17 -0500
From: quiltmagmindspring.com (Jean Ann)
To: AJSNGSaol.com, QHLcuenet.com
Subject: QHL: whereis the old CCC camp?
Message-Id: <v01540b2eaeeecbf4c021[168.121.76.43]>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

>Jean Ann,
>
>Where is the old CCC camp? H

nancy the old CCC Camp is in Hendersonville. it is called Kanuga and has
become an Episcopal retreat center. It is near the end of the Skyline
Drive. There are other church camps in the area that were old CCC Camps.
After the program shut down a lot of the camps were given to churches.

Kanuga is near Georgia Bonesteel's quilt shop. Also lots of factory outlet
fabric shopping.

Good thing we didnt have such rigid separation of church and state back then!

Jean Ann Eitel
America's Favorite Quilter
http://www.quiltmag.com

Let's Talk Quilting: dal.net IRC - /join #quilttalk
http://www.quiltmag.com/QuiltTalk/

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 06:16:18 -0800 (PST)
From: Michele Weise <michelepeppertreestudios.com>
To: QHLcue.com
Subject: QHL: Australian beginnings
Message-Id: <199612311416.GAA17011acme.sb.west.net>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

To Bev in Australia, Your history is very fascinating. Tell us more if you
can about the calico sacks and their labels. It makes me more aware of the
heritage of quilting that we have in our country. I've often thought about
how many old quilts are really out there and if there still are any unfound
treasures that might make their way to my door. Listening to Bev, I realize
what a cultural phenomenon quilting is and how lucky we are to have it. I
think this group is fascinating and always, always, interesting. Happy New
Year everybody!

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 07:47:24 -0700
From: "Mary E Scott" <mscott28cybertrails.com>
To: <QHLcue.com>, "Bev McGrath" <bevmcgraiinet.net.au>
Subject: QHL: Re: Antique Quilts in Western Australia
Message-Id: <199612310041.HAA20230 cybertrails.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Bev:

How interesting. I knew that Australia was started as a penal colony but I
didn't realize what a struggle it was to make a go of it. I enjoyed your
story. Thanks and Happy New Year .

Mary
mscott28cybertrails.com
http://inficad.com/~lightsp/suitee/index.html

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 08:05:12 -0700
From: "Mary E Scott" <mscott28cybertrails.com>
To: <QHLcuenet.com>, "Jean Ann" <quiltmagmindspring.com>
Subject: QHL: Re: florida squatters
Message-Id: <199612310102.IAA20470 cybertrails.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi Jean Ann:

You said that you had an account of your grandmother from early Florida.
Could you perhaps share it with us piece by piece. Like a continuing
serial. It would be so interesting to read. Is it a diary or what? I am
really curious.

Mary
mscott28cybertrails.com
http://inficad.com/~lightsp/suitee/index.html

------------------------------

Date: 31 Dec 96 11:02:27 EST
From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037CompuServe.COM>
To: "INTERNET:QHLcue.com" <QHLcue.com>
Subject: Re: QHL: moth balls
Message-ID: <961231160226_75444.1037_FHQ44-2CompuServe.COM>

There are better things than moth balls but moth balls are ok if you put them
into a storage sack and not have them loose. They off gas some pretty bad stuff
but they are effective. A good thing to do is to hang the moth balls up in a
bag not touching anything and stay away from yourself .

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 11:06:56 -0500
From: MHerron4aol.com
To: QHLcue.com
Subject: QHL: Keep sending digest
Message-ID: <961231110529_1410908008emout16.mail.aol.com>

Hi,
As much as I treasure the knowledge gained here. I think I should just
recieve your wonderful digest as I'm finding the quantity of mail somewhat
overwhelming. Your digest appears to be a wonderful encapsulation of the
best of the list. Thanks for all your trouble. MHerron4aol.com

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 08:11:11 -0800
From: lrobinscclink.fhcrc.org (laurarm)
To: qhlcue.com, lrobinscclink.fhcrc.org (laurarm)
Subject: QHL: More on linsey-woolsey
Message-ID: <2c93d970cclink.fhcrc.org>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Description: cc:Mail note part

On Christmas day I was reading Roderick Kiracofe's book "The American
Quilt" and ran across a passage on linsey woolsey. It differs
slightly from some info that has already been posted, but I guess you
can always expect different interpretations of history. That's what
makes it interesting!

The bottom line was that linsey-woolsey (linen warp and woolen weft)
was first made in Lindsey, Suffolk, England (different spelling and
different county than a previous posting). He also said that in the
20th century, that term has been used erroneously and that true
linsey-woolsey (American) is rather rare. Some linsey woolsey fabric
was made in the 17th century in the American colonies but was soon
replaced by cloth using cotton yarn instead of linen for the warp and
so it wasn't true linsey-woolsey.

He said that most solid color cloth that some people now call
linsey-woolsey was actually "worsted" fabric (named after the English
village Worsted in Norwich). Worsted fabric was a light weight cloth
of long staple combed wool yarn.

(I didn't check out his sources, but I imagine his references are
listed if anyone wants to read further. He might be right about
linsey woolsey but the name has been used such a lot that it might be
impossible to correct the mistake.)

Laura Robins-Morris, Seattle
lrobinscclink.fhcrc.org

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 10:19:54 CDT
From: josiemtekstar.com
To: quiltmagmindspring.com (Jean Ann)
CC: QHLcuenet.com
Subject: RE: QHL: Unidentified subject!
Message-Id: <199612311619.KAA27785perham>

Its not Rabbit responding, but Jo from Minnesota who would say No, no, no!
to using fibreglas anything near an old quilt. Having worked with
fibreglas drapery of years ago, I know no matter how it was handled, you
wound up with scratches and minute cuts on your hands. I think if
you wished to use screening, carefully used metal hardware cloth would be
the better choice of the two. But not sure I would use either!

Jo in Minnesota

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 08:17:26 -0800
From: lrobinscclink.fhcrc.org (laurarm)
To: qhlcue.com, lrobinscclink.fhcrc.org (laurarm)
Subject: QHL: quilts and moth balls
Message-ID: <2c93edc0cclink.fhcrc.org>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Description: cc:Mail note part

Someone mentioned using moth balls to protect her quilts. I've never
known that moths were a problem with anything other than wools, so I
wouldn't have thought it necessary to use them with stored quilts.
Other opinions??

Also, the mothball smell is so difficult to remove. We had a
discussion of this on Quiltnet a while back. Some folks were able to
remove the smell by repeated washing and/or airing out; others
couldn't get rid of it no matter what they did.

Suggested alternatives (less smelly) to moth balls were bay leaves or
cedar chips (but don't let the raw wood chips touch the fabrics--use a
sock or bag).

Laura Robins-Morris, Seattle
lrobinscclink.fhcrc.org


------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 08:28:36 -0800
From: jhavermother.com (JoAn Haverstock)
To: QHLcuenet.com
Subject: QHL: Dresden Plate
Message-Id: <199612311628.IAA13149pa.mother.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dear All,

I am new to this list, but enjoying the exchange very much. Little did I
know that I would have a question so soon.

This weekend I was working as a hospice nurse and when I was in the
patient's home I asked about an antique quilt that was on the bed in the
spare bedroom. It was made by the patient's (in her 70's) husband's aunt.
It was a scrappy fan pattern.

I visited the house four different times that day and when I left the
daughter gave me a bag and said you might find a use for these. What a
*treasure*. In the bag were 11 scrappy dresden plates. They measure 14
inches across. Their are 20 sections and each fifth piece is the same
fabric and comes to a point instead of being rounded as are all of the other
pieces.

I would like suggestions on how to put these together to make a bed quilt.
Should I buy some 30's fabric for sashing or borders, or would that just
detract? I was thinking of using unbleached muslin. Is that the best
selection?

Thanks for being there.
:^)
JoAn in Davis, CA
jhavermother.com

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 11:55:36 -0500
From: Baglady111aol.com
To: QHLcue.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Re: florida squatters
Message-ID: <961231114230_1989943757emout14.mail.aol.com>

Jean Ann, Mary's suggestion is an excellent one..I'm sure we would all enjoy
it. I know textile history HAS to be in there as well. And as to Bev's post
abut Australia..I am in hopes that our American members of THE FEEDSACK CLUB
will take advantage of the opportunity to exchange feedsacks/other fabs my
members are involved with with our Australian members..we had a member
teaching English in Japan..Lorraine was from New England and had been over
there quite awhile teaching..I don't think many members took advantage of
trading feedsack for Japanese fabs..I SURE DID..we have a tendency to think
our world is our town, our county, our state, our country..NOT THE WORLD..and
because of this..dont' we miss alot. Lorraine is back here now, Japanese
fabric (as well as Australian) is HOT!! AND IT'S TOO LATE for trading..as I
look at my Japanese fabrics/quitls/items I acquired I say to myself..i got
mine!!..and now, it is info we are trading..WONDERFUL!! Jane

------------------------------

Date: 31 Dec 96 12:13:46 EST
From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037CompuServe.COM>
To: "INTERNET:QHLcue.com" <QHLcue.com>
Subject: Re: QHL: cleaning antique quilts
Message-ID: <961231171345_75444.1037_FHQ50-2CompuServe.COM>

the crazy quilt often uses textiles which would never have been wet cleaned in
their normal use so washing the quilt is totally out of the question Besides
the addition of metalic salts to many of silks cause what we cal lINHERENT VICE
( almost as good as the pop up turkey right) which means that the metalic salts
used to weight and dye silks cause them to become brittle and fall apart. There
isnt anything we can do about that really so they are doomed to die but washing
is the worst thing for them and dry cleaning is also not a good idea. Living
with it vvacumming is about the best

------------------------------

Date: 31 Dec 96 12:13:47 EST
From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037CompuServe.COM>
To: "INTERNET:QHLcue.com" <QHLcue.com>
Subject: Re: QHL: Unidentified subject!
Message-ID: <961231171347_75444.1037_FHQ50-3CompuServe.COM>

Yes vacumming is the best thing for removing particulate dirst which is the real
enemy The firberglass sreening is wonderful and I actually use a regular vac
because the dust buster may not be enough but I dont use a shop vac. I dont look
for cahnges that i can see to the textile though it still will look dirty but
thats ok as far as I am concerned except for dealers selling modern quilts and
I do understand that You need to be able to resell quilts but then you are
talking about quilts which are mostly 20th century. Everyone knows my interest
just about stops at 1900 right.?

------------------------------

Date: 31 Dec 96 13:05:19 EST
From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037CompuServe.COM>
To: "INTERNET:QHLcue.com" <QHLcue.com>
Subject: RE: QHL: Unidentified subject!
Message-ID: <961231180519_75444.1037_FHQ52-2CompuServe.COM>

Actually I have never had any trouble with fiberglass screening from the
hardware store it is flexible and non abrasive. Metasl can be sharp and is less
flexible. Let's be clear about why we use a screen for vacumming. The screen in
a fine mess keeps the fibers of the textile secure against the pulling power of
the vacumn and allows the dirt to leave. One person holds the screen down
tightly on the fabric the other person vacums by placing the vacum and lifting
it up to move it from spot to spot do not run the vacum across the textile lift
it and move it it takes time but is good for the textile I cover the edges of my
screen with duct tape so that it is smooth. I vacumm the dirtiest side first.
Rabbit

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Date: 31 Dec 96 13:05:17 EST
From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037CompuServe.COM>
To: "INTERNET:QHLcue.com" <QHLcue.com>
Subject: Re: QHL: More on linsey-woolsey
Message-ID: <961231180517_75444.1037_FHQ52-1CompuServe.COM>

His material seems accurrate as far as it goes. Certainly dont confuse
"linsey-woolsey quilts" with the fabric linsey woolsey. THe quilts are qorsted
and have nothing to do with linen and wool. The production of both cloths was
well established both in Europe and the colonies from the 17th century on. But
that is why we need to carry a portable microscope available from radio shack
for 12.95 with 100 power magnification and check out what people tell us the
only way to identify what a fiber is is under the microscope no one can do it
without that and it takes less than 15 seconds and it doesnt harm the textile so
if you want to know what something is you find out its simple fast and fun and
makes you look really really good.

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 13:45:27 -0500
From: Baglady111aol.com
To: QHLcue.com
Subject: Re: QHL: cleaning antique quilts
Message-ID: <961231134413_1591583546emout19.mail.aol.com>

OK, I'll be the first to ask..what is 'wacumming??"

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 13:51:53 -0500
From: Baglady111aol.com
To: QHLcue.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Dresden Plate
Message-ID: <961231134242_1122613127emout04.mail.aol.com>

well, here I go again..let me know if you decide on feedsacks..Jane

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Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 13:00:51 CDT
From: josiemtekstar.com
To: 75444.1037CompuServe.COM
CC: QHLcue.com
Subject: RE: QHL: Unidentified subject!
Message-Id: <199612311900.NAA04572perham>

Hi there Rabbit Goody:

After working for a number of years around fibreglas drapery and winding up
with minute( unseeable) cuts on my hands (the only way I would know they
were there was by hand washing or rubbing my hands together) I would never
use any type of fibreglas cloth around fragile old fabric. I just wouldn't
do it.

I am no expert at all, just speaking from some experience, if it works for
you, great, its just that I wouldn't use it at all (Got to really hate the
stuff after a while!)

Jo in Minnesota

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 14:01:35 -0500
From: Baglady111aol.com
To: QHLcue.com
Subject: Re: QHL: quilts and moth balls
Message-ID: <961231134123_1390931203emout02.mail.aol.com>

In response to mothballs..msot people confuse eaten fabrics with moths..when
in actuallity it is often silverfish..these little buggers can eat up a quilt
in less than a months time..I had a friend who had one draped over th arm of
her couch and before you knew it..BADLY DAMAGED..being an herbalist, she made
up a batch of herbs and GONE!! Ever notice a towel or a washcloth alll of a
sudden has a hole it in and you think something in your washer 'tore' or
'ripped' it? Ever think that NOTHING else was torn/ripped?? In thinking
back it was something wet/or in contact with 'wet'..moths, to my knowledge,
do not attack cotton. Jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 14:14:19 -0500
From: Baglady111aol.com
To: QHLcue.com
Subject: Re: QHL: More on linsey-woolsey
Message-ID: <961231133556_643306479emout07.mail.aol.com>

That is very probable, Laura..I am not sure of the correct spelling of the
town in England. I'm guessing the person who gave me the info figured it was
spelled the same way we have been spelling linsey wollesy..the piece that I
have is wool and linen..the red is the wool and the ecru or off white is the
linen. I can recall a lady in one of the audiences at my lecture said she
thought linsey-woolsey was wool and cotton, as you mention..when I took that
comment back to the lady who gave it to me she said, "well, I know it to be
wool and linen because I helped to weave it. My mother and g.mother made my
petticoats from it" Imagine sitting on something that rough (it's like a
horse blanket) all day in school and to boot her seat was DIERECTLY by the
pot belly stove..her legs must have been rubbed raw by the end of the day.
Thanks for adding to the discussion, Laura..this becomes more and more
intriguing..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 14:36:26 -0500
From: Baglady111aol.com
To: QHLcue.com
Subject: Re: QHL: More on linsey-woolsey
Message-ID: <961231142506_1855753363emout05.mail.aol.com>

Ok, I'll be the first to ask..what is 'qorsted?' Jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 14:37:18 -0500
From: Baglady111aol.com
To: QHLcuenet.com
Subject: QHL: lost portion of a post
Message-ID: <961231141727_1922856518emout15.mail.aol.com>

Does anyone have teh entire post of Rabbit Goody's post on 12/17..all I have
is "carding is teh second step in preparation of short fibers such as cotton
and wool for spinning or making batts" etc..I had been off the net for
awhile, was trying to catch up and somehow did'nt get the entire post..also,
Rabbit, did I miss you bio? Had you posted one? On your last post you ended
by saying "everyone knows my interest jsut about stops at 1900 right?" I
didn't so thought it might have been in your bio..greatly appreciated..jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 13:51:37 CDT
From: josiemtekstar.com
To: QHLcuenet.com
CC: Baglady111aol.com
Subject: QHL: Typos?
Message-Id: <199612311951.NAA06743perham>

Hello:

<<hat is 'qorsted?'>> <<wacumming>> Am I the only one out here
who assumes typos when I see these kinds of words? I wouldn't occur to me
to ask what they mean since I look at them and see "typo".

Now perhaps I am wrong in this assumption and if so, ignorance IS
bliss!

Jo in Minnesota

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 15:41:24 -0500
From: Baglady111aol.com
To: QHLcue.com
Subject: Re: QHL: More on linsey-woolsey
Message-ID: <961231154119_1156180918emout15.mail.aol.com>

Hi Laura, in reading over my post I realized it doesn't read right..when I
posted that the lady in the audience said she thought it to be wool and
cotton..she was not referring to MY piece being shown..she was stating that
she had heard that linsey woolsey was wool/cotton..when I inturn went back to
Effie and told her about the comment, she said "well I know THIS piece to be
wool and linen because I helped to weave it along with my mother and
g.mother" and actually, she did not comment, to my knowledge, about the
lady's comment. I didn't want you to think I was disputing your statement..I
often wonder how many times myself and others write something and it sure
doesn't come out the way we are thinking..anyway, I thank you for adding to
the subject and look forward more you can offer or from others as well..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 15:42:57 -0500
From: Baglady111aol.com

I would like to ask more about the cotton carding post of several weeks
ago..does anyone have th eoriginal posts aobut cotton carding..Sadierose and
several others sent me some of what I missed..but would like the entire posts
if possible..Jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 17:12:52 -0500 (EST)
From: Quilting Heritage ListServ <QRSmail.albany.net>

I am forwarding this note from Jane Clark Staple AKA baglady111aol.com.
She sent it to me to make sure it was a viable topic for discussion, and I
certainly think it is! I am not sure what we can do about it, but perhaps
someone else does.

Kris

>I rec'd a box of acid free tissue paper
>for storing quilts...It is from the HOLLINGER CO in VA...it is for
>our prizes at convention..I called to thank them because it was such a nice
>donation..spoke to Ann Russell..she tells me they are NOT a new company but
>that they are also eliminating HER job because there isn't any need for
>paper/boxes/for storing textiles..everybody already knows it is available..I
>COULDN'T BELIEVE what I was hearing..another assuming job..in fact, I am
>guilty too..when I opened it, I tossed the tissue aside..NEVER THINKING..til
>I read her letter..anyway, besides HER company's attitude..she tells me MANY
>of our museums aren't concerned about protecting fabrics either..and yet,
>they deal with a lot of museums..SMITHSONIAN being one of them..she in fact had
>batch of 40x60 boxes that had been custom ordered. there was a mistake in
>them, so they had them their hands..she contacted about 25 museums and
>offered them at $15.00 (worth 65.00 to 70.00) NO ONE WANTED THEM..finally a
>Civil War Museum took them..she was telling me various war stories..one
>curator of a museum told someone to cut the buttons off the military
>uniforms..and use in another way..it didn't matter if you folded or
>rolled..you can roll on cardboard, there is not any difference between
>buffered and unbuffered tissue/boxes/etc..Kris, you would have been
>amazed..,Ann is not computer literate..I told her 'neither was I"..do you
>think I should bring this up on the forum? Do you think we should share this
>nightmare with others? Do you think quilters would be interested in writing
>the company to tell them how important her job/info is? I had suggested she
>do programs for guilds/quilt shows and she said the company didn't feel there
>was any interest out there..THEY weren't interested..Jane
>
>

------------------------------


Date: 31 Dec 96 18:19:24 EST
From: Rabbit Goody <75444.1037CompuServe.COM>

good linsey-woolsey is not rough at least the 18th century and early 19th
century pieces I have examined they are extremely fine with end and pick counts
in the high 40's compared to silk of course that is a different story but the
wool quality is usually very soft sometimes worsteds were used especially for
garments. That is another reason why when we are examining textiles we need to
check under the microscope and then take out our linen testers 9 pick glasses )
and count warp and filling so that we have some way of comparing textiles to
each other it is not enough to say it is linsey-woolsey we have to be able to
say whether it is fine or coarse and what that means and whether it is linen,
cotton, woolen, worsted, or silk

Rabbit

------------------------------

Date: 31 Dec 96 18:19:26 EST

I cannot spell or write so they certainly are my typos sorry I dont proof read
either
Rabbit

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 19:35:38 -0500

Rabbit, I would consider mailing you my piece for you to examine so I will
know if I have linsey woolsey..it is irreplaceable but do you think if I
insure/register/use overnight..it would be safe? I am so darn curious
now..I'm guessing it was early 1900's when this was done..Effie is in her
80's and she wore petticoats..well, I'm repeating myself..the piece I have IS
NOT of what she speaks..it is 'LIKE' what she wore..
Now, I would like to add another subject while I am replying to your post,
Rabbit..folding to a quilt or rolling..opinions, please..and if you roll..ON
WHAT?? open for discussion..jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 19:39:00 -0500
From: Baglady111aol.com
To: QHLcue.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Typos?
Message-ID: <961231193900_2054115362emout20.mail.aol.com>

with the wealth of knowledge you offer us, you don't have to spell..I took
the psot to a friend and she came up with worster and vacumming..then I saw
it and it jumped out at me..talk about feeling foolish..righ now tho I am
waiting for screaming after you read the post Kris did for me..jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 19:42:50 -0500
From: Baglady111aol.com
To: QHLcue.com
Subject: Re: QHL: Typos?
Message-ID: <961231194250_812731771emout14.mail.aol.com>

by the way, Rabbit..Kris and I figure the screaming will be coming from
you..did I make mention of that?? Jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 19:44:50 -0500
From: Baglady111aol.com

Rabbit, what does "end and pick counts " mean? I'm not familar with that
term..jane

------------------------------

Date: Tue, 31 Dec 1996 20:25:55 -0500
From: QuiltLineaol.com

Hi all,

RJR fabrics has a new website, where you can view all of their repro's on
line. I think it is at http://rjrfabrics.com It takes a while to open the
whole site, but there are some nice designs on the 'new designs' page.

Have fun!

Debbie

1997